U.S. News & World Report

  www.usnews.com
  www.usnews.com

U.S. News & World Report Reviews

22 Reviews
3.0
22 Reviews
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Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
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William D. Holiber
9 Ratings

6 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

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  1.  

    Good early career experience, Not great for long more than a couple years

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Editorial Staff in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Editorial Staff in Washington, DC

    I worked at U.S. News & World Report full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    U.S. News & World Report is still pretty well known. For reporters, that means a lot of great access. The editors give their reporters a lot of autonomy in choosing stories.

    Cons

    The morale of the workplace was pretty dismal. There was an expectation from management to churn for traffic growth, with minimal encouragement to produce quality, enterprise work. It seemed as if everyone just wanted to speed out the door ASAP every evening. They didn't give any raises (not even a COLA) and there was little money available for reporters to travel or cover events outside of the DC metro area.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    U.S. News & World Report Response

    Aug 15, 2014Sr. Vice President, operations

    This comment was probably had some validity during the difficult years as we transitioned from print to digital. However, the company has been very successful in making the transition. Moral is ... More

  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Smart people, hard times.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Ad Operations
    Former Employee - Ad Operations

    I worked at U.S. News & World Report full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Some of the smartest, nicest, funniest people I've ever worked with. I made true friends here.

    This was the best job I'd ever had up until that point. Was given a good amount of autonomy to make advertising decisions (at least at the beginning).

    Management was competent and agreeable. Really listened to concerns.

    Excellent work/life balance, generous vacation policy as long as you finished your work.

    Opportunity to learn by going to conferences (at the beginning of my tenure).

    Cons

    Once I was switched to a new team, job quality went downhill. Wasn't allowed to make any important advertising decisions unless my new manager (who did not come from an online advertising background) could sign off on it.

    Pay lower than average for the field and area.

    Very high turnover among the journalists in DC and sales in NYC.

    Too much infighting between editorial and sales made it very difficult to get new, innovative ad technologies through. A lot of people who didn't understand or care to understand the advantages of various ad tech products that could increase revenue for the company.

    A dying brand and no longer considered a serious news company in DC circles. The business lies in its education, auto, and hospital rankings. Content is simply fodder for pageviews and ad dollars.

    Very little chance for advancement, especially for women.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Laying off the VP of Sales was a good start. Hire sales and ad ops leaders who are native to digital and understand ad tech.

    Incentivize sales to actually sell premium products and not rely so much on third parties to monetize

    Invest in a solid data management plan. Between all the products, the ad inventory, and traffic data, there's plenty of 1st and 2nd party data to analyze and derive insights from.

    The CEO is a good guy but should be more resolute when it comes to decision making, particularly in resolving intradepartmental disputes.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  3.  

    Tough times ....

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Web Producer in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Web Producer in Washington, DC

    I worked at U.S. News & World Report

    Pros

    Generally, the folks that work here are good people. At one time it was a pretty vibrant place, but since the ad market fell apart they can't really afford to do journalism anymore.

    Cons

    They've lost site of their editorial mission and let go of most of the senior writers and editors. It's sad to see them morph into being just a cheaper version of Consumer Reports.

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
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  5.  

    Good, but not permanent

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Front End Web Developer in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Front End Web Developer in Washington, DC

    I have been working at U.S. News & World Report

    Pros

    Some good people work here, and management is solid at providing for the employees what they need. The technology given, at least to IT staff, is very nice (powerful macs).

    Cons

    The web infrastructure is confusing. The site is built on several different frameworks, and redesigns have been implemented in pieces, then new redesigns are started in different areas. Things are hacked together just to get it working. There's new effort to consolidate code and make this better, though.

    No opinion of CEO
  6.  

    Bad Communication

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY

    I worked at U.S. News & World Report

    Pros

    Great benefits/work-life balance. Very easy going when you have to take vacation or do something for your personal life- better then other companies

    Cons

    No internal reviews or chats about how you're doing you job good or bad. They keep on many employees that have no skills and lay off people who are actually doing their jobs

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Better communication, hard place to work because some of the managers are disrespectful to many employees. It's hard to feel respected when your coworkers aren't.

    No opinion of CEO
  7.  

    Good stepping stone to a better career

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at U.S. News & World Report

    Pros

    Good resources for learning and research, nice location, relatively friendly colleagues, recognizable name, working alongside some of the best journalists in the business.

    I worked here several years ago, before the publishing world meltdown and when the magazine was still a weekly publication. This seemed like a great job for me to transition to after working for a non-profit (e.g., crap salary). Not only was it a recognizable name for my resume, but I was given the opportunity to work on different content each week instead of doing the same thing over and over.

    Additionally, there were a few "dead week" periods during the year where the magazine wasn't published and employees were allowed to take some time off without using vacation time.

    Cons

    No vacation during first 6 months, crappy health insurance (at the time, United Healthcare/MAMSI)

    Right after I joined the company, three of my senior colleagues/managers left within two months to join another firm, which made for high tension and a less-than-friendly work environment. I felt micromanaged and not allowed to have much of a work-life balance, which made me resentful and bitter about the job. Additionally, our division was not allowed to use dead week time off, even though we were told otherwise at the beginning. Once the first manager left, it became sort of a "jump ship" mentality and made me feel like upper management wasn't doing everything they could to retain quality employees.

    From what I remember, there weren't exactly many learning/training opportunities (e.g., college credit), although that may since changed or I may be incorrect.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    It's hard enough that USN is probably the least popular of the Big 3, and has probably lost subscribers with the shift to a monthly -- Time, Newsweek, and USN -- but make sure the ratings issues continue to be accurate and worth the subscription money, since that's what seems to be the only cash cow for them.

    No opinion of CEO

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