Makerbot
2.5 of 5 24 reviews
www.makerbot.com Brooklyn, NY 150 to 499 Employees

Makerbot Reviews

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2.5 24 reviews

                             

44% Approve of the CEO

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Bre Pettis

(9 ratings)

30% of employees recommend this company to a friend
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7 people found this helpful  

My experience at Makerbot Industries (I call the place "The Enchanted Land of MakerBot")

Productor (Former Employee)
Brooklyn, NY

I worked at Makerbot full-time for less than a year

ProsThey provide their employees with full health and dental benefits through Aetna. Full-time hourly employees receive 10 PAID days off (although any specific day requires one-month advance notice) each calendar year as well as 5 "sick" days (I believe this is right???) They participate in NYCT's TransitChek program. They offer direct deposit. It is BROOKLYN!!! and there is, from the factory, a spectacular view of the city. There is fresh fruit available in the break area every morning. The vending machines dispense snacks and beverages for twenty-five cents apiece. They give out cupcakes at the beginning of every month to celebrate the birthdays of any employee for whom it might then be applicable. There is a monthly "bagel breakfast" held at which a newly instituted 'employee-of-the-month' (as well as other incentive-based awards) program happens. Sometimes they buy pizza or sandwiches from Costco for the employees' lunch. There was one time when they actually served ice cream. There is a company softball team (although I never played on it). Everybody gets a t-shirt (I still got mine but really and truly never wear it). I was offered stock options. And there are some people there who I will remember fondly all the rest of my days.

