Red Frog Events

  www.redfrogevents.com
  www.redfrogevents.com

Red Frog Events Reviews

121 Reviews
3.4
121 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Red Frog Events Architect of Adventure Joe Reynolds
Joe Reynolds
59 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Free things, like clothes when you go on an event, food and snacks in the office, lunch on Mondays, shoes, etc (in 13 reviews)

  • Travel opportunities, work experience in different fields, excellent networking (in 16 reviews)


Cons
  • Very small percentage of getting a full time gig here (in 51 reviews)

  • The work is very time consuming and LONG LONG hours when you are on a Warrior Dash (in 18 reviews)

More Highlights

16 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    not fun

    Current Employee - Event Coordinator
    Current Employee - Event Coordinator

    I have been working at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Some of the people are fun working with.

    Cons

    no leadership within the company

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    step up your game.

  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    Very little structure and learning

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    I definitely had some fun times, from the office itself and having fun with the other tadpoles to the various events that I traveled to to the parties and field trip. It was a fun summer.

    Cons

    BUT, I didn't take an internship at a company in order to participate in a slightly grown up version of summer camp. That is what the internship felt like.
    The tadpoles are the real work force in this company, but the company itself takes very little time training them, teaching them, mentoring them, and making sure their jobs are being done. A large majority of the frogs don't do their job well, don't really know how to be a professional, so they *can't* really mentor or teach the tadpoles anything.
    It is a pretty sad state of affairs. Definitely a fun time, but absolutely terrible in terms of learning, professional development and taking anything concrete away from this internship. It was a waste of a summer.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    There needs to be some kind of professional development classes or seminars for the frogs to attend. Most of them are swimming in the deep end, having very little experience or knowledge about their specific jobs. You are throwing money out of the window by putting these unprofessional, unskilled, and unknowledgeable people in charge of large aspects of your company. It's little wonder why many of your new events are complete failures.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3. 4 people found this helpful  

    Work Hard, Learn Little, Leave Unhappy

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Travel around the country
    Live in Chicago
    Free beer in the office

    Cons

    The title of this review says it all. You will work very hard, especially when you're on site at an event. You learn very little as what you do as an intern equates to low level peon work while in the office and manual labor when on site at an event. The full time employees make little (if any) effort to actually teach you about event planning. That could be because so many of them have less than one year experience and so they are still learning the ropes themselves.

    At the end of the internship you are told some story about why they can't offer you a full time position. What this really means is that the full time employees liked some of the other interns better. This is not based on skill or passion, but on popularity. Because such is the case you leave with a really bad taste in your mouth.

    This is not a company that seems concerned with hiring the top talent as they move toward the future. They seem to be only focused on the immediate future, which is not a great business plan.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Get to know what is going on in your company, especially when it comes to the hiring process. Your employees are only focused on hiring the popular interns, not the interns with the skills and talents that will cause your company to succeed in the future.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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  5. 6 people found this helpful  

    Too Much to Say

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I have been working at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Cool office, fun people to work with

    Cons

    The interns run the place. Full time staff relies on them to do most of the work, at event set ups and in the office. Full time staff doesn't help train at all or answer any questions. It's a very gossipy office and their customer service is terrible. They rip off people all the time and are very hush hush about the money flow within the company. It's going to go under in 5-10 years, because the CEO and CFO have no idea what's happening beneath them. They give you money to buy clothes for warrior dash set ups, but they have to be RFE gear only...it's uncomfortable and they're giving it to us for promotion.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Pay attention to your current full time staff. They hire people based off popularity, not skill or talent. I know people that put in 10 times as much work as others and they didn't get the job while the lazy, funny one did.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Red Frog Events Response

    May 30, 2013.

    Thank you for letting us know how was your time was at Red Frog Events. We appreciate your feedback and are continuing to work diligently to ensure everyone has a positive experience during their ... More

  6. 4 people found this helpful  

    Meh...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Got to go to some really cool places
    People were generally nice
    Line on a resume, pretty much all it's good for

    Cons

    Didn't really make any long term friends
    I mean just read the other comments, they say it all. Wasn't really worth it.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Red Frog Events Response

    Apr 11, 2013Red Frogger

    Thank you for your post. We're grateful that Glassdoor is finally allowing employers the opportunity to respond to reviews this spring. Please know that we take each and every review as constructive ... More

  7. 6 people found this helpful  

    Do whatever you can to find a different job, unless you're main priority is foosball and drinking in the office.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Snacks all the time, flexible hours when you're not traveling, beer in the office

    Cons

    Interns are loud, all of the time, when you travel you can work up to 100 hours that week (on $500..... so, way below minimum wage), your supervisors don't care if you eat or sleep while you're traveling - 3 to 4 hours a night is acceptable to them, not a serious workplace whatsoever.

