Skechers U.S.A. Reviews

Updated September 25, 2014
Updated September 25, 2014
96 Reviews
2.8
96 Reviews
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Skechers U.S.A. Chairman and CEO Robert Greenberg
Robert Greenberg
54 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Great core values, with a great focus on customer experience (in 4 reviews)

  • Very Easy job expect in a huge store with no hours then it becomes quite the challenge more workload on less ppl for same amount of money (in 4 reviews)


Cons
  • At Store Manager level, there's not much room for advancement within the company unless you are willing to relocate to California (in 4 reviews)

  • Keeping your store staffed with part time assistant managers is honestly the biggest joke of them all (in 5 reviews)

More Highlights

19 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

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  1.  

    Un realistic

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - First Assistant Manager  in  Woodbridge, NJ
    Former Employee - First Assistant Manager in Woodbridge, NJ

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A. full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Flexible schedule
    Easy Job
    Only thing you have to sell is shoes

    Cons

    Compensation
    Very small store
    Unrealistic goals
    Upper Management Not helpful

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    May be if they can worry less about 2 shoe per customer it'll be better

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2.  

    Worst Sales Job of All Time!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Sales Associate  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Sales Associate in New York, NY

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A. full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Easy to get to.

    Cons

    You had to sell 2 pairs of shoes to get any commission added to your check.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Realize that your employees have bills to pay!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3.  

    Horrible

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Skechers U.S.A.

    Pros

    Fair discount, plenty of hours for scheduling

    Cons

    upper management is a joke, DM would call and scream in your ear

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Train staff properly, not by someone who is quiting

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5. 9 people found this helpful  

    You decide!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Store Manager
    Current Employee - Store Manager

    I have been working at Skechers U.S.A. full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Overall culture of the company is positive and upbeat. You get to wear some of the most comfortable shoes in the industry, but you also have to wear only styles/colors available in your store. Honest, yet overly obsessive focus on a unique customer experience that has a tendency to anger customers off and push them away. Respectful drive to continue to be a leader in the shoe industry. Pay is average to below average and a percentage of bonuses are reachable as long as you do not have a new store. If and only when sales are running, commission and (the almost extinct) spiffs are attainable. In-store relations with employees and managers is consistent with any retail job, but can be better for very brief stints of time when the expectations are limited to just selling and not other countless overindulgent responsibilities. Communications between stores tends to be more decent than not, although usually only occurring when someone else's customer needs a shoe that is not available in their own store. Area and Regional Management try to be encouraging and optimistic with expectations and goals, but tend to sound more like robots with the same repetitive information. Training is supposed to be two weeks long and is mostly taught through a packet. Point of Sale system is easy to use for the purpose of sales, but takes some time to really learn based on how old and confusing it can be. As long as you've been there for a certain amount of time (six months?), you will be treated to a yearly boisterous and expensively planned convention/party in Los Angeles with other store managers from around the world (and most of the corporate executives). Most of the time you are able to leave the store for lunch/dinner breaks, but that is only if your store can actually provide the appropriate coverage and maintain a full management staff. Discounts on shoes are better for managers than associates, but are limited to four pairs of shoes at 50% off and two pairs of shoes at 25% off per month, without the option of saving/borrowing from previous/future months. Accessories may be purchased at 25% off and Apparel discounts are also available IF your store actually sells clothing and corporate doesn't consider something you wear to be an "accessory". Originally managers were able to charge out new styles of shoes to themselves and other employees to help promote various new product trends or as a reward for hard work, but have recently lost that privilege due to gross negligence by others. Health benefits are available at a fair price and offer pretty good coverage based on your selection. Stock options are available as well as the expected 401k, Long/Short Term Disability, and Life Insurance benefits.

    Cons

    Most, if not all of their operational technology is severely outdated. The company does not use wifi or the internet, so if the company's intra-net server goes down... good luck because EVERYONE is stuck. One of the newest and most exciting advancements they are currently working on is "e-mail" to and from managers and stores... imagine that! The Point of Sale system is so out of date and difficult to learn that it often takes numerous steps to complete vital and often repetitive tasks. Instead of spending money where it might help the employees do a faster and more efficient job, they put all of their cash into big screen TVs and credit card machines that offer perfect blue signatures and have miniature TV screens on them (all to ensure that they get their money fast and effectively I'm sure). Online ordering through the store is NOT an option because of how old the system is, but you can call another store (if anyone actually has it) and ask them to ship it to the customer. Try explaining that concept to a customer and see how they look at you! Multiple times I found myself walking a customer through an online purchase on their phone or offering my cell phone because they did not have a smart phone or were unwilling to use any of their data plan for something they felt we should already be able to do at our computer.

