GoDaddy

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GoDaddy Reviews

Updated Jun 27, 2014
All Employees Current Employees Only

3.1 241 reviews

68% Approve of the CEO

GoDaddy CEO Blake Irving

Blake Irving

(84 ratings)

51% of employees recommend this company to a friend

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Great Benefits (Although it will take you at least 90 days to get them)(in 24 reviews)

  • Good hourly base pay, good benefits if you're single(in 24 reviews)


Cons
  • Transitioning from the call center to corporate is extremely difficult to do(in 18 reviews)

  • Though, given the amount of time it's been since I was there - that may have changed(in 6 reviews)

43 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews
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    2 people found this helpful  

    Boring..

    Technical Support & Sales (Current Employee) Scottsdale, AZ

    ProsYou get some free domains, and hosting. You get a lot of respect.

    ConsEverything is a letdown, their PCs are outdated, managers talk to you like you're nothing.

    Advice to Senior ManagementTo respect us

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
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    3 people found this helpful  

    Go Daddy - A great place to work...unless you're an employee in their janitorial, facilities or security departments.

    Safety and Security Specialist (Current Employee) Hiawatha, IA

    Pros- Excellent pay and benefits.
    - Work with friendly people.
    - Catered lunch every week day.

    Cons- The management makes inexplicable, moronic decisions and doesn't offer any explanations for them.
    - It takes FOREVER for the company to do ANYTHING.
    - The company wastes so much money doing unnecessary things. XBox One and Nintendo Wii U in all the break rooms is nice but...seriously? How about you keep those and hand out those yearly bonuses you stiffed my department on last year?
    - Treatment of employees is completely unbalanced. Office and call center works are treated fantastically. If you're a member of the company's security or facilities team, you can go screw yourself. If you work for security at Go Daddy, you will do the exact same job (and more) as someone who works in guest services. But guess what? Guest services employees get yearly bonuses and other perks. What does security get? Nothing.
    - Go Daddy is run by a bunch of damn hypocrites. They're supposedly all about empowering small businesses. But I've seen them boot out multiple small businesses who did contract work from them and outsource that work to one big corporation.
    - Suggestions and issues you go to management about are ignored.
    - There is a complete lack of direction from Go Daddy management. I've been here I while now and I'm still not completely clear one my responsibilities. Management doesn't seem to really know either.

    Advice to Senior ManagementThanks for outsourcing my department, Go Daddy management. Really makes me feel like a valued member of the Go Daddy team.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
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    • Approves of CEO

    5 people found this helpful  

    So incredibly frustrating

    Sadly, afraid to say... (Current Employee) Scottsdale, AZ

    ProsGo Daddy has an unlimited vacation policy, their managers takes their teams out once a quarter for team building, decent benefits. Pay (if you are coming from the outside) is pretty solid, though raises are anemic at best. The new review system should remove the much-hated bell curve scoring process. Some managers are still trying to make things work. The CEO is rock-solid and absolutely believes in GD and knows what we need to do to make it awesome....but....

    Cons- There is NO communication between the Senior Leaders. Those leaders then tell us what they want done, but don't spend the time, energy, money, or provide direction on how those things should happen. It doesn't get better moving down the ladder from there.
    - No environmental standardization, little testing, and too much work to do
    - Company is trying to go public. This means no money for anything. This will only get worse as we get closer to that acrid goal.
    - Work life balance is non-existent in my department. My boss expects an answer any time, day or night. Emails are often sent at 9am, and you'll get questioned about why you've not answered them already.
    - Promotions are non-existent company-wide. The company has hired externally almost exclusively for the last year.
    - "Old School" Go Daddy folks (people that have been here more than 5-7 years) will push you to cut corners. Any pushback and you'll be labeled as "not agile".
    - Developers rule this place. Any other teams are secondary at best.
    - Environment of fear. If you cause an outage, expect you'll be terminated for something unrelated not long afterwards.
    - Change control team were all terminated, so little in the way of controls
    - Monitoring team was gutted, so very little monitoring or alerting

    Advice to Senior ManagementStop rewarding cut corners. If you don't invest in the guts of your company, you can't be surprised when they break. If you don't invest in your people's well being, you can't be surprised then they leave. Stop giving us the end result and start telling us how, exactly, we will get there. Just saying you want something to happen doesn't make it appear out of thin air.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

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    1 person found this helpful  

    Good people, poor management

    Software QA (Former Employee)

    ProsReally loved the team I worked with, but the management was extremely deceptive.

    ConsPoor people management skills, for those brought in after the acquisition.

    Advice to Senior ManagementIf the management is the problem, how could any advice here matter?

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
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    • Disapproves of CEO

     

    Time to move on; very disappointing.