    I have found myself strongly encouraging friends not to apply. I hated this job and would have quit after a month if I needed need the income for the rest of the summer. It was not a good experience.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You are driving away a lot of talented people with a great work-fun balance because the interns are allowed to do whatever they want. The chaos gets old when you are trying to build a career and learn new skills. At the end of the day, I feel scammed into believing this was going to be an amazing experience.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8. 7 people found this helpful  

    An Internship, A Poor Experience, and Moving Forward: My Life At RFE

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    There are a lot of perks to the job, which is how they lure so many interns into the position every semester. The office is made to attract people to the position as it has a slide, tree houses, a bar, TVs, and a generally fun atmosphere.

    Outside of unlimited vacation days, the free food and drinks, lunch on Mondays, and a clothing stipend when you go on events, all of the other benefits are reserved for full time employees, so don't let that factor into your decision of taking the internship.

    The best part of the internship, hands down, is meeting, working with, and becoming friends with the other interns.

    Cons

    Preparing for the internship I did a lot of research on the company. I studied and learned as much as I could. Going into the internship I worked as hard as I possibly could: coming in early, staying late, going above and beyond, helping out wherever I could around the office, and generally putting my best foot forward at every turn.

    The feedback I received from my mentor (which was, in turn, feedback they received from my team leaders and from RDs on site at events) seemed to confirm my own thoughts: I was working hard, doing good work, getting a long with everybody, and generally putting my best foot forward at every turn. All signs, both implicit and explicit, pointed towards getting the job at the other side of the internship.

    The problem was that I sincerely discounted three main things in my assessment of how the internship was going:

    1) The fact that RFE does not hire based on how hard you work or how well you do your work. They hire based on who is the most popular among their full time employees.

    2) The fact that all your feedback is not meant to be an honest representation of how well you are doing, but a way to keep you motivated to keep working hard, all the while thinking that your hard work will bloom into a full time offer.

    3) The immaturity and selfishness of the full time employees. A mature and selfless employee who is secure with their skills in the workplace and concerned with the future of the company for which they work would push to hire the best and the brightest of each internship class. Not at RFE. The employees push for interns who will not encroach on their position in the company. The result is that RFE keeps hiring weaker and weaker staff.

    So, inevitably, I did not get the offer to come on full time. My mentor read some excuse from an email they received and had no real, viable reason about why I did not get hired. The real reason was that I worked hard instead of worrying about my popularity among the full time staff, foolishly thinking that RFE rewarded good, hard work and talent above popularity among their employees. The real rub was that I honestly believed that I was good friends with the full time staff as I had nothing but positive experiences with them and never ruffled any feathers. But, just like the feedback from my mentor, team leaders, and RDs, that was also completely fake.

    So as I move forward, I look back at my time at RFE with mixed feelings. Most of them are negative as I feel the company has some serious issues that need to be dealt with immediately. The bright spots are the friendships with the other interns that I know I will have for the rest of my life.

    Did I learn during my internship? Not a lot.

    Would I ever do it again? Never. Had I known then what I know now I would have never done it to begin with.

    Am I going to spend my time being bitter towards RFE? A bit of time, perhaps. But I know that it is better to have RFE in the rear view mirror than it is to be in worthless, thankless internship on Ohio St.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Where to begin.

    The philosophy you had when you had 10 employees and quirky workspace absolutely does not work with a company of your size. Your homecoming court-esque internship program which only rewards popularity and not hard work is absolute nonsense. You are never going to have continued success with that kind of short thinking.

    Internally there needs to be an outlet for interns and employees to give honest feedback. Because your program is built upon popularity, no one ever feels free to give honest feedback. Some have suggested firing 50% of your full time employees. I think that's generous. I'd put the number closer to 75%.

    Start trimming the fat and hiring the talent. Your company will blow away the competition. At this point the competition is in the lead.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  9. 6 people found this helpful  

    Not as cool as it's made out to be

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Free things, like clothes when you go on an event, food and snacks in the office, lunch on Mondays, shoes, etc.
    Unlimited vacation days
    Travel to some cool locations
    Really fun events
    Cool office with foosball, slide, treehouse, fish (although they die more often than not), bar, etc.

