Facebook
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www.facebook.com Menlo Park, CA 5000+ Employees

Facebook Interview Questions & Reviews

Updated Apr 6, 2014
All Interviews Received Offers

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Interview Experience 

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4%

Interview Difficulty 

222 candidate interviews Back to all interview questions
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Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Difficult Interview

IOS Software Engineer Interview

Anonymous Employee
Menlo Park, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 5 weeks - interviewed at Facebook in December 2013.

Interview Details – While I was planning to look actively for a job in the next weeks, I have been first contacted by a Facebook recruiter (an employee, not a 3rd party company) on LinkedIn – I never really thought about Facebook at first, maybe because I imagined it was an unreachable goal. We scheduled a first phone screen: it was short, about 10 minutes, I said a bit of my background, he explained what Facebook is looking for an a bit of the recruiting process. After asking me 3 very easy Objective-C and iOS programming questions, he said he would like to schedule a phone interview with an Facebook engineer for me. 2 weeks later (he apologized for the long delay, I guess it's usually quicker) I had a phone interview. An engineer interviewed me, spending the first 10 minutes chatting of my background, interests and goals, then a 30 minutes peer-coding questions. As usual it was an algorithmic question, to solve in Objective-C / CoreFoundation (NSString, NSArray, NS* APIs...). She said I'll be contacted again by a recruiter in the next few days. I got a call, the recruited said I'm welcome to come on-site for a day of interviews. I gladly accepted. I then started to think I have some decent chances to get a job at this awesome company. The big day coming, I was very excited and relaxed too. I took a BART from the city and then a cab to the Menlo Park HQ. The recruited warmly welcomed me, we took some coffee, and chatted waiting for the first engineer / interviewer. The 4 interviews are as described on Facebook Careers website. First interviewer chatted a bit of my previous projects and then we had a technical question, involving iOS general knowledge, Objective-C skills, etc. Second interviewer spent most of time chatting of my previous projects, my goals, what I would like to change at Facebook if I was working here; and then we moved to a quick technical question. Then it was lunch time. I was really excited about going to visit the campus, get some good lunch and see how Facebookers are during lunch time. Many bring their MacBooks at lunch, have some fun with colleagues, and enjoy their meals. The lunch time was spent with the recruiter. After he brought me back to the interview room, the 2 next interviews were mostly algorithmic questions. Overall, I found the questions of an average level. Some iOS knowledge is required, some good sense of algorithmic, and remembering Objective-C syntax. Many says, and it's true, that unlike other companies, Facebook likes people who can code on a whiteboard with the correct syntax. It happened that I forgot a ; or wrote @implement instead of @interface. The interviewer asked me if I was sure about my syntax, I read again my code, and found my mistake. They are never (at least very rarely) misleading you. If they say "read again" it probably means "there is a syntax error, find it it's a bonus". A few days later, I got an email and then call from the recruiter who said he got very positive feedback from the interviews so he would like me to gather and send him some reference letters. So I did. A few days later, I got a call and was told I got an offer. It was a very good one.
Overall, the whole process was of course stressful, but very exciting and all interviews were in a very very relaxed atmosphere. It was like chatting with new colleagues, and trying to solve together a problem.

Interview Questions

  • I don't want to disclose the exact question (not only because of the NDA I signed, but because it won't be fun if you have this exact same question, and it won't help you anyways I think).   Answer Question
  • One question 3 of the interviewers asked me was "What was the most difficult thing you had to deal with.".   View Answers (5)

Negotiation Details – The offer was much higher than expected. I accepted without negotiation.

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Product Designer Interview

Anonymous Employee
New York, NY

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Facebook.

Interview Details – I was initially contacted by a recruiter then screened by him for 45 minutes. After that 2 other 45 minute phone calls, one reviewing a popular app the other going over my work. I was then asked to fly out to Menlo Park and spend a day at FB HQ where I first presented my work to the group that would then individually interview me for about 45 minutes each.

Everyone was extremely friendly and insightful. I actually had a great time talking design with everyone involved, it was like chatting design with close friends. They were very prepared and helped me be myself the whole time through. I would suggest to get tons of rest the night before, excitement can get exhausting towards the end.

Interview Question – They will ask you to design a very simple thing. Be prepared to innovate on the spot.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – The recruiter is your bff.

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1 person found this helpful

Declined Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Senior Software Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Menlo Park, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 3 weeks - interviewed at Facebook in November 2012.

Interview Details – Facebook recruiters approached me at a conference. Interview followed shortly thereafter; all interviewers had looked at my resume and were ready to ask me questions about my grad work, something that I didn't see in a lot of places. They even put me on the phone with their VP of data infrastructure, which was something that I wouldn't really expect from a company their size. Overall, a great process.

Interview Question – I got some fairly detailed questioning on my research, which was something I didn't really expect for a technical interview.   Answer Question

Reason for Declining – I found a position at a startup, and the opportunity cost of turning the startup down for a more established company was too high.

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Neutral Experience

Difficult Interview

Data Engineer Interview

Anonymous Employee
Menlo Park, CA

I interviewed at Facebook in March 2014.

Interview Details – So i had 4 back to back interviews with all managers. The interviews were all extremely technical and the interviewers were pretty straight forward, weren't excessively nice or mean.
The interview went through lunch hour and they din't offer me lunch and I was so hungry through half af all my interviews which kinda sucked.

Interview Question – A lot of SQL questions. General knowledge about how you would handle large amounts of data.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – Extremely straightforward. The recruiter was extremely nice and I tried to negotiate but I couldn't because the offer was already pretty up there.

