Reynolds American

www.reynoldsamerican.com

Reynolds American Reviews

Updated January 16, 2015
Updated January 16, 2015
245 Reviews
3.3
245 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Reynolds American Chairman, President, & CEO Daniel M. Delen
Daniel M. Delen
46 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Great benefits, Good starting pay, and for the most part great team members (in 34 reviews)

  • Great pay and benefits, but don't think it's long term (in 14 reviews)


Cons
  • There is almost zero work/ life balance (in 14 reviews)

  • Watch your back, senior management in information management have a problem with communicating the truth (in 14 reviews)

More Highlights

67 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Good Company to start out with however the company offers no advancement

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Territory Manager III
    Current Employee - Territory Manager III

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Flexibility, Company Car, and Okay salary once you reach TM III. Great opportunities to meet people throughout the company at national meetings. The company spares know expense at national meetings.

    Cons

    The biggest Con is the incompetent DM's they have managing you. In order to grow as an individual you need managers that will coach you to be your best. Instead these DM's are too busy covering their butts that they micro-manage and lose focus of the company culture. This company has limited advancement opportunities and its difficult to live a comfortable lifestyle with the compensation provide depending on your assignment.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Start coaching employees to advance within their desired area and stop micro managing. This is tobacco not rocket science!

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    never know what youre gonna get

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Territory Manager III in Clovis, CA
    Current Employee - Territory Manager III in Clovis, CA

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    something different every day, good pay

    Cons

    work with some crazy retailers and in some dangerous areas

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    let employees pick what region they want to work in

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3.  

    Sales rep

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Sales Representative
    Former Employee - Sales Representative

    I worked at Reynolds American full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Well known name & many in demand products. Good salary and benefits. Company car.

    Cons

    Management more concerned with market share and distribution than with customers and ethics. Reps are required to act like they own the retail stores they deal with. It's RJR's way or no way.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Without your customers you have nothing.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5.  

    Sales Representative

    Former Employee - Sales Representative in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Sales Representative in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Reynolds American full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Number two company in the industry.

    Cons

    If you don't want to relocate, don't expect to get promoted.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    N/A

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  6.  

    Pretty Good, but....

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Territory Manager II
    Former Employee - Territory Manager II

    I worked at Reynolds American full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Awesome perks, benefits and job freedom

    Cons

    Have to live in the middle of no where and constantly have a carrot dangled in front of your face about being promoted.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be honest, "transparent" and up front about promotion opportunities.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    A good resume builder

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time

    Pros

    Entry level position, many training opportunities. Company car, benefits, work out of home office. Company computer, pay for cell phone and hi speed internet. Work out in the field not in a office. Work independently most of the time.

    Cons

    Promotion limited based on who likes you and your mobility not your work. Long hours very demanding. Mostly work in retail outlets. Not allowed to think outside the box. Selling tobacco products.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Take a look at upper management leadership.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Just resigned

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Territory Manager in Sacramento, CA
    Current Employee - Territory Manager in Sacramento, CA

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    - Company vehicle, fuel paid for (Employee required to pay $125.00 a month however)
    - Positive/supportive peers (You essentially learn from them)
    - Above-average pay for an entry-level position

    Cons

    - Managers in positions incongruent with ability/interpersonal skills
    - Indifferent and/or devisive store owners often incapable of true partnership.
    - Work day is not 8-5; those are the "in the trade" hours. plan on an extra 1-2 hours a day to stay organized and informed.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - Fully vett potential DM's; ensure they can actually lead and mentor subordinates
    - Educate DM's on why it's crucial to solicit ideas / experiences from TM's.
    - Revamp the initial training program; very little purchase for the time invested
    - Incorporate objective, structured, standardized reviews after individual trainings and work-with's

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9.  

    Manager Makes the Job

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Territory Manager in Atlanta, GA
    Current Employee - Territory Manager in Atlanta, GA

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Excellent learning opportunities, great pay and benefits, company car and free gas, flexibility

    Cons

    Management should be evaluted closely. The job is wonderful if you don't have a manager that has been at the company their entire life! The manager makes the job, and if you get someone that is invested in seeing you succeed, then you have found gold. If you get an anal manager that chooses to micromanage you, then beware. You may be looking for another job.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Let employees have the freedom to make decisions without you making them. Lighten up and trust that we know how to do our own job!

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  10.  

    RJR Company Review for Prospects

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Account Manager in San Antonio, TX
    Current Employee - Account Manager in San Antonio, TX

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Great benefits, company car, work from home

    Cons

    incosistency with senior management team

    Doesn't Recommend
  11. 9 people found this helpful  

    Great launch pad, probably not a life career

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Territory Manager in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Territory Manager in Dallas, TX

    I have been working at Reynolds American full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    There are few companies that offer what RJRT offers today, especially for recent college grads. You get a fully paid car, insurance, maintenance and fuel (even for personal driving). In addition, they cover your internet and cell phone bill while providing you with a laptop. The benefits include excellent health insurance, dental and 401K. Vacation time builds after a few years from 2-4 weeks.

