Ryan, LLC

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Ryan, LLC Reviews

Updated June 30, 2014
Updated June 30, 2014
200 Reviews

4.0
200 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Ryan, LLC Chairman and CEO G. Brint Ryan
G. Brint Ryan
172 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Ability to set your own schedule and manage your own work-life balance (in 37 reviews)

  • The MyRyan program creates a flexible work environment that fits your schedule (in 29 reviews)


Cons
  • Ryan raves about work/life balance but doesn't let everyone take advantage of the myRyan work from home platform (in 8 reviews)

  • The commission/bonus structure isn't for the risk-averse (in 9 reviews)

More Highlights

26 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1.  

    Disappointing

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Manager
    Former Employee - Manager

    Pros

    Mostly nice and decent people. Decent benefits and pay. Well run training department.

    Cons

    Unless your a "Principal's Favorite" you can count on struggling for engagements. Attempts to distribute work based on the Team Resume concept doesn't work and Principals are still reluctant to give work to Managers they haven't worked with which makes success in management a crap shoot.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Do a better job at trying to keep the loyal and dedicated people you have; otherwise, you will continually be searching for new people to refill those spots.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Consulting

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Manager  in  Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Manager in Houston, TX

    Pros

    Excellent training program, CEO who truly walks the talk,diversified experience to be gained and excellent flex time program in theory.

    Cons

    Say they value experienced hires but then want to mold them into what they already have, people are promoted base on skill sets not managerial skills which creates principals and managers who have great consulting skills but horrible people skills, low pay for teams not in Dallas, need a better way of assigning reviews and the flex time creates a sense of never being off the clock.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Realize just because someone knows policies and procedures and brings in good results does not necessarily mean they will be a good manager. Too many principals and managers truly lack good people skills.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  3.  

    Good place to get a start

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Associate  in  Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Senior Associate in Los Angeles, CA

    Pros

    Flexible work schedules. Work was not charge hour focused but just getting the work done. Not a lot of overtime like other public accounting firms. Team oriented so hopefully you get along with your team.

    Cons

    Relatively small office in LA. If you don't like your team there is a lot of politics to switching teams similar to most places.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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  5.  

    Good work/life balance

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Dallas, TX
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dallas, TX

    Pros

    work/life balance was great. I got to work from home all the time.

    Cons

    There was not room for growth and the people were not very nice. You didn't feel like you were a part of anything.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6. 1 person found this helpful  

    Great place to start.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Consultant  in  Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Consultant in Boston, MA

    Pros

    A lot of freedom, flexible work schedule. Worked at home whenever I wanted. Even allowed me to live out-of-state and still excel at my job. Good place to acquire skills to break into a big four firm.

    Cons

    Not a lot of room to move up. Especially compared to other companies, there is not a lot of fostering of talent. Little to no client interaction at a low level.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Same response from superiors regardless of whether engagement level is high or low. Without room to grow (or at least to appearance of room to grow), there isn't a lot of motivation to be ambitious. The firm could be missing out on many rising professionals for this reason. Although maybe that doesn't matter, since the firm has a reputation internally for not promoting from within.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7.  

    If you want to be in tax, this is the place to be in terms of career development and growth.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Consultant, Sales and Use Tax  in  Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Consultant, Sales and Use Tax in Houston, TX

    Pros

    Strong management team with good growth potential.

    Cons

    Boring, lots of menial job tasks.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  8.  

    Okay for an entry level position

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Sales and Use Tax Consultant  in  Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Sales and Use Tax Consultant in Houston, TX

    Pros

    - Work/life balance
    - Time-off policies

    Cons

    - Low salary
    - High turnover rates

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  9. 2 people found this helpful  

    Terrible place to START your career

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Flexibility is how people describe, although it depends to some extent on the type of work you perform and your manager.

    Cons

    I've seen a few reviews state that Ryan is a great/good/decent place to start your career. Here's why it's the exact opposite:

    When you get hired, you're either an "experienced hire" or a regular hire. Experienced hires in this case may have direct experience (they come from a competitor where they performed the same basic job functions), or indirect experience (their previous work had direct similarities to their job at Ryan, but was not the same job; e.g. you worked for a REIT and now you'll be a property tax consultant).

