Hewlett-Packard

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Hewlett-Packard Reviews

Updated November 24, 2014
Updated November 24, 2014
9,335 Reviews
3.3
9,335 Reviews
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Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman
Meg Whitman
3,621 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Decent work-life balance due to flexibility of work schedule but that's about it (in 1209 reviews)

  • Being able to work from home is also great so you are never behind in work (in 684 reviews)


Cons
  • Work/life balance was horrible: meetings early in the morning or late at night (in 211 reviews)

  • You can hear people want to fix issues but the senior management just doesn't get it (in 319 reviews)

More Highlights

1,010 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Had great expectations of a long relationship with HP as a trusted contractor and future employee but did not happen...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Devops Engineer in San Diego, CA
    Former Employee - Devops Engineer in San Diego, CA

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Had a national contract company hit me up for this cool sounding uber printer product / project at HP in San Diego. Went and interviewed with the product team. Direct manager I would work for seems to be trying really hard to be patient during the interview and to be nice. That was a red flag. But I disregarded it.

     A one month long required background check by the contract company ensued whereas I had to provide W2's and IRS tax returns back 10 years to prove income and employment. And sadly, this was a precursor to the real experience. I almost told the contract company to forget it as the background check was worse then even a government security check I had.

    Was unclear if the background check was required by HP or the contract company. Totally unreasonable.
    Spent about 10 to 20 hours locating documents for the background check. Had to even get documents - W2's from the IRS to prove wages. For a background check.

    That was my 2nd sign to pull the rip cord and eject from the cockpit.
    I did not.

    I hung on.

    It did not get better.

    On the first day at HP in San Diego I was put into a cube with two desks in it. And I was told a new contractor would start in two weeks and share the opposite desk in my cube.

    I am like - thank goodness that guy is not here yet. I don't need to train that guy when I am just starting a new job.

    On the first week I was digging through the other desk in my cube. Figured I would throw out all the old food and junk in the desk. Found a box with a UPS shipping label with this guys name on it. Humm, so this guy used to sit here. Wonder who he is?

    Box had a ship date on it only a month ago.

    I asked my trainer (who had left and gone to another HP location) who the guy was with his name on the box.
    "Oh don't worry about him. We fired him and he is gone". "He lasted three weeks".
    "He did not even know how to use a computer".. I am like WHAT?

    What kind of interview and selection process did they use on this guy?

    Uh oh. "I thought". This is "That kind of place"

     The first week of the job was learning by being trained by a remote expert on the cloud based product.

     The 2nd week I learned on my own. I found there was not a lot written down but all knowledge was tribal and kept in people's heads.

    At the end of the 2nd week I was approached by a contractor who worked in HP;s HR department.
    They said "We would like you to interview for a job".
    I said - "what job is that?"

    They described the job. "

    I said "This is my job. I am a contractor and I am already doing the job". I said "I already interviewed
    for this job a month and a half ago".

    And that is the last I heard from HP HR.
    Little did I know that this was an ominous sign that budget constraints had been triggered on my
    contract rate.

     On the third week another contractor joined the company and I had a cube mate. I found this new guy was snide and arrogant and would never be easy to work with. I found the age differential of 25 years would also be a problem as it is always assumed by younger technical folks that those with grey hair should just die off.

    When I asked this guy one question when he had been on the job 4 days and me 2 and a half weeks this guy barked: "you should have figured that out two weeks ago".

     How to work with someone already hostile who lives in your cube? And of course my cube mate believed in telling me as little as I needed to know. Fine. Guess he is a team player.
    I figure my ex cube mate will get tripped up by his personality eventually at HP. Just a matter of time.

     My third week had intense training. At the end of the third week, HP HR approached me about "interviews". on Friday.
    I told HP HR "Interviews"? For what job? HP full time job? That's fine but I am already hired and working in that job capacity....
    Already interviewed.

    And after three weeks, the employer still will not know if you are a good fit or not. Takes months...

    I am thinking - "Well, never heard this was coming". Contract company claimed no knowledge of this.

    And dear readers - it gets even more strange:

    One the 4th week around 2pm I am summoned by my boss into a private Focus room. I am told "You are the most expensive contractor on the team". I was told that my contract rate and expense "has visibility up and down the entire HP management executive chain". I am further told I must LEAD the product cloud effort. After that pleasant warning, I ramp up my work and activity to the max.