    Skechers has created their own version of a mission statement as to how they would like each customer handled, called "The Promise". Most of the concept is not unfair or unreasonable, but some of it is downright overwhelming and a major turn-off to certain customers. You will have to greet every customer almost immediately as they walk in the store and ask how their day is going. Too bad if you have a million other things required of you and an already busy store to handle, as you will have already failed the first part of a Secret Shop. You must ask to size every pair of feet and offer additional styles regardless of if they only wanted something specific. Most people do not want you near their feet and generally quite a few of them are quite confident in their size, but if you don't clearly offer to measure you will fail your Secret Shop! The hardest and most unrealistic request is to obtain their name in the "name exchange" to create a unique shopping experience. Unless they are older or more mature, it just doesn't make much sense to most customers and a majority of people tend to be creeped out by it. Not doing it results in a failed Secret Shop again! Other than walking the bag around the counter and thanking customer's for their business, which are both great in my opinion, you must also have the manager on duty ask each and every customer "how was your service today?" before they leave. What if you were the manager and the only one selling? Another way to make an easy and final moment become uncomfortable and awkward. The expectations to do this with every customer is absolutely absurd. And by the way, failed Secret Shops will cost you your job.

    You must complete all necessary work within a strict 40 hour time period and cannot go into overtime without it resulting in negative documentation against you. If you have a high volume store, complicated floor plan, massive irregular shipments, or a consistently under-staffed store, you still must follow the same rules no matter what. It was safe to say that I averaged at least 45-50 hours per week in the store, with 5-10 hour "pretending" to be on the clock so that I would not get in trouble. I'm sure that the US Dept. of Labor would love to know that about what really goes on behind the scenes.

    Keeping your store staffed with part time assistant managers is honestly the biggest joke of them all. Unless you have a high enough volume store, forget having any other full time employees other than yourself. The best and usually only option is to hire students that do not need a second job. Almost anyone else that you may hire will either use the title and store name to jump to a full time management position somewhere else, potentially even with a direct competitor if you're really lucky! Part time managers receive a slightly higher number of discounts and maybe $1-2 more an hour, but no paid time off or any other meaningful benefits that might actually keep them there. In less than one calender year, I had over 10 different assistant managers come and go, more often than not because of a full time management job. Unless any of your associates have perfectly clean records, good luck promoting them, even if they are an instrumental part of your store. As with any retail job, anyone and everyone will be considered expendable, regardless of how good of a job you do and how long you've worked there.

    Recruiting and hiring in general can have it's challenges as expected. Recruiting new assistant managers to complete your team when you do not have enough to run a store, leaves corporate or area management with the cheap task of putting free job posts on Craigslist. After all, more often than not, you get what you pay for... which ends up being a whole lot of nothing based on what I've seen come through the stores. How can you leave to recruit better managers if you don't have the coverage to leave the store to do so? Oh wait, that's right... add more time off the clock to do what is necessary to get who you want. Catch 22 is that you can only offer a part time assistant manager job with very limited benefits. No full time manager of any value will jump ship for that, so it leaves you with glorified associates at best. Depending on the mall, you're walk-ins may or may not be of worth. Unfortunately, Skechers as a brand is still in a long recovery process to get away from the "cheap clunky shoes" image it created ages ago and thus most candidates between the age of 16-25 won't even consider the idea of working for such a brand unless they happen to love the shoes. Associates will always fight over wanting more hours, as to be expected with any retail store. Now, when each store is supposed to have one full time store manager and three assistant managers, the hours can only be spread so many ways, leaving some associates very dissatisfied. The company is very strict with how they want recruiting done and do not approve of public postings on social media websites, even if it does get you a better candidate much faster!

    Training can be almost impossible at times. You are not offered any hours to train and are then forced to schedule associates and managers alike to be your sales person and just do your best to find time their shift. Good luck if you have a store with steady traffic because you mine as well just hand the new hire the training packet and let them learn on their own. The result of this means that most of your new hires will be thrown to the fire and forced to learn as they go as opposed to being trained the right way the first time.

    Inventory of each shoe is taken at least once a month after hours and must also be scheduled without additional hours. Average count can take upwards of 2 hours with about 3-4 people, meaning 6-8 hours on top of normal business requirements.

    Commission used to be decent until they realized that customers only wanted to buy during sale periods, so corporate reduced the percentages to offset the change in prices and protect themselves from losing additional money in their own pockets. Spiffs used to be offered on a weekly or monthly basis, but have literally almost become a forgotten entity. At one point you could make upwards of $5 for selling a few different styles of shoes, but now you'd be lucky to get $3 for a single style now. Between the two, you can certainly count on a noticeable loss of income.