    Software Engineer (Former Employee) Denver, CO

    ProsIf you like working in a fun, fast-pace environment, for an Internet leader, GoDaddy may be the place for you. There is a lot of opportunity to learn, and contribute new ideas. Old management, under Bob Parsons had a "get 'er done" kind of attitude. They were very collaborative, very much a team oriented mentality. In many ways, this still exists, but this appears to be fading. Still, GoDaddy does a lot for their employees, at least for now. Benefits are generally good, not stellar; pay is on the low end of respectable. They offer a lot of nice perks, like free lunches, quarterly team-building outings, an unlimited flexible time off policy, and the most epic company holiday party you will ever witness! Bob Parsons was the most dynamic, hard-nosed, demanding, generous, fun guy I ever worked for. I miss the Bob Parsons GoDaddy.

    ConsA year ago, I would have rated 5 stars and been hard pressed to write more than a sentence here. Today however, is a totally different GoDaddy. The new focus of the company is on preparing to "go public". Perception to the market is much more important than substance of character. The new regime, hand-picked by, and including the new CEO Blake Irving, have zero respect for the established employees. The people who grew the company into one worthy of being bought, and now in a position to go public, are completely disposable. This talks to loyalty, of which there is none. You will be much more valued as an employee if you start now, than if you were hired under Bob Parsons.

    Blake Irving is a fun guy on the outside, and tries to be what Bob Parsons is, but he will never be what Bob Parsons is. He is from California, and is desperate to move the company HQ there. I predict this will eventually happen, even though most smart companies are fleeing the state. He is also dead-set on building what he has termed "centers of excellence" on the west coast nearer the other big Internet players. Rather than continue to be the company that stands out and kills it on their own, he wants to blend in with the popular crowd; again this is strictly for perception. The people being hired at these new locations are surely very talented, no doubt, but no better than what GoDaddy already has in Arizona, Iowa, and Colorado, and it is a total slap in the face to hear from executive management that you are not "excellent" simply because you don't live in Seattle or Sunnyvale. If you are a technical resource working in Iowa or Arizona, your position is most likely in jeopardy as well. Not eminently, but eventually those "centers of excellence" will be where you need to be to succeed, and you will be pressured to move there, if not told you must, to keep your job, as most in Denver were. If you are working in a call center, your job is most likely secure, but don't expect to move up from there.

    When starting at GoDaddy, negotiate the absolute highest salary you can, as you will not get more than a cost of living raise ever. They spend an inordinate amount of time on HR processes and studies only to throw much of the data away; again perception. I really do like the CPO - Auguste Goldman. Coincidentally he is an old regime guy, and my guess is he often doesn't get to do what he would like to do.

    Advice to Senior ManagementLoyalty to your employees is not just a buzzword. Holiday party aside, the other 364 days of the year matter! Actually using your MBA means knowing re-orgs, re-structuring, and downsizing (especially when there is no economic need,) are the tools of the incompetent. Growing a company does NOT involve cutting off one of your arms when things are going well. Moving people around and closing down offices for no reason, makes you look like you don't know what you're doing. It really is too bad that in this industry, CEO's can make wildly bad decisions and still succeed. GoDaddy will surely survive, but could have done so much better had you stayed awake in class.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
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    2 people found this helpful  

    Best place to work while Bob Parsons led the company

    Software Development (Former Employee) Hiawatha, IA

    ProsMy rating went from a 5 to a 2 in the last 3 years. While Bob ran the show, you truly felt valued as a an employee. You felt like you were an important part of delivering value to the highly valued customer. You were also encouraged to come up with new product concepts based on your experience in the marketplace and suggest ways to improve existing products. Team pride in delivering value to customers and having fun were the highest priorities. Every year the company flew-in all who were directly involved with software development for an annual TechFest in Arizona. This was an awesome opportunity to meet people in person whom you only had electronic interactions with. It was also a wonderful learning/collaoboration opportunity. Peers presented exciting new technology and provided resources for future use. There were so many valuable presentations that you could not attend them all. Eventually the presentations were captured via digital video so you could access them from the company intranet site.

    ConsOnce KKR started to drive the company more and Bob Parsons faded away to the Board of Directors, uncertainty drove a dog eat dog culture. Directors in different geographic locations became more concerned about building their corner of the company and less concerned about delivering value to the customer. Re-orgs occurred more frequently and some new managers did some pretty shady things to end careers of great people. Some employees were even reprimanded for using their free time to take part in company-sponsored new product idea submission opportunities.

    Advice to Senior ManagementRe-instate Bob's 16 rules, get rid of managers who operate unethically and stop managing by fear.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

     

    Intense atmosphere

    Inbound Sales and Support (Former Employee) Gilbert, AZ

    ProsThe company does a great job of offering lots of prizes and incentives.

    ConsI felt like I was working in the cube farm.

    • Culture & Values
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    1 person found this helpful  

    Good job to fill a temporary void but don't expect to advance or not have to sell your soul

    Professional Hosting Services (Current Employee) Gilbert, AZ

    ProsGreat pay! Great Benefits! In recent times they have allowed more wiggle room to advance into different departments as well.