    But from this time I had my game face on.
    I am no longer nice.
    I have nothing to lose.

     The next day I tell the boss that I have added more stories to the Agile Pivotal tracker and completed them. I am given a large responsibility which I had never done as this was my 4th week and of course the Capristrano deploy commands break due to my account not being added to some LDAP authorization.

     On Friday my time was up The boss did not get enough velocity in 1.5 days since his warning.

    Or did my cube mate throw me under the bus?
    I'll never know.

    Contracting is dog eat dog. Perhaps he figured it was his survival at HP vs mine.

    Contract company would provide no explanation.

    But HP fired the guy before me in the same role. At the same desk.
    Past behaviour predicts future actions.

    Time to leave.

     Bruised ego. But don't miss hostile co worker in my cube or boss making mean faces when I talk to him.

    Too bad I signed a lease on a new house to rent - that I am not even moved into yet - just because this job came up
    Thanks HP. Now I have $4,500 house deposit I will not get back as I probably have to leave San Diego now.
     I figured HP had just a little more integrity.

    In many ways HP was still the same place I had seen in my other times at HP as a contractor and as an employee.
    There were guys with grey hair doing their jobs, young people full of vibrancy. Really smart people.

    The campus is going through a compression as Building 65 is being decommissioned and all the people are being compressed into the other two remaining buildings - 61 and the other.
    Two in a cube will be the rule.

    Still it was cool to still see bits of the old HP around.
    The buildings seem really ancient now..

    HP is a huge company and has lots of resources.
    if you can get a job up the food chain a few levels, it would be a great place to work.

    It was fun to be at HP again.
    I was just hired into the wrong wrong group.

    Don't think I would ever want to go back to HP as en engineer ever again and never ever as a DEVops person.

    Cons

    If you are a contractor - know your contract rate may by under great scrutiny if your rate is too high.
    Management knew my rate when they hired me. And later decided the rate was too high for them.

    Two in a cube. You had better like who is in your cube. You have no choice.

    Office has fork lifts crawling along the perimeters.

    Noise noise noise. Marketing and product managers yap loudly and incessantly. It is so loud in the offices - they have FOCUS rooms where you can work in silent conditions.

    You need to put on headphones to drown out all the noise. Then you look antisocial to your team and not a team player.

    Arrogant and dysfunctional managers who would rather interview hasty and then fire you.

    No proper on-boarding for highly technical / social jobs. Not much written down which is up to date.
    Not much written down at all.

    If you get a bad manager at HP - you'll not have a happy life.

    If you like Agile - then fine.

    But like High school home room attendance - Agile requires you to be at a daily Standup meeting.
    If you miss that meeting - heaven help you.

    Have a doctors appt or even two of them? Good luck with getting permission to leave the office.
    Better off just going to the doctor and taking your chances.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Don't rely entirely on Agile.
    Bill and Dave did not use Agile or need it.
    Agile is a passing fad, results in no documentation and sloppy throw it against the wall and see if it sticks design.

    Put your management through required sensitivity training toward contractor and your reports. You sorely need it.

    Put managers through training on HOW to manage and be good managers and not nasty.

    Refine your interview process.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Aweful place to work. No training and bad management.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Business Planning Analyst II in Houston, TX
    Current Employee - Business Planning Analyst II in Houston, TX

    I have been working at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Work Experience. First Buyer job out of college

    Cons

    Had to self training and figure out my job on my own.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Train

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3. 2 people found this helpful  

    many good years. but not since the company was lead by the shareholders. employees live in fear that they might be next

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Engineer
    Former Employee - Engineer

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    cool products. and you get to practice your language skills training your teammates. products are manufactured around the world. HP has an amazing supply chain.

    Cons

    there is no such thing as a people manager or HR department to assist the employee. employees live in FEAR that they might be next to be work forced reduced.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    get to know your employees. look them in the eye at least once/year. don't just focus on the black and white. there is a lot lost in the gray areas. cheaper does not mean better. watch the quality of product very closely-you are at risk as you walk the experience out the door. and be prepared for the employees you just hired to not stick around.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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  5. 2 people found this helpful  

    HP needs to really "Make it Matter"

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Manager in Los Angeles, CA

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    There are some solid managers and leaders particularly in finance. As an entry level job, it might be a good place to start. Career longevity is not common at HP anymore.