    Cons

    From the outside looking in, the internship looks amazing. The company does a great job of using their office and events as recruiting tools. Along with the benefits (although a HUGE majority of the benefits they promote are for full time employees only), the internship looks like a no brainer: it's going to be amazing.

    However, things are not always what they seem.

    I actually didn't mind the "busy" work kind of stuff, like cold calling companies, doing random things for the office manager, and generally helping out where ever I was able. You are literally learning what goes into running these events from the ground level and I'm sure it would have came in handy if I had been brought on full time.

    What I did mind about the internship was that the company culture is fake. All of the full timers, including your mentor, act like they are your best friends or that you are part of the RFE family. The only reason they are happy is because you being there as an intern keeps their company above water. It also keeps you working really hard because you think that you are getting nothing but good feedback (from your mentor) and nothing but good vibes from other full timers. It's fake. The minute you get the phone call that you didn't get the job you are gone and forgotten.

    There are a myriad of other things that I did not like in the least about RFE, but the fake culture that they promote was really the thing that got to me, probably because the type of culture they _say_ they have was the thing that I appreciated the most about the company. But then I realized it was all a lie and that was the most disappointing.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Hire talented people, not the most popular with your full timers.

    Have you internship program be just that: an INTERNSHIP. Definitely offer the most talented people a full time job, but it's time to start a different road to a full time position. There's no way in hell that talented and passionate people are going to continue to either quit their job or take a "no promises" internship after graduation, especially when you hiring rate is below 10%.

    Be more hands on. You have no idea what really does on in the company you built. If you did then you'd fire at least 50% of your full timers.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  10. 8 people found this helpful  

    The Beauty is Only Skin Deep

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as a contractor (less than an year)

    Pros

    - Chicago. It is an awesome City. Their office is right in the thick of it, I can't tell you how awesome it was to live and work in the greatest City in the United States.

     - Awesome office. You couldn't imagine a better office to have to go to work to every day.

     - Free swag. Lots of free clothes that you can use (and abuse) while on site at an event.

     - Family Lunch. Who doesn't like free food? Typically tasty and local.

     - Eclectic. Quite possibly the only place where you will have such a diverse crowd of co-workers from such unique backgrounds.

     - Young. While this is also a disadvantage to some things in the office, it is also one of the cool things. Working with people all in your age group is awesome.

     - Entertaining. Quarterly field trip. 5th floor bar. Fellow tadpoles are hilarious. Impromptu dance parties. Movie watching in the mess hall. Themed dress up days.

     - Travel. Races are usually in really picturesque places (sometimes they're just in the middle of no where) which is a great contrast to living and working in Chicago. You get to spend a lot of time with the rest of the crew on site, and learn quite a bit about each other.

     - Unlimited Days Off (Which you may or may not feel guilty using).

    All of these things are a common denominator with a lot of the recent reviews of the "Event Coordinator" experience. However, some people are a little more dramatic than others. The Event Coordinator experience is literally what you make of it. If you ask for more, look to get involved, and keep your eyes and ears open, you will have a opportunities to get involved in things more than just customer service, flushing dead fish and cold calling mom and pop businesses to beat them up over their price quotes.

    With that being said, would I do it again? Absolutely not.

    Cons

    - Extremely awkward office environment. Between the forced interactions with Full-Time employees to try to "be noticed" or the competitive nature of the Event Coordinatorship where you are never sure of other intern's motives, the general feel in the office is awkward at best. Inevitably, it gets a little cliquey from time to time, and just downright weird towards the end when everyone will do whatever it takes to get a job.

     - Too good to be true. A lot of the office perks are more for marketing and luring in recent college graduates than they are realistic to producing a productive work environment. Full-time employees seemed annoyed by people using the office amenities, and they actually do annoy the other neighbors in the office building.

     - No career opportunities. The "Event Coordinator" Program is the only way to be hired, and the advertised "20% - 30%" hiring rate is actually closer to 5%, at best. The hiring process is mostly smoke and mirrors with very little explanation, and the few that are tapped for full-time positions rarely make much sense in the big picture of the level of talent in the entire Event Coordinator Class.

     - No outlet. With the competitive nature of the Event Coordinator Program, and the awkward office environment of feeling the need to be everyone's best friend forever to be hired, you never want to speak your mind (especially when things aren't right). You typically grin and bear it, and hope you are throwing a few coins in the karma jar to get a coveted full-time position.