    I am still amazed today at how much money is spent on pointless marketing and signage that either looks identical to other recent versions or ends up never being used. This company literally has tourette's syndrome and dual personality disorder when it comes to anything dealing with displays, signs, and/or promotions. Today they want this, tomorrow they want that, but oh wait... they want it back to it's original form again. Absolutely ridiculous and a huge waste of time, money, and man power. At one point, I literally had six different sale signs that said the exact same thing, except they were only different colors!

    Promotions are just hilarious at times. Until they realize that most customers don't understand anything other than Buy One Get One 50% Off, they will continue to have people shaking their heads and buying less. I can't even tell you how many times I was asked why we were running BOGO 30% or BOGO 40% and not the normal BOGO 50%. I personally suggested multiple times that they consider a different sale or methodology, but it's obvious where that went. The biggest joke of all was when the company wanted to run a Valentine's Day Sale of 14% Off the Entire Store. That's right, 14% off... because it's the 14th of February an all. It took some dedicated time to change the all marketing, put up some very large and challenging window clings, hang festive sale banners... all for the sale to run less than an entire business day.

    Visual Displays are based on what corporate would like to have on each shelf, problem is, stores rarely have the shoes shown and you have to improvise. No matter what you do though, your improvisation will never be as good or the way your own manager would have liked it. Shelves have a limit to the number of shoes you can display, so what happens when you have way too many? Instead of trying to sell through them and help reduce the stock, they would much rather you stock the older shoes in the back and wait an eternity for a transfer request from an outlet store. More options for the customers are always better than dead weight in the back. After all, you can't sell what they can't see. Keeping the shoes organized and straight is understood, but hopefully your manager won't make a visit just after a large family of hooligans has just raided your store. Not enough time to work miracles and they just never seem to care or understand that which can often be reality. Good luck with the kids shoes, as it's more of a sick joke to try and keep it neat and not it's common chaotic state.

    The free bubble gum machine is a great idea for the kids, but a horrible idea for the adults and customers that can actually afford your shoes. Countless seniors and/or anyone trying on shoes near that damn thing
    would more often than not be turned off and potentially walk out. You can't put a broken sign on it to stop kids from coming in and you can't stop filling it with gum balls, or else you'll get in trouble.

    The return policy is one of the best, yet worst concepts adopted. Too many people are aware of the policy and how the company will stand by their product. You will be handed shoes that have been worn all over the world, smell like hell, look like dirt, and are literally hanging on by a thread... but you'll have to try and make the customer happy by offering a store credit towards a new pair. If you don't, the customer will most likely call customer service, who will then call your manager, who will then ask you to make the "exception" and even throw in a bonus for the inconvenience.

    Weekly and monthly paperwork used to be unreasonable, taking more of your time off the floor and away from who matters the most, the customer. They designed a packet to help reduce paperwork, but did so without training or much explanation. Dry erase boards with repetitive sales information seem to be a real thing for them as well. I thought that is what computers and simple paperwork was for?

    Employee discounts are nice to a degree, but become unfair and restricted once you find multiple shoes that you may want to buy in one month or need to return something for whatever reason. "Borrowing" discounts from other employees within your store is frowned against. You cannot get back the discounts you never used from prior months, regardless of how much money you spend and that they are almost always being purchased for in-store use. Discounts may be used for anyone, including friends and family, but due to the limitation is is consistently a fight to make everyone close to you happy because they may have to wait a few months just to get a stupid discount off of one pair of shoes.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1) Scrap the Promise. It has it's merits and means well, but the system is wrong. The true focus needs to be on every customer getting the best possible service and not focusing on how Skechers wants every customer's experience to go. One of the biggest keys to selling is getting to know your customer and molding your approach to them. Forcing a planned out type of service is not unique or special, rather, it is robotic and far from genuine.

    2) Standing by your product is important and honorable, but there has to be a limit to everything. Customers are learning more and more each day about how they can purchase shoes somewhere else and return them, bring back old worn out shoes, and/or put up a scene with a barely worn shoe just to get something newer or cleaner. Social media is growing and word travels even faster now. Reduce your Return Policy to 90 Days, 6 months, or even 1 year. Continuing to return or exchange unnecessary product results in more of trade program and only reduces the potential for an increase in sales.

    3) Listen to Store Managers more. They are your front line and probably have a much better idea of what is best for the customer. Although District and Regional Managers offer an insight, they are only vessels in which only a portion of information gets through.

