Amazon.com Senior Software Engineer Interview Questions

Updated Jul 8, 2015
116 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeksinterviewed at Amazon.com (Seattle, WA).

    Interview

    First an HR rep contacted me with an hour personal interview. Then followed by a 1 hour technical interview (data structures, HashMaps, access times). There was a coding session.

    Interview Questions

  2. Helpful (2)  

    No Offer

    Interview

    Initial phone screen by engineer manager, basic computer science questions, collections, big O, work experience . 2nd phone screen with online coding via colabedit.com some quick question regarding web servers and http. Most of the time was a coding example re students, tests, quizzes and calculating a class score. On site interview met with 6 engineers all afternoon about 6 hours total. Most were technical solve on the white board type questions one was more of the out of the box type of questions. The coding questions were varied but all were more that a quick algorithm more like here is a problem write the code to solve it. Things like there are n people in a circle and every y person mus sit down write the algorithm to do this. Then If I am the first person in the circle how can I make sure I amd the last person.

    Interview Questions

    • Again solve this on a white board. Heard of the game Boggle. Ok then write an algorithm to solve a boggle came of 7x7 board.   Answer Question
  3.  

    No Offer
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter – interviewed at Amazon.com.

    Interview

    Received a call from amazon techincal recruiter. She had setup two telephonic interview. The interviewer asked about my previous projects and asked some basic object oriented concepts 1. Define a class , object , inteface 2. Expalin the difference between an interface and abstract class 3. Implement a reservation system for a restaurant etc

    Interview Questions

    • Implement a program to find whether a number is even or odd without using arithemetic operator   2 Answers
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  5.  

    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter – interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2013.

    Interview

    Got contacted by email initially, followed by a written tech questions, then an in person tech interview over the phone.

    Interview Questions

  6. Helpful (2)  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeksinterviewed at Amazon.com (Seattle, WA).

    Interview

    Two phone screen, went wel. Then they invited me to seattle, wa for the onsite interview. Everybody was very nice. five interviews, seven interviewer, 45 minutes each. basic algorithm, data structure and problem solving questions. Had to write code on white board.

    Interview Questions

  7. Helpful (2)  

    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took a weekinterviewed at Amazon.com (Boston, MA) in January 2013.

    Interview

    I applied for one of their East Coast jobs; got a reply back from one of their recruiters pretty quickly. She then sent me an email with detailed instructions on their phone screen process. For those that haven't gone through that experience, I'll summarize: they like to do "online white-boarding" sessions. That means you have to be near your computer, with online access to Collabedit. Also get ready to get grilled! This approach is convenient for them, but I'm a bit old-fashioned and prefer the in-person feel of an actual whiteboard. Anyway, I decided to just through their hoop, since my work commute is very short. I was to expect their call at 9:30 am...9:45...10am...and NO CALL! I let the HR gal know...and she didn't call me back to reschedule. So Amazon, it's perfectly for you to expect me to hold up my life and work, just so you can flake on me? So, if you want to work there, go right ahead..but methinks they think of themselves too highly! There are companies out there with less onerous hiring processes.

  8. Helpful (1)  

    Senior Software Development Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Cupertino, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ weeksinterviewed at Amazon.com (Cupertino, CA) in October 2012.