     - An expensive experience. Unless you already live in the Chicago area, this can be a very expensive experience. $500/week is not exactly a lot of money to live on while in Chicago, so unless your monthly income is supplemented by the Bank of Mom & Dad, I wouldn't suggest packing up and moving to try to "make it in the big City." That paycheck is good for a shoebox with a roommate in Lakeview, or living with your parents and commuting 45 minutes by train from the Suburbs.

    - Unprofessional. The perks that made the company a "quirky little startup" doing mud runs are not translating into good ideas for a larger company. Some of the full-time employees are literally out of their element in the responsibilities they are assigned to, and are extremely inefficient with their time management, communication and supervisory skills.

    - Mentors. The Mentor program was translucent as best, with extremely generic and vague feedback (if any). My personal mentor never seemed remotely interested in anything I was working on, or what I was doing. In the grand scheme of the Experience, it just added to the "Keep smiling and carry on" that a lot of Event Coordinators do, because they don't have a real outlet to talk to anyone.

    All-in-all, I couldn't help but feel like I had been conned at the end of my experience with Red Frog Events. It is sad that all of the perks that sell you on the company to pack up and head to Chicago, are just about all that you have left to talk about after everything is all said and done. Taking a step back and looking at everything, there are blatant signs that you ignore, because you want this Company that sounds too good to be true, to be just that.

    I entered the Event Coordinator Experience similar to a lot of people, with the hopes to get hired on full-time. My plan was to keep out of inevitable childish drama, look for as much responsibility as possible, prove my work ethic on site and in the office, and make some new friends along the way. This seemed like a logical plan to attempt to shine among the top Event Coordinators.

    The best part is that I did all of those things, and at the end felt that it had been an extremely successful experience. However, a phone call with a simple "We can't offer you a full-time position" without any reasoning is what made it all seem in vain. It makes the whole "Family" that Red Frog Events advertises as beautiful facade, which lures in new bobble-headed young professionals every quarter.

    My favorite part about reading a lot of these reviews, is all of the comments about gossip, brown nosing and partying with Full-Timers. I spent all of my time working that I actually never knew that Full-Timers even spent much time gossiping with or about the Event Coordinators. Which sums it all up in my last point.

     - Politics. Evidently there is no other way to get hired, other than politics. That is highly unfortunate, because the amount of talent that RFE burns out and sends through the revolving door of Event Coordinators is astounding. There is very little explanation as to how they do the choosing, or when it happens. When the decisions do happen, there is no explanation, and you are left with a drawer full of Warrior Dash clothes and absolutely no reason to ever wear it again.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - Shake the Etch-A-Sketch. Full-timers have gotten comfortable with their immunity, with very little repercussions for their actions. Actually start to trim the fat, and I guarantee that the others on the verge will either fall in line or start packing. Continuing on down this road is not a healthy way to allow the company to grow.

     - Drop the facade. The Event Coordinator Experience isn't all sunshine and roses, we get it. I have no problem doing manual labor, and I understand the right of passage that everyone in the company has had to go through. But stop telling applicants that 20% - 30% of the Event Coordinator Class gets hired. I doubt this has ever happened, unless you are averaging out the 100% who you hired when you only had three Event Coordinators four years ago. RFE and its reach with its events isn't a small drop in a bucket anymore, talented people from across the United States are leaving full-time jobs with benefits for the chance to become Full-TImers, only to get chewed up and spit out four months later with no job opportunity, and a drawer full of warrior dash t-shirts that smell like stale beer and turkey legs.

     - Take a step back. Scale models only work to a certain extent. The things that worked for Red Frog Events when it only had 30 employees don't work any more with 200. Everyone knows the current hiring process is broken. The current planning system for a lot of your events isn't great either. You are literally trying to fit 10 pounds of stuff into a 5 pound bag. There is very little training or exposure to "life after being a tadpole" and you toss new hires into the deep end to sink or swim. They have zero supervisory experience and zero professional experience and they are in charge of your events that host 20,000 plus participants who are paying a premium for an experience that very rarely exceeds expectations anymore. The product is suffering, your customers are noticing. You aren't the only one in the game anymore.

     - Customer Service. The hot mess that you call a phone system is terrible for serving Customers' Needs. The sad part is, you can pay an "Event Coordinator Contractor" pennies for what you would pay someone minimum wage to answer phones and handle issues efficiently. I don't doubt a lot of people who rightly deserve a refund simply give up because they are tired of calling during business hours and never getting an answer, or calling repeatedly to get transferred and hung up on.