    4) Stop wasting countless money on unnecessary signage, promotions, and marketing. Your commercials are working and your banners look great, but you don't have to have something new every week or update your store so often. Return customers only get confused and uncomfortable in environments that change so sporadically. Better planning and less micro-managing from the executive level would do wonders!

    5) Pay your managers a little more, offer salaries as an option, or be more understanding with necessary overtime. Not every store or every situation is the same. If it wasn't for the fact that we all have been threatened with our jobs for not going over 40 hours or working off the clock, I'm sure that you all would be amazed as to how many people actually work over and beyond the time shown on their time cards. At some point, this will catch up with you and then the U.S. Department of Labor will be at your doorstep wanting to investigate Wage & Hour claims.

    6) Training hours are something that shouldn't even be a debate. If you want your stores to offer the best possible service, they need to be trained fast and efficiently without interruption. Customers will feel confident and comfortable to buy more if your employees feel confident and comfortable with how and what to sell. Would 8-16 hours for associates and 20-40 hours for managers be asking too much for something to be done right the first time?

    7) Bulk Count takes place after hours, thus hours should be made available in addition to sales hours to ensure accuracy the first time. Secondary/Re-Counts only hurt the customers because the hours are then pulled from the sales floor to cover the added work.

    8) Standard Concept Stores should have a management team that consists of 1 Store Manager, 1 Full Time Assistant Manager, 1-2 Part Time Assistant Manager(s), and 1-2 Part Time Sales Lead(s)/Associate(s). In most markets, this set-up would ensure less turn-over with management staff and encourage better recruits to consider Skechers as a viable option for employment. It also presents the idea to grow within a store by moving up level by level, instead of having to look for a new store to move up.

    9) The International Convention was awesome, but also very expensive to plan and setup. Although most of us enjoy spending time in Los Angleles with co-workers, I'm pretty sure that even more of us would appreciate that excess money in our paycheck or going towards time off with our families. Just a thought.

    10) Our economy is far from back to where it should be. Sales and promotions are almost a requirement today. Stick to BOGO 50 and stop frustrating your customers with anything less or offer alternatives or unique incentives.

    11) Elite Memberships should be tied into our Point of Sale systems. More customers would trust it and sign up if we could actually help them with the program in the store.

    12) Finally... stop wasting time and just upgrade your damn operating systems already. Everything else in the store looks new and trendy, yet your technology puts you back the 90's and beyond. Between the money you would save on a convention, better marketing management, and refined customer service... you might be surprised what you can afford!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  6. 2 people found this helpful  

    Very behind the times, unrealistic goals, no real support of store staff from corporate

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Store Manager
    Former Employee - Store Manager

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A. full-time

    Pros

    Friendly people, great coworkers
    Good product
    Decent discount
    Chance for advancement for lower tiered employees

    Cons

    Corporate doesn't understand or care about challenges stores face on a daily basis, it's all about sales numbers and payroll no matter what else is going on-weather, don't have enough/correct product, huge projects that they want finished immediately, etc.
    No commission or spiffs for Outlet or Warehouse stores
    Outdated POS systems
    Completely unrealistic or changing goals for store management. Monthly plans seem to be either made up out of thin air or are set to make sure you can't make bonus
    Payroll standards are usually too low with no room to increase them even when sales are much higher than expected or projects are added
    Pay is VERY low even for retail but hiring standards are very high
    No localization of product or pricing, just because a shoes doesn't sell in California that doesn't necessarily mean it wont sell in the Midwest or East, or vice versa
    Corporate does not really listen to its Store Managers even though it expects a lot from them

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Listen to the people who deal with your customers on a daily basis
    Update your systems
    Pay your people if you want to attract and retain quality employees
    Support your stores and have some flexibility

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    To Cut Costs= 20 years back in technology

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - First Assistant Manager  in  Orlando, FL
    Current Employee - First Assistant Manager in Orlando, FL

    I have been working at Skechers U.S.A. full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Easy responsibility, you're selling shoes. Thats it!

    Cons

    Corporate structure is less concerned with local store issues only with bottom line numbers. It is extremely autocratic in the fact that store managers and at times even the district managers have very little say in what actually go on within their respective stores.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Join the 21st century. Be more proactive about updating training manuals, contact information, operating procedures and streamline your intranet to a point it makes since and you don't have to have a background in computer science to find a simple form to print off. And why the heck are you still using fax machines? Better inventory controls, allow more labor hours to provide better coverage and to ensure all little tasks are completed.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Great as an associate, extremely difficult as a manager

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Second Assistant Manager
    Former Employee - Second Assistant Manager

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A. full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    As an associate:

    -Easy to understand standards, as most of your direction will come from your Assistant/Store Manager, who you will work closely with
    -VERY friendly work place
    -Great start as a first job, or as a stepping stone to bigger and better things. If you prove you're a hardworking employee, promotion is a very real possibility.

