Apple
3.9 of 5 3,105 reviews
www.apple.com Cupertino, CA 5000+ Employees

Apple Interview Questions & Reviews in California

Updated Apr 16, 2014
All Interviews Received Offers

Getting the Interview 

56%
13%
13%

Interview Experience 

61%
24%
14%

Interview Difficulty 

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46 people found this helpful

Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Difficult Interview

Manufacturing Engineer Interview

Manufacturing Engineer
Cupertino, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 2 months - interviewed at Apple.

Interview Details – I was contacted by an Apple recruiter who had come across my resume on Monster or some other site that I had it on. The position was for the manufacturing group for mobile devices. It wasn't my typical area of expertise as I'm more design focused, but I have an extensive background in manufacturing and machining, so It seemed like a good time to make a change. I had a quick phone call with the recruiter and was asked the standard questions regarding why I was looking for a job, was I willing to relocate, etc. After this brief (10 minute) phone interview, I received an email and scheduled another brief phone interview with another recruiter, then again with a hiring manager.

The conversation with the hiring manager was very technically focused on manufacturing processes, plastics, metals, composites, tooling, machine tools, inspection, surface finishing, treatments, etc. This was about 30 minutes and the manager was a pleasure to talk to. He had a great sense of humor and the conversation although technical, was enjoyable and relaxed.

Following this I received an email and was invited for an on site interview. The Apple travel site takes care of your airfare, hotel, and rental car and is very efficient.

The on site interview was about 5 hours, meeting with someone every 30 minutes. The bulk of the interviews consisted of a bunch of Apple products and pieces being placed in front of me and discussions on how they were produced, tooling to manipulate them, ensuring accuracy, how surface finishes were produced, why things were done a certain way, how I would do them, and so on.

Everyone I met with was light hearted and seemed to have a sense of humor. All incredibly bright individuals and seemed to really enjoy what they were doing. All in all it was pretty intense, but if you know your stuff there shouldn't be anything unexpected. I was pleased that they didn't give me any brain teasers or abstract stuff like that. It was all straight to the point and was a good test of my manufacturing knowledge.

My advice to anyone in any interview situation is that if you don't know something, admit it. Don't try and BS your way through, especially in a group like I was in, as they will see through it. If you don't know something, just say so. My plastics experience is limited, so when technical questions about plastics and over molding came into the equation, I was up front and told them I knew about the process and could describe it to them, but had no hands on experience in it.

Also, make sure you can back up every single thing you put on your resume. If you have a lot of fluff in there it's going to come out in the interview process.

Lastly, don't show up empty handed. Bring examples of your work and show them how diverse your skill set is and why they should hire you. It's also a great for you to be able to talk intelligently about all the things you've done and explain your thought process behind them. This is what a lot of people you interview with are looking for.

Interview Question – This was a very 'hands on' interview. No BS questions, but know every manufacturing process you can, regardless how abstract. Same goes for surface finishing, treatments, and manufacturing automation. Also Apple does things very differently, cost is second to quality, So where other manufacturers are stamping sheet metal and molding things out of cheap pot metal, Apple is CNC'ing components, has incredibly tight tolerances, and is highly automated.   View Answers (2)

Negotiation Details – I initially received an offer from the recruiter verbally outlining my base salary, sign on bonus, relocation package, stock options, etc. They called me a few days later notifying me that the official offer was in the mail via FedEx next day air, and they had increased the base salary and sign on bonus that he had initially given me. It wasn't a massive increase in pay compared to what I was currently making, but it was enough to get me to accept, and was what I expected the job to pay. Certain things seem pretty set from a corporate standpoint (vacation days, stock vesting period, etc.) so I'm not sure how much negotiation room there actually is. Either way, I was happy with the offer they made me, and I accepted.

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3 people found this helpful

Declined Offer

Neutral Experience

Difficult Interview

Operations Engineering Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Cupertino, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Apple in January 2014.

Interview Details – First phone interview, about just 15 mins with HR, just basic personal information, checking on interest in apple and specific jobs. later on, 1 phone interview with Hiring Manager, and then brought onsite to meet 8 peoples consisting of hiring manger, team members and counterpart from Engineering team.

Apple travel coordinate takes care of hotel, flight most everything for you, which is nice.

When onsite, I was basically told by everyone except for HM, that the Operations Engineering (including Technical Program Manger, Ops Program Manger, and Manufacturing design and quality engineers) are incredibly demanding. I was told that you basically have to devoted yourself to Apple, working 6 days a week, working EVERY night 9-11pm concalling with Asian team. They absolutely expect you to respond emails Sunday night since it would be Monday morning in Asia. You also have to travel to Asia very frequently, spending roughly 30% about 90 days per year in Asia, maybe more in some roles or some groups. work/life would be a joke here.
That also explains that some groups in operations have more than 50% turnover rate. That is also probably part of reason that they keep hiring tons of new positions for operation side.

Most of interviewers I spoke to look like they do understand in depth what they are doing. They are mostly 20s-early 30s. Genuinely nice and light-heart. I did enjoyed most of the conversation,and also had some good technical exchange/discussion with them.
however, there was only one guy with huge ego. I almost wanted to tell him"come on! you did not invent iPhone. just chill up..".

Questions are very details oriented, ranging from manufacturing process, tolerance stack up, process control, and also some soft skills question. Nothing too difficult if you have the experience you claimed on the resume. They wanted you to give examples, not just walking through general approach or concept.

Overall, i felt that if you are young, no family, no kids, love traveling, and have the talent Apple is looking for, the operations engineering might be a good fit for you. otherwise, be aware the huge workload is simply no comparison to any other jobs you may have done in the past.

