Meditech

www.meditech.com

Meditech Reviews

Updated December 19, 2014
Updated December 19, 2014
177 Reviews
3.0
177 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Meditech President & CEO Howard Messing
Howard Messing
93 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Annual bonus, working from home opportunities, good work life balance (in 29 reviews)

  • Benefits are great and so are the bonuses when they come around (in 21 reviews)


Cons
  • Low starting salary (36-37k for my position) (in 20 reviews)

  • Limited advancement opportunities (even with 100% of non-entry level hiring coming from within company) (in 14 reviews)

More Highlights

36 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1. 4 people found this helpful  

    Broke as a joke

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Meditech

    Pros

    Free soda, cheap (and good) food, outside of Boston (cheaper cost of living, but still high), good health benefits

    Cons

    Low salary, obsolete programing language, unsympathetic management. You get the feeling of being in a dead end; the company doesn't give you enough experience to branch out (especially since you're programming in a language that NO ONE else uses), so you have to move up inside the company to improve your life. But... why would you want to? A 5k better salary STILL sucks!

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Work it into your budget to pay your employees better. Employees with families stick around for the long haul, but how to you expect someone to raise a family near Boston for 40k a year?

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2.  

    It wasn't for me. I didn't really fit in. If you do fit in, you may really like it and even thrive.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Development Specialist in Westwood, MA
    Former Employee - Development Specialist in Westwood, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    Great work life balance, friendly coworkers that created a pleasant atmosphere, good health benefits, cheap cafeteria with decent food. The open office environment does encourage collaboration.

    Cons

    It's a technology company with outdated technology. The compensation is VERY low and it takes a long time before the bonus kicks in. It felt like everyone understood how things worked except for me. When i asked questions, I was laughed at or the questions were brushed off. When I refrained from asking questions, I was told that I was not taking initiative.

    The open office space makes it hard to concentrate.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Pay employees better, update your IT systems, and give some genuine flexibility in opportunities for shifting jobs into something that may be a better fit.

    With that said, the company is clearly very profitable and I can't argue with results.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3. 2 people found this helpful  

    It's like meeting&dating the man of your dreams and finding out he's married. ;)

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Marketing in Westwood, MA
    Current Employee - Marketing in Westwood, MA

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Work life balance, easy work, marriott points galore(best benefit), opportunity to travel and enjoy our great country.
    Happy place to start (until you realize how poor the pay is and how nonexistent progress will be)
    Staff r nice but that says nothing about the company, u can find nice staff working at a junkyard or a car wash but that doesn't mean you're going to work there now does it? ..as always there are plenty idiotic staff who annoy you because of their constant need to kiss bum and b seen kissing bum.

    Cons

    Where to start....as said, depends on your supervisor. I have an ok one, makes life easier but majority of the supervisors here are a bunch of complete junkboxes; Lowlife long tenured peeps who don't know a lot about a lot and just know what they know cos they've been there forever. They sit around gossiping and plotting the 'underbus pushing' of the next employee...and their superiors get involved too. Wish I could name names but that would be low.

    Probably pointless to tell u that salary is ridiculous and raises are as foolish and baseless as the gossipy supervisors.

    Resistant to change, they will rather die stupid than progress in their mentality

    Before I forget, let me just tell you, take a meditech job if u get offered before finding anything else, stay for about 2-3yrs to get experience and build resume and fly out before u get roped into this nonforward thinking/nonforward movement setting. To move up, you have to be there forever and u have to master the art of moving your lips towards superior bums ...A.k.a kiss superior arse with your hands raised so they can see u.

    The only thing that excites them is a new web based product on the way ...which they should have thought of ages ago.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Ehm, let me be unoriginal this time and steal what someone said...GTH :D

    Only one person(or 2 maximum) is great and visionary but unfortunately , SHE won't be the next CEO, I believe - reorg in progress or complete they say, we see what comes out of that.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  4. Is this helpful? The community relies on everyone sharing – Add Anonymous Review


  5.  

    Easy work, low pay, reluctant to change

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Development Programmer in Westwood, MA
    Current Employee - Development Programmer in Westwood, MA

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Work is relatively easy and, work life balance and benefits are great. Work from home available after one year, ability to buy company stock which pays a good dividend, high annual bonus

    Cons

    LOW pay for entry level employees, pay not increased when transferring to a higher paid position, no attempt to increase pay for current employees when starting salaries rise.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Raise starting salaries, allow employees to get a salary review more than once per year if they are good, bring in new blood with fresh outside experience into development management positions

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6. 2 people found this helpful  

    Too Much Leadership, Not Enough Action

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Great coworkers and open communication from specialist to specialist. You are able to create a relationship with your coworkers and sites, bringing a unique social responsibility to your work.

