Amazon.com Software Developer Intern Interview Questions

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1 person found this helpful  

Software Developer Intern Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Seattle, WA
Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
Application Details

I applied online. The process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in March 2013.

Interview Details

Applied through their careers site. After 2 weeks got a email from HR to schedule two back to back phone interviews.
Phone Interview 1-
Q1)How will you find if two elements exist in an array which add up to k.
Discussed the various approaches. He asked me to implement the HashMap approach on ColabEdit.
Q2) Define BST. Describe different approaches to determine whether a tree is BST.
Q3) How will you convert a string to Integer.
Phone Interview 2-
Q1) Write an algo to merge two ascending sorted LL in a descending manner.
Gave a recursive solution. Asked me to write a iterative version too.
Q2) Asked to give an overview of various sorting algorithms.

Interview Questions
Accepted Offer
Positive Experience
Average Interview

Other Interview Reviews for Amazon.com

  1.  

    Software Developer - Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2013.

    Interview Details

    One word: map. Know how to use it and its running times.

    Interview Questions
    • Detect a loop in a linked list.
      Otherwise, the other questions were all map related.
        Answer Question
    Reasons for Declining

    Got an offer from NASA which was more useful towards my goal.

    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview
  2.  

    Software Developer Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Houston, TX
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Houston, TX
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2013.

    Interview Details

    Two 45 minutes phone interviews, 15 mins apart. First interview went over some questions like describe a hard problem that you have solved and why you want to work in Amazon. Then there is a simple coding problem. The second interviewer asked questions on very basic data structures like trees, as well as another coding problem. The second interviewer was much nicer than the first one. The second interview went much better because I was given the option to type my code into the laptop, whereas I had to read out the code to the first interviewer.

    Interview Questions
    • The two coding problems are not hard at all. Both are can be solved with binary search, it's a bit redundant.   Answer Question
    • For me, the difficult part is describe a hard problem that I have solved. I wasn't prepared for that.   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    Did not negotiate
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  3. 1 person found this helpful  

    Software Developer Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  College Park, MD
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in College Park, MD
    Application Details

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 1 week - interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2013.

    Interview Details

    I had a friend hook me up with an interview from my university. I am a junior this year, and I don't believe that my resume would have gotten noticed otherwise. They came to my campus and conducted a 90 minute interview where two interviewers had me do 2 fairly difficult coding problems each (full out in my language of preference). I thought they weren't interested in me but heard back after one night that my interviewers were very impressed with me.

    Interview Questions
    • I had to implement a data structure for a last Least Recent Delete Cache and write relevant functions (it was a class for me since I used Java). Some functions included puts(Key key, Value value) and get(Key key). When I was stuck they helped me out.   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    haven't spoken with them yet about prices.
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview
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  5.  

    Software Developer Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Seattle, WA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2+ weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2013.

    Interview Details

    Submitting application online and about a week later was asked to schedule a phone interview. The interview consisted of two different calls each about 45 minutes long with a 15 minute break between them. The two callers were both very friendly and easy to understand. They were almost entirely technical in nature. Some questions were just explaining how you would solve a problem and some were writing code. Questions included how to implement C++ set insert and access functions, how to find if two numbers in an array sum to the same number and some object oriented design questions.

    Interview Questions
    • Design a data structure that has constant time pop, push, and constant minimum value of data currently in structure.   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    No negotiation.
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  6.  

    Software Developer Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Seattle, WA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Application Details

    I applied through college or university. The process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2013.

    Interview Details

    Applied online . Got interview call on-campus after a week or so, Two back to back interviews of 45 minutes. First interview was by the university alumni . He asked the following questions .
    1) Find the maximum sum subset for a given array .
    2) Given two sorted arrays find the elements of the first array not present in the second.
    3) Given a N*N array where N is even such as 4, 8 and so on . Print the array from the center.

    a= [1 2 3 4
           5 6 7 8
           9 10 11 12
           13 14 15 16]

    the output should be [6 10 12 7 3 2 1 5 9 13 14 15 16 12 8 4 ] .