    Cons

    Not many right now. The environment is not stable, so career longevity is uncertain. The company favors younger, cheaper workers especially at the management level. There is a continued emphasis to reduce the number of senior workers as well as jobs in the US. Layoffs in the US are not uncommon while the company will list a more junior position in another country at one the hub locations. The opportunity to work from home where there are no HP locations is no longer an option, particularly in the Tech and Operations function. The culture is supposed to be an ethical environment with annual training. Yet management does not always support ethical positions especially when the pressure to produce results creates a toxic environment.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Meg, you have people in your organization that are just looking out for themselves rather than for the best interests of the company. The environment is toxic in some areas and employees at the VP level on down are back stabbing others for the benefit of their own careers.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  6. 3 people found this helpful  

    Fails to address root problems and promotes bad culture and behaviors at the senior levels

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    There were some very talented individuals but they are quickly leaving as the company does not value them. There is a lot of potential given the breadth of technology patents available.

    Cons

    The company failed to integrate culturally. Employees have sub-cultures aligned with Compaq vs. pre-merger or any other company purchased. Culture is also very bureaucratic. One must spend more time looking good and managing up to remain relevant rather than accomplishing the work needed to keep the company relevant. CIO's are fighting a sizable war within the company for power while the business remains complacent and ineffective. Very little thought leadership or strategy and while everything may look good externally it is REAL different internally.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Fix the culture - Get around the leadership as they are part of the problem. Suggest meeting with IC's, Managers and Directors to understand the reality of challenges.
    Fix the internal conflict - There is too much time wasted doing CYA and all because there is no one ever held accountable. There are leaders who spin the truth just to buy another year or two and then move up while the reality of what was accomplished set the department and company back by another 2 years.
    Grow your business leaders - Too many of them have become complacent and lack understanding of the environment and capabilities that could be brought to market and what customers are seeking. There is too much time wasted executing poorly defined and improperly positioned efforts. There is no strategy and if there is it has not been properly communicated, managed or executed at every level.
    Splitting the company will help but your outsourcing model will fail you. The HP.com efforts will be paid for multiple times over. You have outsourced the creation of the site to a company that uses business graduates as developers. The code is in bad shape and the leaders are lying about where they are in the process. I suggest rethinking your strategy as the market has changed significantly and you are not even positioned to compete. Your consumer store should have just be serviced by the re sellers such as Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy, Costco and Sams. By doing so you would have focused on developing portlets to be consumed by these re-sellers. Then all focus should have been applied to developing a real B2B portal to service your corporate, public and high-touch customers. The current efforts have wasted more money and brain power than can be imagined. This will result with HP getting another ding in the press because of a faulty strategy executed by leaders who failed to admit when they were wrong and rather doubled down on the current path.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    A company on the decline, with a culture to match

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Vice President in Palo Alto, CA
    Former Employee - Vice President in Palo Alto, CA

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Old school company where many manage to have 9-5 jobs. Interesting breadth and depth of technology.

    Cons

    So many changes of direction and strategy it made your head spin. Unfortunately one of the most dysfunctional corporate cultures I have ever seen. Old timers clinging to the "old HP" that is long gone; newer people trying to shake things up without success. Benefits not competitive with other Valley companies--two years before 401(k) match vests (thank you Mark Hurd) and 2 weeks vacation to start.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Time is running out. Rather than the drip drip drip of layoffs, admit that the company (now the companies with recently announced split) has too many employees.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8. 6 people found this helpful  

    Layoffs and purges in search of the cheapest workforce

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - IT Manager in Sunnyvale, CA
    Current Employee - IT Manager in Sunnyvale, CA

    I have been working at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    There are parts of HP that are still functioning well, but they are getting fewer all the time. It will all depend on your local team, the further up the management chain and the more "Global" you go the more the dysfunction will manifest. It's a good place to get a start if you are a graduate and it has an almost mythological history. Meg is a good CEO with a clear vision.