    Cons

    Management can be focused on numbers and not aware of a situation. Hard to receive support until the flames are licking at the "right" person's feet, even if you've been in them above your head for awhile.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7. 2 people found this helpful  

    Good job overall. Not the type of salary I am looking for, long term.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Development Programmer in Fall River, MA
    Current Employee - Development Programmer in Fall River, MA

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Solid management team. Friendly coworkers.

    Cons

    Difficult learning curve. Very poor salary for development programmer. No usable experience with contemporary languages will you receive here.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8. 6 people found this helpful  

    Good starting point, not good long term.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Work atmosphere is great. I love the people that I work with. Depending on the group, work hours can be flexible. Benefits are great and so are the bonuses when they come around.

    Cons

    Zero room for growth, starting salary is pitiful, raises are almost non-existent. Employees get promoted based on how long they stick it out here, rather than actual skill or effort.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop buying buildings that you can't fill with employees. You need to learn to show employees that they matter. Telling us that we had a bad year and raises won't be good while at the same time purchasing a $25 million dollar building is absolutely absurd. That is a giant slap in the face to your employees. You need to get in touch with reality and realize that we do the brunt of the work.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
  9. 4 people found this helpful  

    A Nice Place to Visit but You Don't Want to Live There

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    - They're open to all majors. I was a linguistics major. The manager who interviewed me had been a geography major. One of the best programmers in my group was a Philosophy major. If you're a college student looking for a first job in technology, whatever your major may be is fine with Meditech where other companies might not give you a thought.

    - For programmer positions the interview includes a test that teaches you some of the language but largely looks at your logic/analytical skills. Personally I think that's really the best method.

    - Like everyone else says, they have good benefits. 90%of health/dental paid. For an entire family plan with spouse + children I was paying about $250/mo. Sweet deal.

    - They take really good care of their grounds/buildings. I think it's vastly underappreciated. It's nice to take a stroll and enjoy walkways around Lowderbrook. Have lunch in the beautiful atrium in Canton. In the winter, walkways and parking lots kept impeccably well plowed/shoveled/sanded. If there were any problems with my cube/area, put in a ticket and quickly taken care of. The operations staff are phenomenal.

    - The annual bonus gets quite nice after a few years. It's a percentage of past 5 years pay so it keeps getting better each year.

    - The company picnic is awesome. Only thing I really miss. It's mostly done by volunteers. I would highly recommend you volunteer. It's a lot of fun for the kids and you get free Meditech swag in thanks. :)

    - As others have said, generally good work/life balance. They tend to be very family friendly in general.

    - For Other Mommies: Really nice mothers rooms. door lock, very nice cushy chair, lots of magazines, has its own mini fridge for milk so you're not stuck putting milk in the communal kitchen fridge.

    Cons

    - Like everyone else has said, salary way below industry and it never catches up. Raises are in $1200 increments determined at annual review. So after your review you might get a raise of $0/$1200/$2400/$3600 or rarely $4800. I honestly think MT expects everyone to buy stock. The long-termers who were doing well that I talked to, that's how they did it. It often outpaced their salary. Or they hit cap on the profit sharing plan.

    - The annual bonus does not make up for the low salary. Some people try to claim that. Leaving Meditech got me an immediate 33% raise even when I included the bonus into my MT pay.

    - Raises should be better tied to performance. Most people expect their raise to be based on their performance and group budget/company success. That's it. At Meditech the other salaries in your group are also taken into account. This was more of a problem for the long-termers like 10+ years when the rest of the group was newer. They said it didn't matter how hard they worked or well they did, they'd still get a $0 or at most $1200 because they already outpaced the group. There's a surefire way to kill senior employee motivation.

    - Getting a promotion doesn't necessarily get you a raise either. It merely raises your theoretical pay cap (they don't have hard caps last I checked). It can be raised but doesn't have to be. So oftentimes being promoted means taking on more responsibility now but not seeing any benefit until your next review comes around.

    - On that note, advancement potential for those of a technical mind but not interested in management is limited. You've got Programmer > Senior Programmer > Computer Scientist. That's it. Computer Scientist appointments are few and kind of a big deal so you see quite a few folk languishing at Senior Programmer. If management is your kind of thing, there's more options available to you. But for geeks who want to grow in skill rather than clout it's very narrow.