     - Face time. If you insist on being the final say in anyone who gets a job, spend some time to get to know everyone. How can you make an educated decision on someone you have never met in your life? To caveat off of that, being visible and more involved can also keep some of the unethical things happening in your office (and against company policies) to stop.

     - Be (real) mentors. So you are a young company, comprised of (very) young professionals, and you are hiring more young recent graduates. Restructure your Mentor Program to actually make it productive. Match up Event Coordinators with Full-Timers with similar backgrounds and career aspirations I.e. put real effort into making it a good experience.

    While a lot of the feedback that has been posted on here has been more venting and frustration, you can't help but notice there is a common denominator with a lot of the feedback.

    Will Red Frog Events continue to move forward clearing millions of dollars in the entertainment industry? Absolutely.

    Will these reviews hopefully get through to prospective future employees so that they understand they truth behind the awe-inspiring picture that Red Frog Events paints? Hopefully.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11. 3 people found this helpful  

    Don't get invested, don't think you'll get the job, focus on your future and your next step.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Event Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Red Frog Events as a contractor (less than an year)

    Pros

    - this position is what you make of it. if you request more work and ask to contribute to big projects it can be a great addition to your resume. if you don't, you'll end up a customer service slave doing busy work for the full time staff. there is a great chance here to build on your resume but you have to be proactive and fight for it.

    - your fellow tadpoles will be some of the greatest people you'll ever meet. it's a great social and professional network to draw from in the future, and they make the travel and back breaking labor on site less painful.

    - some of the frogs are fantastic and will take you under their wing. they'll help you with your post-Red Frog job search and be a great ear during the chaos.

    - the office is as fabulous as everyone says and perks like free drinks, the bar, free dinners, etc. don't hurt either. a great day in the office is barely like work at all because you're surrounded by passionate people who work with a smile.

    - this is a great way to introduce yourself to the Chicago startup community without having to be a daily deal lackey

    - I would ONLY recommend this job to someone who doesn't want to stay in the active entertainment or music festival industry (due to the non-compete), who doesn't expect or really even want to be hired, and who wants to have a unique three to five months experience that is really what you make of it.

    Cons

    - do NOT expect to get hired and do NOT take it personally when you're not hired. they do not keep the real talent for the most part. I don't know how the vetting process works behind the scenes, but the best and brightest are often let go. They mostly want people who won't rock the boat and who don't mind traveling 25 days out of a month for the next three years. Class after class, people are shocked at who is hired. It's like management has no clue who is doing the real work within their company.

    - the actual hiring rate per intern class is 5-10%, NOT the 20% publicized. don't let all the dogma about "growth" fool you, they're only hiring more cheap interns, not more permanent staff.

    - the team leads are largely inexperienced in their fields, so you'll be "learning" things like PR from someone who has literally no idea how to write a press release.

    - working a Warrior Dash on site is extremely labor intensive. you often go long hours without meals and water can be scarce. sleep is not made a priority. you will get back to the office for a few days before you start the process all over again.

     - it was not uncommon for the full time staff to take credit for the work of interns.

    - as has been said in previous reviews, gossip about the interns amongst the full time staff is rampant and in general there is an unprofessional, high school-ish environment of partying and popularity. no amount of hard work will put you in line for a job before a new BFF of the queen bee frogs

    - feedback is pointless. you will hear "you're great! keep it up!" mixed with some minor, nit picky negatives, and then when you don't get the job they'll pick one small criticism from your second week of work to cite as a reason.

    - you will spend 2-4 hours a day on customer service, enforcing Red Frog's often poor/unclear policies to angry customers.

    - point blank - you are there as cheap labor to keep the company afloat. if they hired a manageable permanent staff and paid them real salaries with even mediocre benefit packages, they'd be belly up. you're not really there to compete for a full time job, you're there because it's the only way they keep the lights on.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    This is a common theme in all the reviews here - improve your hiring process. You are letting the strongest talent walk out your door, and a company cannot thrive while constantly churning and burning through young interns. Notice the reviews of the events saying they lack consistency and have gone downhill in the last year - this is because your working environment is extremely unstable.

    Stop having permanent staff rotate their positions. Not everyone is good at everything, and you need your best employees locked in to what they do best.

    Start thinking of what you're going to do in two to three years when your staff wants to start a family or simply have a more stable life.

    Doesn't Recommend

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