    Experienced hires have significantly higher salaries, which makes sense since they are more valuable starting out. However, regular hires obviously become experienced at some point, but Ryan has no mechanism for recognizing this. Therefore, someone who comes in as a regular hire will generally always be paid significantly less than experienced hires regardless of results, education, ability, responsibilities, etc.

    Imagine two people, we'll call Ralph and Betsie who graduate college together. Ralph lands a new job as a Property Tax Consultant at Ryan, and Betsie lands the same job but at Ryan's competitor, Lame Tax Consulting. Ralph has a starting salary of $41,000 which he thinks is decent. Over the next 5 years, Ralph performs admirably and earns a 5% raise each year, now making $52,328. Betsie's company goes under and Betsie calls her old friend Ralph who manages to get her a job on his team in the same position he has. But Betsie is now an experienced hire, so Betsie gets hired at $70,000.

    Both Ralph and Betsie now have 5 years of experience, they have the same responsibilities, the tax savings they generate over the course of the next year is within $10,000 of one another - meaning their revenue is within a couple hundred dollars - but during his 5 years, Ralph also managed to earn a master's degree. When raise and promotion comes around in October, they will both earn 5%, now making $54,944 and $73,500, respectively. Ralph will never be paid what Betsie is paid, despite being equally valuable to the company (in some ways Ralph is more valuable because of his familiarity with Ryan's policies and procedures).

    Even if Ralph is promoted above Betsie, he will not catch up to her salary-wise. He may get 10% instead of 5% (though that is unusual).

    Ralph's only hope of being paid his market value is to leave Ryan, to the detriment of his team.

    Hence Ryan has created a system whereby it incentivizes the resources it has spent thousands of dollars training and grooming, to leave precisely when they become most valuable to the company.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Your starting salaries are fair for the most part. HR does a decent job of setting up the brackets. If anything, certain people are paid way more than they're worth in the beginning. But the compensation committee tends to base raises as a percentage increase of employees' existing salaries. The problem with this line of thinking is that for some people, at some point their existing salary becomes completely divorced from their value to the company.

    An extremely intelligent person who comes here straight out of college ready to prove themself is probably ok with his starting salary; but once he's proven himself, once he's gained valuable knowledge and training, once he's demonstrated that he can use that knowledge and training to consistently outperform his peers, no consideration is given. No adjustment is made. He gets the same congratulatory letter with the same 5% raise as his well-paid experienced-hire teammates who rely upon him to solve the complex problems they are incapable of solving.

    And therein lies the central flaw in the whole concept: how does the compensation committee, made up of people who have never met the individual or his teammates, who have no knowledge of the daily work the person performs, know that he solves these problems? How do they know his value to the company? How CAN they possibly? Especially when they overrule the suggestion of his manager (without even discussing it with the manager) who IS privy to this information.

    So I guess my suggestion is fairly simple, or maybe it's complex, I don't know.

    First, implement a sort of premium into the raise component for regular hires that reflects the experience they gain from working at Ryan. Make it a straight-line, accelerating, or diminishing increase, whichever makes the most sense in your opinion, for the first 3 - 5 years of employment, contingent upon results, performance evaluations, etc.

    Second, when the compensation committee asks for feedback from managers during the raise and promotion cycle, include information about performance relative to teammates as well as how their salaries compare. 5-10% salary variance among similarly qualified teammates based on experience, age, education, etc. seems acceptable, but 30% is indefensible without some performance-based reasoning.

    Third, to address the immediate disparity that exists from the absence to date of such a program, launch a review of salaries of normal hires with 3+ years of experience and seek extensive feedback from their managers with regard to their performance and perceived value relative to their experienced hire peers. Adjust salaries as needed.

    I also highly suggest that you look up the Equity Theory of Motivation - you can find it on Wikipedia if needs be - for why this is a much bigger problem than you might otherwise believe. WIN emails and workplace awards DO NOT motivate employees beyond the weak-minded, highly suggestible, and usually recent hires. Long-term motivation is impossible when your teammates are making 150% of your salary for the same (or less) work, and attrition is inevitable.

    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  10. 2 people found this helpful  

    Liked the company until things started 'slipping off its axis...'