    - Because the company only hires entry level and promotes from within, leadership promotion seems more like Survivor or attrition warfare than who would make a good supervisor or manager. In areas of high turnover, the one who lasts the longest is usually the one tapped. Highly motivated people who want to be managers/leaders usually leave before they get to that point.

    - Pay/promotion aside, let's talk about other motivating factors. Appreciation/praise? Largely depends on your supervisor. Sometimes customers will appreciate what you do but not often. Freedom/Autonomy? Again, largely depends on your supervisor. Mine was fantastic but some micromanage hard. Learning opportunities/skill growth? The main reason why the reviews here recommend this only as a starter job. You will learn a great deal in your first years here but after a certain point it will stop. That's the point I would recommend trying to transfer to learn new/different skills. In the same position, once you've learned what you need to do the job proficiently there's almost no encouragement to go beyond.

    - As implied by the last point, your supervisor can make your Meditech experience awesome or awful. Given the tenure/outlast modality, I unfortunately saw a lot of the latter. This was a killer for group morale, hampered or outright discouraged employees' development, would cause more turnover and oftentimes it was difficult to transfer out from under such supervisors. Which brings me to my last point...

    - They must be in a state of denial over their internal mobility if they think it's great. Their transfer policies are already longer than my huge entry here but there's no oversight of those policies either. I've seen what look like vengeful sups block transfers of those under them. Those people wound up leaving. None of my cases were that bad but it did take me 2 years to get my first transfer. Trying for a 2nd transfer 7 years in, it was assigned almost a year out (well past a policy that says should be in 90 days) which is when I finally threw in the towel.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1) Be willing to hire into sup/manager roles. That way you can get people who are good at management into those positions rather than whoever hasn't quit yet. I know you're concerned you want supervisors/managers to understand what the people under them do, but that's what training is for. It's easier to teach technical skills than it is to teach leadership skills. Have you ever noticed your training for new supervisors focuses on trying to teach leadership? That should tell you something about your promotion practices.

    2) Shift your focus to how you can gain and maintain loyalty rather than assuming it as a given. There's an insidious mindset of "Anyone who wouldn't have us is someone we wouldn't want anyway." Almost like shielding your ego at a company level rather than asking what happened. This mindset creeps it's way into your actions like not having real exit interviews, not rehiring staff who have left, having a difficult transfer process that can easily be shut down by a few people, not having real career/skill development for employees ("Working the Generation Gap" don't count). These kinds of actions come across as hubris and taking your staff for granted. I'm not the only one to get that vibe. I think someone else on Glassdoor put it as "Meditech acts like they're the last coke in the desert." Yes you're a successful company but how much better would you be if you retained your top talent and improved knowledge and motivation across the board? Put your employees first and they will in turn put you first.

    3) Realize that the compensation model that has worked for the long-termers will not work for the new blood. The long-termers have a good deal of stock and make most their money on that or having capped their profit share so the salary is less important. They happened to get in while you were a young company with a great deal of growth. You are a mature company now and will not grow like that again. So for newer/younger employees the stock will not compensate for the depressed salary. Newer employees the compensation model will need to focus on salary and bonus.

    4) I can appreciate the difficulty in trying to balance the satisfaction of long-termers vs newer employees. The long-termers feeling like they will not see a reward no matter how hard they work. The newer employees feeling like the working poor on salaries that make it difficult to pay ever-larger student loans and survive. Have you ever considered starting a loan assistance program? Student loans are the biggest financial woe I hear (and tuition reimbursement doesn't help there). Some employers are already using LRAPs to get and retain employees. For the long-termers, I realize raises aren't always possible (how much is a senior programmer really worth?) Have you ever considered service awards to recognize and reward their loyalty and longevity? The company I work for now does that and while they may be things like nice watches or jewelry instead of money, the employees seem to really enjoy them and keep them with pride.