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Declined Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Data Scientist Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Menlo Park, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took a day - interviewed at Facebook in March 2014.

Interview Details – I was first contacted by a sourcer for a different position, but the recruiter that she connected me to never replied my email. A few months passed, I received an offer from another company so I thought I'd check in with the recruiter again. He emailed back, but ultimately the position he was recruiting for wasn't a good fit. He passed me to a second recruiter, who's super efficient in terms of both scheduling and getting back to me with the results. It took him literally less than 24 hours from the beginning of my interview to get me a verbal offer. Super impressive.

For the onsite, there were 5 back-to-back 30-min interviews. It was quite intense, and a lot of talking. They should've fit a 5 min break here and there, but oh well. There's a few algorithm questions, stats, design, research background, etc.

Interview Question – It was all a blur to me now. I don't think there was anything too difficult in particular, but lots of talking and have to focus since all interviews were back-to-back.   Answer Question

Reason for Declining – It was a very tough decision. Honestly, could've gone either way. Facebook's offer was a tad bit higher, but I thought I'd give the other company a shot for now.

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Difficult Interview

Production Engineer Interview

Anonymous Employee
Menlo Park, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Facebook in March 2014.

Interview Details – Was initially contacted via LinkedIn by an internal Facebook recruiter that dealt specifically with this role. I was impressed with the recruiter's technical knowledge, always a good sign, and agreed to go through the screening and start the interview process.

The process is 5 steps:

* Call with recruiter about position
* Phone screening with a few trivia questions regarding systems administration.
* Co-operative coding phone interview
* Systems phone interview
* On-Site interview

The call with the recruiter was mostly about the position description and duties, and assessing whether both sides think it's a good fit. The phone screening, also done with the recruiter, is just a few questions that anyone who has administered Linux for an organization would be able to answer off the top of their head.

The coding interview was done using a collaborative editing tool, so both parties could see what was being typed. The coding questions were not your typical abstract data manipulation questions, but rather questions that required systems knowledge, and in my case were most easily answered with shell scripts.

I didn't actually do the systems phone interview, as they considered my programming interview strong enough to simply skip this step. I'm informed this is not uncommon.

The on-site interview loop included five 45-minute segments: Programming, Systems, Networking, Solution Architecture, and meeting with the Manager (not in that order). Additionally, lunch with the initial recruiter and a brief chat afterwards with a different recruiter that dealt with the financial and logistics portions of the interview and negotiations.

One thing that struck me during the entire process is that *everyone* I spoke to, and I mean *everyone* because I asked them all, absolutely loved working there. Every time I asked someone how they liked working at Facebook, their face lit up and they started listing off reasons they loved working there, and everyone had the same reason: They liked everyone around them, felt trusted and respected, and trusted and respected the people around them. This was unanimously the first reason, usually followed by "and the work is really interesting".

Interview Question – What options do you have, nefarious or otherwise, to stop people on a wireless network you are also on (but have no admin rights to) from hogging bandwidth by streaming videos?   View Answer

Negotiation Details – My negotiations were all pre-offer. There is a compensation department that comes up with an offer based on your years of experience, strength during the interview process, and current pay. They will almost certainly exceed your current pay if you disclose it, though I should probably point out they didn't verify mine. In my case they offered base pay approximately 10% higher than my prior base pay, and I presume this is fairly standard.

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Accepted Offer

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Difficult Interview

Software Engineer Intern Interview

Anonymous Employee

I applied through college or university and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Facebook in February 2014.

Interview Details – Reached out recruiter on campus career fair. Got campus interview and later on-site interview. Since I had another pending offer deadline before the on-site interview date, they rescheduled the on-site interview via phone (which is a pity). The on campus interview (45min) only had one question on whiteboard I made it smoothly. The phone interview, however had two questions in 45min. I spent 30 mins on the first one and didn't finished the second question, but the interviewer was super nice! He gave me some hints on the second one and discussed with me about the question when I knew I already ran out of time. He even answered my question patiently. I had a pending offer deadline and requested a quick feedback, and two days later I got the offer! That was awesome since I didn't expect to get it at first.

Interview Question – The phone interview was kind hard and none of them appeared one leetcode etc. But do not stress out since engineers are friendly and helpful.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – No negotiation. They were super nice people.

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Software Engineer Intern Interview

Anonymous Employee

I applied through college or university and the process took 1 week - interviewed at Facebook.

Interview Details – Two interviews, back to back, 30 minutes each. They were reasonably difficult, but nothing too difficult. Given the time constraint, it can be very hard to through all the questions. Post-interview however, the recruiter took us out to dinner.

Interview Question – Typical types of tree questions, such as finding the maximum tree length, closest path to various sets of nodes, along with being able to detect levels of all nodes as efficiently as possible.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – No negotiation for internships

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1 person found this helpful

Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Intern Interview

Intern

I applied through college or university and the process took 2 days - interviewed at Facebook.

Interview Details – On campus interview

Interview Question – Given a list of strings, return a list of lists, where each list consists of words that are anagrams." Example: Given ["cab", "cz", "abc", "bca", "zc"] the output should be: [ [ "abc", "bca", "cab"] , [ "zc", cz"]].   View Answer

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Accepted Offer

Neutral Experience

Intern Interview

Intern

I applied through college or university and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Facebook.

Interview Details – I've submitted my resume during one of the career fairs, and my recruiter emailed me back within a month. I had two interviews at school on two different days, and the decision was emailed back to me within a week. From then on, I was connected with a recruiter, who scheduled my flight and asked about my preferences...

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