    As an Assistant Manager:

    -Great stepping stone to bigger and better things.
    -A lot of time is spent in the store without your boss around, so as long as you can plan and execute well without falling behind, it's fairly stress free
    -Employee discount is OK, not terrible, but not amazing either. No other benefits.

    Cons

    As an associate:

    -Very physically demanding. Shipment once a week and on a busy day, you will be running around more often than not.
    -You'll probably be working harder than your pay will show
    -Bosses will either be your best friend, or your worst enemy. As a manager, I personally am out there working harder than anybody, setting the standard. Other managers have no problem sitting behind the register all day dictating work for you to execute.
    -Hours can at times, be very inconsistent.

    As an Assistant Manager:

    -VERY unclear standards. It feels like standards go through the game 'telephone' where you will never get a consistent answer when asking around to different stores/districts/DMs. Example: Display standards are "constantly changing," and by constantly changing I mean change depending on who visits your store last and wants you to change it.
    -Expectations set by DM are often way off the mark. It feels like the DMs don't really understand what it's like to work the sales floor, and as a result set either unrealistically high, or severely low expectations.
    -Failure is a direct reflection of you. You missed sales for the day? Well that sucks, because they don't care that there was 2 feet of snow on the ground. I'm being a bit dramatic, but missing sales goals is viewed as a direct reflection of management.
    -Not sure if it's just my store, but don't plan on having a full staff. In the last 1.5 years, we've never had a full management team.
    -The pay.....
    -The company as a whole seems to be both stuck in the stone age (WAY outdated Point of Sale system) and unorganized. Putting three different window updates in one day is a good way to annoy employees. Setting deadlines for when tasks should be completed without giving us the tools to complete the task until AFTER the deadline means you need to be flexible to each store making decisions that may not be exactly what you want. And the marketing is really off point, adult men don't want to buy a shoe because Joe Montana can catch a burglar with a football....

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Store Managers: Spend some time working as hard as us associates do. Just because you're payed more doesn't mean you're above cleaning up the mess of a family of foreigners.

    District Managers: Be a little more flexible and willing to listen. If I ask you a question, respond to what I said, don't just give me the same cookie cutter answer you do every time. And realize we are not stupid, this company is wildly out of date and unorganized, the issue needs to be addressed, not swept under the rug.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9. 2 people found this helpful  

    Great benefits but beware of management.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A.

    Pros

    Great benefits and flexible schedules. Co-workers are awesome.

    Cons

    Management needs to improve and need to also have their employees back.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 2 people found this helpful  

    Branding also applies to your employees

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Assistant Manager  in  Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Assistant Manager in Boston, MA

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A. part-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Good discounts
    Good education on footwear
    Met the owners countless times, very nice
    Reimbursement if you're sent to other stores

    Cons

    Poor pay and poor compensation on sales
    Low resources for success vs. High expectations
    Accountability leans towards blame game
    No recognition for successes
    Employees are viewed as disposable
    Highly aggressive when it comes to new products or "initiatives" with no incentives
    Disorganized
    Computer systems are old and therefore slow(my store still ran on dial-up)
    Frugal
    No room for advancement, promotions were rarely given unless desperate. (They will literally sit on vacant positions just to save money)
    Does not promote from within
    Unfair treatment
    If management(whether PT or FT) you're going to lose all "aspects" of your life
    If you own a car, you're going to be sent all around the district

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Branding means as much to your employees as it does your customers. If you want your retail workers to put their best feet forward, you have to inspire through positivity not negativity. The company is young and it shows in its frugality, aggressiveness, and overall treatment(poor) of it's staff and as such, it creates a hostile environment.
    Find the balance between "positive" aggression towards goals while not destroying your image. Customers CAN see the poor treatment

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  11. 1 person found this helpful  

    Couldn't wait to give my two weeks.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Store Manager  in  Las Vegas, NV
    Former Employee - Store Manager in Las Vegas, NV

    I worked at Skechers U.S.A. full-time

    Pros

    The only part of Skechers that was rewarding was that you had some great people you got to know. This was one of the only reason I stayed for so many years ; and the pay isn't so bad.

    Cons

    The upper management is crazy, they would expect you to work miracles with very little payroll. It is a very labor intensive job and corporate likes to constantly change their visual directives.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More task hours would have been awesome, and more positive feedback.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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