ConsThe "at-will" termination clause written into each hourly employees' contract. The puntiliousness, reminiscent of my experience in elementary school, in the observance of their "occurrence" (i.e. tardiness) policy. Their policy of "mandatory overtime". The operational culture there is arguably nepotistic and not meritocratic. The most salient and germane of their deficiencies is the poor management capabilities -- very poor indeed (and by which I do mean more than simply the physical separation of their corporate offices from the factory/ warehouse facilities). Allow me, however, to steer back once again toward the statement of verifiable fact (having admittedly swayed into the oncoming traffic lane of personal opinion, indeed): I began work at MakerBot Industries on February 20th, 2013 as a 'Productor'. I, along with four other gentlemen winnowed out during the previous week's interview process (please see appropriate section), arrived at the "Botcave" (as the 'original' space is still affectionately known) along with the entire production staff -- almost every single one of whom was then returning from a two-week UNPAID hiatus resulting from a supply-chain interruption. At approximately the same time (the end of February) an entire level of management was hired on to oversee operations at what was to become their new factory/ warehouse facility. (The corporate office had by then already been established downtown.) Over the course of my almost-five-months-long tenure at their factory/ warehouse (I did resign on July 10th, 2013) I performed five distinct operational tasks: subassembly, final assembly, inspection, packaging and inventory control. In my first 45 days of employment I had three-and-one-half days off total. These were predominantly 10-hour-long days and involved either "ramped-up" production (before the relocation of the production facilities on April 1st) or, toward the end of March, everything that was involved in physically moving into "The Enchanted Land" (as I call the place). Soon after reaching 90 days of employment I received a perfectly satisfactory performance review (I had used one sick-day, waking up with it in the morning and calling in that day, and two days when I was one-and-one-half hours late {though these were days when I had previously informed, and received permission to be late from, my immediate supervisor} -- he also being my performance reviewer who in response to the direct question I asked at the end of the evaluation, "What more can I do better for you all?" answered "Not a thing.") and accordingly received the maximum allowable pay-wage increase of $3.00 per/hour. Roughly the last five weeks were wholeheartedly devoted to the systematic organization of their warehouse and the execution of an annual "auditing" (counting of the entire warehouse on-hand stock) procedure. "Arguably" (my tell-tale word) from mismanagement, poor decision-making and simply the chaos involved in actually 'moving' everything one has to anywhere else, "undesirable" (again my word) numbers and confusion resulted. Although "mandatory overtime" was no longer obliged of me (or anyone else by that time), I did, on more than a handful of occasions, go home completely and utterly exhausted (indeed having stayed late) only to pass out at home and just hoping to be able to be reasonably functional on the next-day. I suffered an allergic reaction (such as requires medical attention) to a pair of work gloves I unfortunately decided to make use of one day -- but kept on working. My birthday (which I, perhaps idiosyncratically, am wont to take off and spend as I will) fell on the day right in the middle of the week long affair the "auditing" process itself turned out to be: I worked it (my hands messed up)!!! The actual results of how everything turned out, for well or for ill, I was not made privy to. I had given to them my best efforts though; yet despite enabling the duly-licensed outside 'auditors' to most easily make their assessments (items most readily countable were invariably chosen by them and reflect my exclusive preparation (mine and that of my three helpers), and the fact that my own numbers were invariably within 1% of these same professionals' (and I dare say God's) own reckoning, I nonetheless could not persuade upper management that I merited the advertised, and salaried, position of "Supply-Chain Project Manager" (the job description for which would imply, at the very least, the disallowal of any such "arguably" mismanaged affairs ever again occurring in the future). It is, however, company policy for newly-hired Productors to wait six months before applying to any other position not constituting a "lateral move" (whatever that may mean). I, personally, haven't the patience and am at an absolute loss to understand what more I might have shown them in those last five weeks which would have prompted any further consideration on their part -- Oh yeah, that's right, I did have something, didn't I? (and have, in fact, just made a wicked 'inside' joke to those very few who are indeed in the know about this -- and to all others who aren't but still have had the patience to continue reading this far, please understand that I have finally arrived at my point): If anything about what I have written here, (because every one of these statements -- exempting those duly noted -- can be substantiated) has "raised a red-flag" in your mind, I stipulate that MakerBot Industries really and truly has no place for someone like you. Unless, of course, you are willing to do the kind of work I have alluded to, as well as I did, for $13 per/hour (this is a 30% pay increase from the actual starting wage so one shouldn't expect the next to be so very
'generous'), or you are an engineer. Because if you are (either) then Come on down I dare say MakerBot will make up (if not find) a job for you (since) Engineers, I have said this before (out loud, in fact, just ask 'um), are Cool -- really and truly. But Productors - for them I just cannot see any there ever thriving until they take upon themselves the organization of a union. And there are some people there who I will not remember fondly any of the rest of my days.

Advice to Senior ManagementTo the Director of Operations at the factory/ warehouse (and those to whom such petitions must eventually be made): central heat/ AC on the factory, if not warehouse, floor. To the members of the "leadership" team: think hard to answer the question as to why Adam Mayer and Zack Smith (among any number of other presumably hard-working and talented individuals) no longer wish to be involved in what may well prove to be your history-making endeavor; and then go ahead and cash-in the winning lottery ticket you all are sitting on -- Lord knows you deserve it. Let Stratasys, Ltd. make a corporation of your company and please remember for the rest of your days what is, in fact, the god's honest truth: We are all of us in this-(business-of-life)-thing together; and so you share the work, and you share the wealth. And to Bre: you need a speechwriter (while everyone else is pondering the inquiry proposed above).

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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12 people found this helpful  

An amazing group of people being taken advantage of...

Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)

I have been working at Makerbot full-time for more than a year

Pros-You will never work with more talented, genuine, kindhearted and intelligent people than the ones you will find at MakerBot. Most of these people will be the leaders and innovators of the future.
-3D printing is an amazing field to work in, it will change the world, and it is great to be a part of that process. Our products are great and could be the best.
-Lot's of honesty and openness amongst employees. We are all on the same page.
-Some managers and a few chief officers are good and fair people, true leaders.