    Interview

    I have a friend at Lab126, a subsidiary of Amazon located in Cupertino, who referred me for a job with his team. I was prompty contacted by a friendly recruiter from Seattle, passed on to the hiring manager and had a first phone interview. First phone interview covered some simple coding questions using collabedit (a big improvement over verbally describing code!). It was apparent to me that I aced this interview, and indeed I did. So a second phone interview was set for the next week. In this interview I was asked one very difficult question which I was totally unprepared for -- I've never seen one like it before or since. I was pretty boggled by this question and made a crucial mistake, I just started coding it before really working out the algorithm. Recommendation: talk it out and describe the algorithm fully before you write any code! I did barely squeak through this interview and so was contacted by another friendly recruiter in Cupertino to setup an onsite interview in Cupertino the following week. Unfortunately the airfare got messed up (be sure to confirm air reservations within 24 hours even if its over the weekend!) so we pushed it back til the next week. The whole interviewing process stretched out over about 4 weeks. I studied coding questions intensively in preparation for the onsite interview, I should have prepared before the phone interviews too. This did serve me well in the onsite interview. Since I was flying from Florida and wanted to stay extra days to check out real estate, they were kind enough to book me two nights (they usually only do one). They also set me up for a rental car which I had to get reimbursed for. The hotel was very nice, literally right next to Lab126 building where I had my interviews, I was able to simply walk over there. Onsite interview involved 4 coding interviews (1 of which was by video since the guy was in Seattle) and then an interview with the manager of the team I was being interviewed for (while I wolfed down a mediocre sandwich from a catering company). I was out by 2PM, not quite the full day interview I've heard described by others. 3 of the 4 interviews were dead on, I answered the coding questions very well and in timely fashion and the interviewers gave me positive feedback. Unfortunately, the hard one was the bar raiser and I fumbled on that one a bit. This was a question about designing a reservation system for a restaurant -- obvioulsy impossible to code that in one hour. I think the key to these types of questions is to talk it out. My interview with the manager was hard to read, she wanted to know things like what other companies was I interviewing at, did I have any interest in management, etc. At the end I had a brief interview with HR person who was friendly. She wanted to talk about HR things like relocation, salary, etc. Ultimately I received a pretty standard corporate "No thanks" e-mail. For me, it was disappointing but probably just as well since the real estate in Silicon Valley area is ridiculously expensive! I was going to feel like I'd gotten a cut in pay given the salary I was likely to receive.

    Interview Questions

    • Write a function to allocated two dimensional rectangles within a larger area.   Answer Question
  9.  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online – interviewed at Amazon.com (Seattle, WA) in October 2012.

    Interview

    I had 2 Phone interviews followed by an Onsite interview. The phone interviews were straightforward, involving standard questions such as how to reverse a string. Also some questions on arrays, how to find if there are duplicates. Then there were questions related classes and polymorphism. Afterwards I had to email solution to a dictionary problem within the next day, which made use of STL data structures such as hash maps. The onsite interview was a pleasant experience. The hiring manager wanted to know my ambition and what I see myself doing in the team. The staff was a mix of strict interviewers who were opinionated and those who were open to my view point. I did not get good read of whether they were happy with my answers. I thought the interview went positive, however it came back negative.

    Interview Questions

    • Write code to iterate through a binary tree, delete a node from binary tree Write C++ code to support Rubik's cube solving What is model-view-controller paradigm? How will you deal with very large data set, especially those that does not fit into memory. What search techniques will you use?   Answer Question
  10. Helpful (5)  

    Senior Software Engineer/Software Development Engineer III Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through other source. The process took 2 weeksinterviewed at Amazon.com (Seattle, WA) in September 2012.

    Interview

    Standard hi-tech Interview process: 1. Phone Screen by a senior engineer asking basic softball CompSci questions like tree traversal (depth / bredth) and some linked list operations. Anyone at this level should be able to answer these questions easily. 2. In-Person Interview loop - 5 interviews, 45ish minutes each. Includes a lunch interview with the hiring manager and a Bar Raiser interview. Questions were fairly typical comp-sci questions: 1. Explain heaps and how they work. Write a bit of code to show you have a clue. 2. Standard Amazon STAR questions (behavioral, looking for their Leadership Principles). 3. Questions about networking, scaling-up vs scaling-out and so forth. 3. The Bar-Raiser asked a very tough algorithms questions. I approached this by asking him a number of clarifying questions and taking things very methodically.

    Negotiation

    We went back-and-forth several times on Salary, Signing Bonus, and Stock Awards. It was a fairly standard negotiation processes done mostly via email.

  11. Helpful (3)  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online – interviewed at Amazon.com (San Francisco, CA) in August 2012.

    Interview

    HR phone screen, online programming test, onsite interview

    Interview Questions

    • Given 2 strings find the common words along with the time and space complexity. How would you optimize the algorithm   3 Answers

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