    ConsHigh sales expectations. If you do not sale you will get fired. Company put more strict guidelines that make it harder to make a "bonus" and have a person stay on the phone for their whole shift minus a lunch and break. Unless you are a natural born salesperson I wouldn't reccomend this job to you

    Advice to Senior ManagementManagement is really caring but I believe that the days of saying making a certain sales numbers or get fired are over. Also open more job positions that don't require sales. If people seen that there was a future with GoDaddy they might not quit or get discouraged showing up to a futureless job.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
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    • Approves of CEO

    7 people found this helpful  

    Great benefits, frustrating culture

    Senior .NET Developer (Former Employee) Scottsdale, AZ

    ProsGoDaddy was an exciting place to work. The benefits (vacations, medical, etc) were among the best of any company in the nation. I got an MSDN account. The pay was very competitive. The Christmas party was always spectacular. And in my team's case the quarterly team bonding experience was pretty nice. Most of the more general organizational facets of the company such as the HR orientation process, IT getting software installed, and having a system of collaboration were pretty solid. Celebrating its successes, GoDaddy was full of surprises. One time they even brought a marching band to stomp through the offices while we were working.

    ConsAll the pros don't make up for how frustrating the experience was for me as a developer.

    The company grew a few years ago very, very fast, so people who had no business being in senior management--some of whom were incredibly crass in demeanor and somehow that looked good on them to the top brass--ended up in senior management, and people who were already in senior management likewise had their egos stroked in seeing the company explode in success those years ago. Technical executives had very little technical understanding of the technical decisions they regularly made. There seemed to be little appreciation among the leadership for practicing humility. One week I sat in a room adjacent to a very senior technical executive and he would be yelling cuss words at the top of his lungs all day long, apparently in "conversations" with people on the phone.

    We had desktop computers, no laptops, as we were adamantly discouraged from taking our work home (although we could remote in from our personal computers at home at night).

    The internal enforcement of security was an absolute nightmare, probably the worst part of the experience of working there. I couldn't even so much as check for current drivers for my computer on Dell's web site without the head of security e-mailing me asking me what the heck I was doing on Dell's FTP server. Social networks like Facebook were banned, any attempts to try to access caused an alert to a senior manager. Visiting the call center with an iPad or other laptop/tablet device in hand would get me stopped at the door as some security jerk would start yelling at me red-faced for attempting to enter the call center with such a device in hand, even though I was entering to meet with individuals who were going to be working with me to develop software for said device.

    All outgoing e-mails even to HR were closely monitored by my own boss.

    The amount of red tape and waiting involved in setting up servers and the impossibility of arranging for a debugging environment that more than slightly approximates just one of the production servers made it impossible to produce a stable product. I had to beg for many months, well over a year, to upgrade my workstation computer from Windows XP, even as we were developing locally but deploying the product to Windows Server 2008 (at the time).

    Bugs we had triaged were piling up but every time a new set of bugs were found by customer service *those* bugs ended up taking priority. Older bugs rarely got fixed and architectural design flaws that created so many bugs to begin with couldn't be readily addressed. Refactoring was completely disallowed; the biases of QA managed the development decisions and not the other way around.

    Egos both among senior management and among developers who had seniority was overwhelming; one group of developers had a hissy fit that our team was not using their several years old, home-grown, undocumented data architecture, built for another time and even under an old abandoned company name.

    The usual rules of brown-nosing and very long term seniority were the only means to see the hope of climbing a ladder. Most people who were actually "senior" were employees before the company's big boom, and that was it, no more promotions to be had, promotion is not measured on whether you know your stuff and/or can lead well but rather whether you were there in those early days and/or you kiss up well. Most leadership role opportunities were made by someone being promoted or fired and were usually filled by in-house candidates on the basis of being "yes men".

    Advice to Senior ManagementSeparate your call centers from the other work forces. Separate them both physically and in how they are treated. Call centers might hire near-minimum-wage workers, but developers who are already approaching or have reached six digit salaries do not need to be treated like criminals; seriously, lighten [the hell] up on the security and Big Brother behavior.

    Let those who are hired to be technically minded make the technical decisions and stop getting in their way; better yet, learn more, a lot more, about the technology they are paid to utilize and implement so that whatever decisions you do make don't make you look like a total jackass.

    QA's job is to validate the work of the developer, not to make development decisions; don't let QA block developers from refactoring code; rather, work with the team to ensure that clean-ups and code improvements are palatable, and encourage developers to apply basic refactoring conventions in the areas of code they are tasked to work in.

    Give employees a private channel of communication to HR free from bosses' perusal such as a web page with a textarea input that is a truly secured message.
    HR: In addition to providing a truly respectable secure channel of employee communication regarding their bosses, give complaining employees more advice for interpersonal and professional success rather than proxying the complaint to the boss or responding with publishing more rules and regulations. Also, the last buck in hiring stops with you, stop allowing unqualified personnel to climb the ladder and sit in roles they have no business sitting in.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
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    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Disapproves of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Not so good.

    Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)

    ProsDecent benefits, flexibility if corporate job

    Consno advancement opportunity, upper management doesn't care about employees

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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