Cons-The pay is extremely low, imbalanced and an insult when compared to the money the company will waste in other places.
-Certain employees are treated terribly. Paid unlivable wages, forced to work more than should be expected of one person and treated poorly the entire time.
- There is a clear divide between production, corporate and retail that is getting worse and causing communication to become difficult.
-The most powerful, and I'm assuming highest paid, employees are mostly friends or relatives. This wouldn't be so bad if they seemed more capable.
- We have already started to lose the best employees, and more will follow if things don't get better.

Advice to Senior ManagementTo the good managers and leaders:
Keep fighting the good fight. Push back against unrealistic goals and deadlines. Pay close attention to your employees.
To the very top:
Please leave. You're stifling, suffocating and negative. Your paranoia and greed are showing. Make your money and get out.
To the current and future investors:
This company is a gold mine full of amazing talent and opportunity. We are waiting to flourish. Have us treated better and there is nothing we can't accomplish.

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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14 people found this helpful  

CEO & management are paranoid and incapable

Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)
Brooklyn, NY

I have been working at Makerbot full-time for less than a year

ProsVery cool product. A lot of very smart and effective employees.

ConsReally bad management. They simply do not communicate their intent. If and when employees finally hear what's going on, it's usually only to discover a fresh batch of poor decisions.

The "wow" factor of the product is the only thing keeping people here, and hence the only thing keeping the company alive. A lot of other companies are appearing in this space though. MakerBot's advantage will disappear quickly.

Advice to Senior ManagementValue the smart people you've hired.

And help the CEO to understand how bad at his job he is -- there's always a chance he can learn.

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

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15 people found this helpful  

Amazing potential...going down the drain.

Anonymous Employee (Former Employee)

I worked at Makerbot full-time

ProsThe work environment is great -- when you'd not being blindsided by incompetent, reactive calls from the top.

First off, the company basically created the market for 3d printers aimed at consumers. They were the first to offer a 3d printer priced within reach of average people; now there's a thriving market segment which does just that. Starting a whole new market (ok, segment of a market) sets some really high expectations, and is quite exciting.

Second, MakerBot's staff were (and the ones that remain still are) without exception the best team I have ever had the pleasure of working with. The average worker there is exceptional -- if not totally brilliant, then tenacious, driven, and quality-minded. This applies to both the original team and the more experienced crew who succeeded them after the first round of people were pushed out.

Getting things done there was also a pleasure -- most processes are lean, and there's not too much bureaucracy, at least compared to a large company. People were amazingly positive for the most part. At times, this was certainly the best job of my career. People liked to have fun when they weren't working hard...and often when they were.

ConsThe downsides, unfortunately, have come to outweigh the positives. Top management, especially the CEO, are in a desperate, reactive mode that threatens to destroy the company.

The worst thing is their attitude towards employees. A lot of MakerBot's previous job postings would append "-bot" to the end of the job title to be cutesy. Unfortunately, this seems to belie their understanding of employees -- it's as if they think that people should actually be treated as robots. That is: paid very little, replaced without much thought, and never listened to. It's as if they really don't understand that a company _is_ its employees -- especially a company with a team as amazing as the one at MakerBot.

MakerBot has had a very high turnover, which is absolutely unnecessary considering how great much of the experience is. Someone else here has used the term "toxic" to describe the work environment -- that is, unfortunately, the exact word for it.

Advice to Senior ManagementValue your employees and community. Rein in the Founder/CEO before he destroys everything; he's in way over his head.

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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11 people found this helpful  

Worker bee

Maker Maker (Current Employee)
Brooklyn, NY

I have been working at Makerbot full-time

Proshealth insurance for everyone, interesting company, free lunch on friday, innovative

Conslittle loyalty to employees, contracts of employment are very restrictive, lunch is usually pretty lame, never any drinks either. impulsive management, little transparency to staff, low pay

Advice to Senior Managementbe nice to your employees

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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Glassdoor is your free inside look at Makerbot reviews and ratings — including employee satisfaction and approval rating for Makerbot CEO Bre Pettis. All 5 reviews posted anonymously by Makerbot employees.