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Executive Assistant  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Executive Assistant in New York, NY

    Pros

    Brint Ryan has been committed to implementing programs and benefits that will better serve his employees. The company has come a long way and I liked the changes that were made.
    The increased flexibility has been good for most employees.
    I was able to work with many functions in my administrative role and build a network of support that helped me better assist those in my office.
    I felt like I could contribute and implement processes and that was welcomed in the office.
    It was a nice place to work until egos got in the way.

    Cons

    Not sure if exit interviews are used for the stated purposes. Exit interviews/pre-exit interview was used to send out behind the scenes email to leadership team to trash personal reputation and performance. This was just unbelievable and quite disappointing.

    Raise system needs to be reviewed. Never had a formal review. Had to approach management when I sensed something was wrong. That's when the floodgate opened with all of these "issues". What happened to ongoing communication and coaching from the "LEADERSHIP" ranks? Attestations regarding data entry errors were not my fault, but it was easy to blame it on "the help."

    Company pushes fitness and wellness on a corporate level, but on the local level the managers had a problem with it. What I did on my unpaid lunch break became a sore spot for management and I couldn't understand why.

    Management complains about outside interests as if that were a crime. Making a one word generic LinkedIn profile containing "entrepreneur" should not have been raised to me as a bad thing. How dare I think more of myself than just being an admin? Apparently it was felt that I had some nerve to describe myself in that way.

    Pay not competitive for admin roles in NYC, but the expectations on how your attitude should be was as if they were paying you big bucks. Make the salary match what you want out of the person so they won't have to think about doing something else outside of work.

    Manager wanted a so-called "Dallas-like" personality as if I had not been professional in the 6.5 years that I had been there. I had "lasted" because I had did a good job and got things done. Not because someone was doing me any favors by letting me stay around.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Don't use exit interviews to send out emails on employee performance to 'beat' the publication of what was said by the exiting person. Let them have their say as their last rites.

    Honestly I tried to "protect" certain people because I genuinely liked them, but it was all for nothing apparently. So disappointed that email happened after 6 months as a temp making less than $14/hour, then after another 6 years as a FT employee? I proved I was dedicated, and it was the longest that I ever worked anywhere. And all of what I did was trashed. All because I said "office environment" as the reason for me leaving the company. That's the thanks I got. Wow.

    Communicate your expectations to employees and don't let things escalate to a point of no return.

    Let people be who they want to be outside of work and on their LinkedIn accounts. I represented the company JUST FINE being the person I was when I was off the clock.

    Keep expectations professional and not personal. A manager being upset because he wasn't (quote) "number one" to me was a bit much. Especially to the person that you barely spoke to, who didn't get a raise, a bonus, and was getting paid below market rate. Honestly, making you feel 'number one' is a job for your spouse. I wasn't getting paid enough to be anyone's Edith Bunker.

    People are individuals. Never tell anyone to 'be like' another person. Statements like "Be like the ladies in Dallas", or be like this person or that person is not how supervisors should coach employees. People will become resentful when things are stated in that way. That's like saying "I wish you would be more like my ex-wife or ex-husband." Focus on SKILLS and CHARACTERISTICS that you would like emulated. I'm sure any HR professional will tell you that as well. Management needs training in coaching employees at that company big time.

    I was honest in everything that I said in my conversations regarding my exit. Manager felt betrayed and I have no idea why when I was the one who served my head on a platter and left voluntarily. I did that to make others happy...not myself. But in the end I didn't even get credit for that. I put others before myself and I was still made out to be a bad employee anyway in some email. So no matter what I did, I just couldn't win.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  11.  

    Plenty of freedom, not much money.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Consultant, Property Tax  in  Cleveland, OH
    Current Employee - Consultant, Property Tax in Cleveland, OH

    Pros

    Lots of freedom in your work/life balance. Easy to work from home. Work is not monotonous and gives plenty of opportunity to network.

    Cons

    Salaries are way too low compared to other tax consulting firms, regardless of the fact that the CEO brags about being better than the Big 4.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Set salaries to attract talent away from the other tax consulting firms rather than paying large finder bonuses for recruiting people from those firms. That makes me feel like you value people fro other companies more than your own employees.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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