Interview Question – describe how you fix or improve a manufacturing process with the supplier? how to handle supplier's push-back?   Answer Question

Reason for Declining – The pay is slightly higher, but considering the time you have invested, it would be a seriously under-pay.

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Accepted Offer

Neutral Experience

Average Interview

Senior Specialist Interview

Anonymous Employee
Cupertino, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 3 months - interviewed at Apple in March 2011.

Interview Details – I got a call from the recruiter. Had a phone interview and 6 interview in person

Interview Question – There wasn't a most most difficult or unexpected Question   Answer Question

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4 people found this helpful

Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Difficult Interview

Technical Program Manager Interview

Anonymous Employee
Cupertino, CA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 2 months - interviewed at Apple in February 2014.

Interview Details – Was contacted via email. Had a quick conference call with the recruiter and then a very technical interview with the hiring manager. About a week later I was invited for onsite; there were a total of 6 back-to-back interviews including a lunch interview and an impromptu one at the end. Being a technical position, most of the questions were in-depth, either related to my past experience or the role. I was fairly satisfied with how I did and was expecting a positive outcome. Still it took them some time to get back to me they had one more candidate to interview. Some advice for all aspirants:
* Be ready to explain why are you interested in this particular position and how your background makes you a great fit.
* Don't make stuff up. If you don't know something, admit it.
* If applying for a technical position, brush up on fundamentals. It helps!
* Research your interviewers and look up your notes before every interview so if you have the opportunity you can "surprise" them.
* Have lots and lots and lots of questions. Everybody asks if you have any and it's better to ask (even a repeat question) than to say I exhausted the list. Why do you like working here is a good one and gives different perspectives.

Interview Question – List all material properties that affect the frequency of a cantilever beam   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – The initial offer was a good one. I was able to negotiate a slightly higher base salary

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No Offer

Positive Experience

Difficult Interview

Finance Intern Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Cupertino, CA

I applied through college or university and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Apple in October 2012.

Interview Details – Submitted a resume through my college's job website. I got a call back and had a brief 15 minute phone interview about my goals, etc. Had a second Skype interview with a second year employee who began as an intern. We got along great as she went to the same school with me. I had a second Skype interview a few weeks later with a 4th year employee and stumbled. He was not very friendly and I was a little underprepared.

Interview Question – Gave me three job positions without descriptions and asked which I would like to do and why. Considering this would have been my first internship, I'm not sure how they wanted me to answer.   Answer Question

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Accepted Offer

Neutral Experience

Average Interview

Sales Consultant Interview

Anonymous Employee
Daly City, CA

I applied in-person and the process took 3 days - interviewed at Apple in January 2013.

Interview Details – Managers looking for people to work for cheap pay.

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1 person found this helpful

Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Family Room Specialist Interview

Anonymous Employee
Glendale, CA

I applied online and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Apple.

Interview Details – Applied internally within Apple as a Specialist.

Interviewed initially by floor manager in a 1-on-1 situation. Questions relate to ability to handle more complicated interactions. Manager will usually focus on previous areas of growth / concern to make sure you're up to the new challenges of the role.

After successful interview, second round was a group interview with store manager. During previous applications, a regional manager was sometimes present and active in presenting questions and listening to answers.

Questions will usually touch upon any recent policy changes, so ideally have an opinion upon those as well as suggestions for improvements where appropriate. Confidence is essential for FRS and Genius positions, don't be hesitant and be careful of your body language, as some managers place undue weight on it.

Interview Question – Talk about a time you were unable to meet a customer's expectations.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – No negotiation. They offer the position and state the compensation.

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Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Product Specialist Interview

Anonymous Employee
San Jose, CA

I applied online and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Apple in June 2013.

Interview Details – There are two rounds of hiring. The first is an overall group hiring process. The second is more intimate with only three others and the store managers and district leaders.

Interview Question – Give us an example when you changed someone's life through your work.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – Salary. Be able to speak to previous pay and negotiate like a pro.

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No Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Verification Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Cupertino, CA

I applied online - interviewed at Apple in April 2014.

Interview Details – For GPU team
Contacted by HR followed by two phone screens
first: manager
general questions from resume, experience, various verification environments, functional coverage, SV constraint solver
2nd: team member
uvm questions: TLM? Phases -> build is top down?
coverage ?
GPU pipe overview
How scoreboard implemented
UVM monitors
UVM TLM fifo's implementation
SV knowledge?

I did very good in both the interviews, but management chose to hire an internal candidate who has better experience

Interview Question – is run phase top down/bottom up   View Answer

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No Offer

Negative Experience

Easy Interview

GPU Build Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Cupertino, CA

I applied online and the process took 2+ weeks - interviewed at Apple.

Interview Details – Applied to a job posted on Linkedin. Recruiter asked for phone screen the very next day! Phone screen with hiring manager went very well...mostly general background question and was called in for an onsite interview. I freed up my whole week for Apple! But the onsite interview was cancelled and recruiter asked me details for the following week.

No worries. Anything for Apple! The onsite was setup a week after the first scheduled one. I was at Apple! The interview lasted for a few hours and 4 people interviewed me. it was not overly technical - nothing like write a script to do this or write code for this. It was mostly about branching strategies and other general SCM questions. I was very happy and very confident I will be called in for the second round.

In hindsight, there is a reason why the interview was so simple! They had made up their mind they were not going to hire me. After a few unreplied emails from recruiter, I finally called and she said that they have decided to hire an internal candidate.

Interview Question – Every single one asked this question - Why Apple?   Answer Question

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Glassdoor is your free inside look at Apple interview questions and advice in California. All 556 interview reviews posted anonymously by Apple employees and interview candidates.