    The interviewer gave me sufficient time to think about the problem and then gave some tips as thou how it can be solved . Then he told me to write the code .

    Second round of interview was very easy. the interviewer asked various question on the scenarios faced by amazon.

    Interview Questions
    • 3) Given a N*N array where N is even such as 4, 8 and so on . Print the array from the center.

      a= [1 2 3 4
             5 6 7 8
             9 10 11 12
             13 14 15 16]

      the output should be [6 10 12 7 3 2 1 5 9 13 14 15 16 12 8 4 ] .
        View Answers (3)
    Negotiation Details
    No negotitaion
    Accepted Offer
    Average Interview
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    Software Development Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Seattle, WA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2+ weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in December 2012.

    Interview Details

    I applied to Amazon on their website and was contacted via email to set up two 45-minute technical interviews.

    Each ended up lasting about an hour, and involved a few personal questions (e.g. tell me about a difficult problem you encountered and how you solved it, what's your favorite data structure) followed by short-answer technical questions (e.g. what is a hash table), and finally a programming problem. I was asked to code live on a code collaboration website, and was allowed to pick my preferred language.

    The coding questions were fairly simple - they don't try to hit you with anything you haven't seen before. One involved searching a linked list, then adding the possibility of duplicates, then detecting whether the list looped.

    The interviewers are very nice - they are not out to trick you and will nudge you in the right direction if you get stuck.

    Interview Questions
    • Given a linked list, find a key value and how many times it occurs. Include the possibility of a loop.   Answer Question
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  8.  

    Software Developer Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Baton Rouge, LA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Baton Rouge, LA
    Application Details

    I applied online - interviewed at Amazon.com in March 2011.

    Interview Details

    I was initially contacted via email. They set up two forty-five minute interviews with me. Both interviewers began by asking me to describe a project I had worked on that I enjoyed or was proud of before moving on to more technical questions.

    Interview Questions
    • Create a card game in Java. Say basic poker rules. Use whatever classes you see fit.   Answer Question
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  9.  

    Software Development Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Seattle, WA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Application Details

    The process took 3 weeks - interviewed at Amazon.com in February 2012.

    Interview Details

    Amazon posted an intern offer on my school career website. I submitted my resume, was contact about 2 weeks later to schedule two 45 minute phone interview. First interview I was asked about to describe projects on my resume, then was asked to list off some data structures. Asked to list all the sorting algorithms I could think of (only listed mergesort, quicksort) and then was asked if I knew the runtimes of these. Then was a coding question which I can't remember, something to do with strings. I had to read it aloud back to him. Asked how I could improve it and the runtime. Then asked about object oriented programming and how I would represent a card game and which methods it would need. The interview ended with me asking questions. The second interview was with someone with a heavier Indian accent, he said he was a tester. He asked me the difference between an arraylist and linked list, then to write a program on paper, I cant remember what it was exactly. I was then asked how I would test the program and if there were bugs how I would deal with them. Then asked about polymorphism and inheritance. Interview ended with me asking questions. I was contacted about a week later to schedule a 3rd phone interview and they actually apologized that I had to have one. Had the interview a week later and right off the bat was asked only one programming question. It was how to find a subset in a string. I had to describe the runtime. The interview was only a half hour I believe and it ended with me just talking to the guy, he had been working there for 7 years and knew someone else who had for 13 years. Asked about the pagers, etc. The day after I was offered an acceptance. To tell the truth, I thought I ruined my chance with all interviews. I answered runtimes wrong, and admitted I didn't remember what polymorphism was. So I was very surprised that I had an offer for another interview. I also thought I ruined the 3rd interview because it took em a very long time to figure the answer--and I don't even know if i got the right answer in the end, because the interviewer had to help me. The main key is to EXPLAIN YOURSELF. I said I had difficulty with things, and how I would TRY to program it or fix it and just talked it out while I was writing it. It really helps to show how you think ,which I guess they liked in my case!

    Interview Questions
    • Find a subset string specified in a big string.   View Answer
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

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