    5) Development Specific: Quality guys, quality! Stop rushing to get things out the door. If it needs more testing, so be it. That's how you keep getting so many bugs. And stop obsessing over getting the bug counts down; you're only forcing people to go for low hanging fruit. They can bang out 5 easy DTSs in a day to get your bug counts down. Or they can spend all day working on that one massive issue. Guess which one your customers want? Dimes to donuts, the massive issue. Focus on bug impact over raw bug numbers, and focus on testing and quality over deadlines. And while I'm wishful thinking, have your dev groups by NPR/M-AT instead of 5.x and 6.x. There is no reason to have separate 5.x/6.x groups for things like ABS, GENFINS, EMPFINS, or LAB. You've only split your resources and made more confusion when those areas of 5.x and 6.x run into the same issues all being NPR-based.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 2 people found this helpful  

    Good for the experience, good for no more than a few years

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    - The benefits are good. If you're older, I hear the healthcare benefits are top-notch. If you're a young guy like me, this won't really help you.
    - There is a good work/life balance. Although you have set hours, bosses are easy going about leaving early or coming in late on days you need to.
    - If you are not the breadwinner in your family, this is a good place to work and bring in a little extra money for the family.
    - My group was very laid back but we got work done too. I would consider it a "fun" place to work if you have the right group.
    - Consistent raises every year.
    - Good experience to get a job elsewhere. I took a 20k increase in pay at my next job with the MEDITECH experience I took away.

    Cons

    - Low starting salary (36-37k for my position). The raises are consistent, but 3 years in, you're still at an entry level salary in the low 40s.
    - High turnover, lots of people are in and out within 2.5 years.
    - Not a lot of career growth. There is no human resources, and so you will need to work your boss's boss if you want to move up to what amounts to a cosmetic improvement. There is not a lot of growth up the ladder as well. For the most part, supervisors have been there at a minimum 5 or 6 years. For the most part, managers are about 10-15 years. This requires you to put a lot of time into the company at the expense of learning new skills and making more money.
    - Supervisors and Managers do not get a pay increase for the job, just an increase in their pay cap.
    - It is the company culture to put in a lot of time and be all-for the company. A lot of people seem complacent with their job because the company fosters those who 'stick it out'. They are just collecting the paycheck and the bonus that they rant about. They don't seem to realize that tons of other companies out there offer an equal or better bonus.
    - I found the company to be a bit unforgiving. When I left the company after three and a half years, I was walked out the day I put in my two weeks notice, without a thank you for your time and hard work. I guess they had a bad breakup in the past at some point and never quite got over it.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Foster growth for those who have your entry-level positions. The morale was awful in my group.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  11. 3 people found this helpful  

    Best place to work for 2013 is not. If you need a job, this is the place. A job is better than no job.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Development Specialist in Framingham, MA
    Current Employee - Development Specialist in Framingham, MA

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Flexible schedule (Development only), food in cafeteria is cheap, free soda, good office environment, free coffee, can use a small gym if you have the time, excellent health care coverage, $4,000 tuition reimbursement per year, a year end bonus but the tax rate is 35%, a $3,500 bonus is available if you recommend someone to work at Meditech which also gets taxed at a high rate so after taxes you get $1,225. You also get 13 paid holidays, the first 2 years of employment you accrue 6.67 hours per month for vacation and on your third year you start accruing 10 hours per month. Finally after 3 years of employment, you can petition to work from home 1 day a week.

    Cons

    Low salary, no 401K, poor management (Meditech thinks that because you are a good programer or a good specialist then you must be a good manager/supervisor), there is a profit sharing plan which employees can buy into it but since this is not a public traded company, Meditech decides at what price you can buy/ sell your shares and you can only sell them back to Meditech. Meditech likes to hire people right out of college to mostly work for service, implementation or marketing. These positions pay the least and requires long hours of work and in some cases you have to work or travel to a site on weekends or holidays without any extra compensation. People in service and implementation usually last between 1 to 3 years and most marketing personnel usually 4 to 5 years. If you are a new employee regardless of the position, you will be required to travel between buildings for training sessions for about 15 months and there is no compensation for the hundreds of miles traveled.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Management does a lot of micromanagement and employes feel as they are always being watched. Employees would work a lot harder if there was trust. Hire experts not just people right out of college so the company can create innovative products. Increase salaries in every department so employees think twice before leaving. Add the annual bonus to the employees' salary so the tax rate is lower than 35%. A real benefit would be to incorporate that bonus into my salary. Finally reduce the bonus that directors get so it can be more equitable. Bonuses for 2013: Pappalardo $600,000, Polimeno $300,000, Messing $800,000, Manzolillo $400,000, and Lefthes $400,000.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

Meditech Photos

Meditech Waiting area/ lobby
Got to love the windows.

+ Add Photo

Work at Meditech? Share Your Experiences

Meditech

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.