    Cons

    HP has a forced ranking policy, every year managers are given quotas on what percentage is allowed to be in each of the 5 ratings you can be given in your review. HP swears it doesn't do this, it says success of the business is a factor it takes into account but it doesn't have quotas. I am a manager, I do the spreadsheets every year. I am told exactly how many of each rating I am allowed to have. If you are in a business seen as under-performing then there won't be more than 8% of the top ratings allowed, no matter what an employee achieved or how they performed. Amazingly, under-performing businesses still hand out big bonuses to the senior managers who are allegedly accountable for their businesses but the employees who do all the real work, often working long hours to compensate for the continuous layoffs, get forced ranking and no pay increases. Senior positions are nearly always filled externally, those managers then in turn hire their old buddies from wherever they came from themselves. Internal promotion is almost non-existent, the Job Searcher tool is incredibly difficult to use and hiring managers rarely reply to internal applicants. HP is trying hard to purge itself of its older workforce, who are seen as expensive and too opinionated. Hitting your 30 year anniversary in HP means you will be on the next WFR list if you won't take the hint and take phased retirement.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop the golden parachutes for executives and have them take real responsibility for the success of their businesses. The only accountable people in HP are the individual contributors who are routinely laid off after every bad business decision. The executive team suffers in from action imperative syndrome in trying to make Meg happy, if she leans towards having people back in the office rather than working from home, then her unsubtle followers make sure that 100% of the workforce will be in the office, no matter how many things that breaks. HP has some sensible ideas that are incredibly stupidly executed.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9. 4 people found this helpful  

    Dinosaur that is almost extinct.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Technology Consultant in Tulsa, OK
    Former Employee - Technology Consultant in Tulsa, OK

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Paycheck always hits the bank. Gender reassignment covered by insurance. I guess??

    Cons

    What can I say. HP had 80-90k employees in 2001 before the Compaq merger. Since then one merger after another each time they have destroyed the company and the business they took over. Now they have over 280K employees. The said thing is they have left over 100k employees in their wake. Layoffs in the magnitude of 20-30k at a time. One failed CEO after another. Carly Fiorina the beginning of the end. Mark Hurd - the hatchetman of Palo Alto. Then Leo the 10 month 11 million dollar man. Now Meg the write down queen. They have bleed eds customers since the take over losing close to half their business in 5 years. Destroyed palm and its Web Os. This is a sinking ship with giant holes but all they care about is diversions to make wall street happy.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Start taking care of your employees and not just stock holders and upper management. Quit saying there is no money when we still make billions in profit every year. The good talent leaves daily and will continue until there is nothing left but dead weight in this place.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  10. 3 people found this helpful  

    acquisition fallout

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    I liked my work and focused on that and away from other things.

    Cons

    I worked for a company HP acquired. Layoffs occurred on a continuous basis. Our manager was great and we had frequent impromptu meetings that allowed us to discuss the aftermath of "who is gone this time."

    One of those situations where one feels like the company has zero regard for you as an actual human being and 100% regard for you as a commodity that may be jettisoned at any time.

    Doesn't Recommend
  11.  

    Don't work there as a contractor

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Sales Arch in Boise, ID
    Former Employee - Sales Arch in Boise, ID

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard as a contractor (more than an year)

    Pros

    As a contractor, my supplier paid its employees weekly.

    Cons

    In sales, there are two categories of employees, the core group of "employees" and the ETWs ( temp workers). The core group gets treated like humans and real employees with career development and all the help they need to succeed in their position. As a temp worker you don't have any of these benefits and are expected take much more of the garbage that goes on in the center. Professionalism is lacking and the behavior of many reps is worse than school age children. It could almost be classified hostile at times. Management is running scared otherwise they would have promoted from within with many capable internal employees instead of hiring from outside. Sales Managers are also inconsistent in applying policies.There is also disregard and almost discrimination against "seasoned " workers who actually show up for work instead of slacking like the younger generation.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Get rid of the ETWs and put everyone on the same level instead of an " us and them" culture in the sales center. Clean out the marketing department and hire a team that will drive calls into the center. Be consistent in the training and listen to a few suggestions from trainees instead of the L&D ruining everything. Also, try and figure why the QA lead has some much power in other areas that doesn't concern that area.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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