    The pay is fairly decent for a new employee and climbs relatively fast based on your rating. You are pretty much guaranteed an annual salary and bonus increase unless you are basically inept. A new employee can expect to clear about 45-50K (give or take) without the expense of a car and gas, plus the random compensation of things listed above. After being with the company for about 5 years with no promotion, you can expect around 65-70K. Not bad. You receive a new Ford Fusion or Ford Escape every 3 years or 90K miles.

    This is a great company to build your resume and then move on. The sales training and skills you learn are outstanding and prepare you for almost any other career in sales, marketing, etc. When you are prepared to move on, most companies recognize that you are well trained and you are highly sought after.

    I must say, having worked for several fortune 500 companies, this company knows how to show employees a good time for their hard work. When you are traveling for business trips and training workshops, you receive nice meals, lodging, and plenty of drinks and entertainment.

    Most of the territory manager (entry level position) sales force are good, hard working people whom you are happy to call your peers. They come from all different ages and backgrounds, and each has something to offer you in the area of development and most are willing to help. There is a good feeling of camaraderie with most teams. You are also largely left alone and not micromanaged. If you are seeking a promotion, then this puts you under the microscope.

    The workload is realistic (almost easy) for about 7-8 months out of the year and ballistic for the other 4-5. There is no definite season for these times due to random price changes, tax increases, brand launches and strategy implementation.

    Cons

    This is a decent company, but it is not without its faults and it could be much better. For starters, initial training is something left to be desired. There is much to learn, especially in the first 6-12 months, and there is not much in the way of structured training. These include a complex (and inefficient) computer program, steps of a basic call, an ever changing pricing structure, brands and merchandising, certifications, administrative duties, etc. Much of this is left to your peers to train you. On the plus side, management does provide you with ample time to learn these things before holding you accountable for your performance.

    Most of the senior management that I have dealt with are actually competent people, but most of them are slaves to foolish corporate strategies. Once you have been around long enough to learn the business, you can start to see what will work and what is a bad idea. Half of management seems to have lost touch in this area. The other half forces a smile as they attempt to convince everyone how awesome the new (bad) ideas will be even when they know that we will soon be falling flat on our faces and scrambling to undo 3 months of pointless hard work in 80-120 outlets.

    I gave the CEO a thumbs down because while he is EXTREMELY intelligent, he and his counterparts are out of touch with what can be realistically achieved in the field to achieve sales growth and market share. The old CEO had the corporate strategy of "simple, bold, and focused" and we saw legitimate growth in the company for the first time in decades in this dieing industry due to smart and efficient decisions. When the new CEO took the reigns it was back to business as usual. This includes spinning our wheels while trying to implicate too many ideas at the same time which spreads our time in the field too thin. Much of this is spawns from following our competition (Philip Morris) around like puppy dogs, even when they are slowly dooming themselves to bankruptcy in the name of minimal market share gain.

    Be informed that we are known throughout the industry as the "whiny" company. Prepare yourself to put up a giant fuss over pennies or a product facing with all of your customers. There are 3 big players in this industry: Altria (Philip Morris), RJRT, and Lorillard. Altria is the king of the market, so they set many of the trends, they are very demanding, and they can get away with whatever they want because the industry needs them. Lorillard is in third place with mostly stagnant business having only one winning brand (Newport), and they are happy just being included in a business strategy. RJRT is stuck in the middle at a distant number two fighting tooth and nail for things that matter very little, and we end up making most large accounts so frustrated that they refuse to work with us.

    Promotion and company advancement are very possible, but not without jumping through multiple hoops and being charged with double standards. The company wants you to be an innovator and share new ideas and thoughts, but only if they coincide with whatever the corporate strategy happens to be at the time. Also, be prepared to be relocate and not end up where you ultimately wish to be. The good locations are often occupied by employees who want to remain where they are, so not much opens up except areas that are in the less desirable places in the country. The most you can realistically hope for is to be somewhat close to a desired atmosphere or your family. This is fine for an adventurous young graduate, but not for many others. On the plus side, the company does pay for you to move and provides you with a relocation bonus, even when you start. Upon your first promotion, they do the former plus cover any expenses of selling a house or breaking a lease.

    The bonus structure enrages most of the employees as well. For instance, corporate strategy for the past 4 years has been to kill off certain brands which are no longer seen as having growth potential. This means that we no longer promote them or provide these brands with any level of discounting. Fine, agreed. However, when these brands lose sales and market share (as they are intended to do) then our bonuses reflect on those losses and employees lose bonus money for performing what we were instructed to do.

    All in all, I would recommend this company to just about anyone looking to build their resume. If you are fine posting up anywhere to start over and grow your salary, you will also be happy. However, be prepared to relocate to an undesirable location, scratch your head at your monthly assignments, smile and nod, and be randomly disappointed with your bonus.

    content with the job at the moment because of the scarcity of other opportunities, and I have it good here overall, but a few changes would make all the difference.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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