Clearwater Analytics

  www.clearwateranalytics.com
  www.clearwateranalytics.com
Work in HR? Unlock Free Profile

Clearwater Analytics Software Engineer Interview Questions

Updated Apr 10, 2014
Updated Apr 10, 2014
5 Interview Reviews

Interview Experience

Interview Experience

50%
50%
0%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview

75%
25%

Interview Difficulty

3.2
Average

Interview Difficulty

Hard

Average

Easy

5 Candidate Interview Reviews Back to all interviews

Sort: Popular Date Difficulty

 

Software Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Boise, ID
Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boise, ID
Application Details

interviewed at Clearwater Analytics in March 2014.

Interview Details

I had 3 interviews with Clearwater. The first was a basic interview at my school. The second was an over the phone and over the web interview. The last was an interview on location. The first interview was very easy and involved solving 3 problems: reverse the digits in a number without string manipulation, fibonaccii or factorial question, and lastly was determing if a number is a heavy integer. In the second interview, I was asked to merge two sorted arrays and a question on creating an algorithm using specific objects (this one tested geometry and spacial skills). The third (onsite) interview was a test of algorithmic skills in greater detail.

Interview Questions
  • Design a system that can be used to store and validate thousands of different passwords from different users. Each user will have a different password validator and you must be able to store these and create new ones for each new user without having to compile the source code again.   Answer Question
No Offer
Positive Experience
Average Interview

Other Interview Reviews for Clearwater Analytics

  1.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied through college or university - interviewed at Clearwater Analytics.

    Interview Details

    Had an on campus interview where I was asked to solve mathematical problems -
    Given a cube 10x10 with subcubes of 1x1, find the number of cubes in the edge of the big cube.
    Asked to write a code for reversing a number.

    Was called onsite and had 5 rounds.
    ROund 1 was mathematical.
    Round 2 was object oriented
    Round 3 was about my research work
    Round 4 was coding
    and round 5 was with the VP

    Interview Questions
    No Offer
  2.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Boise, ID
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boise, ID
    Application Details

    I applied through college or university. The process took 3 weeks - interviewed at Clearwater Analytics in October 2011.

    Interview Details

    Clearwater came to my university for a career fair and took my resume. Later that day they called and wanted to interview me the next day on campus. I had interviewed with them the previous year for an intern position, so I kind of knew what to expect. Ironically enough, the same guy interviewed me again and asked me a couple of the same questions. He didn't seem to remember interviewing me the year before.

    That first interview lasted about 45 minutes and consisted solely of technical or logic questions, he didn't mention anything on my resume. The first thing he did was hand me a piece of paper with Java code on it and told me to find all the errors I could. He pulled out a stopwatch and timed me for it, too. It has been a while since I've done anything in Java, and I let him know this, so I just picked out what I thought were errors. He didn't tell me if I had missed anything.
    The next question was a math problem involving a system of equations. He asked me this exact question almost word for word last year and I had struggled with it. I remembered it this time and answered it after setting up the equations correctly.
    He then asked me to write some code on paper to do something I don't remember. I remember it wasn't too difficult, but he was concerned with some of the edge cases and run-time of the function.

    About a week and a half later I got an e-mail from them saying that they wanted me to come on-site to Boise for more interviews. I figured I would take the opportunity to find out more about what it would be like to work there.

    I only lived a couple of hours from Boise, so I opted to drive and they would reimburse me for gas, food, etc. I drove to Boise about a week and a half later and they put me up in a snazzy chic hotel in downtown Boise that was just around the corner from their offices. I got in late so I didn't spend much time checking out the city. My interviews started the next day at 9 am. I had three interviews in the morning each about 45 minutes long, then they took me to lunch and had one last interview in the afternoon.

    They gave me a quick tour of the office before my interviews started. Their development team is on one floor of a building in downtown. All around their office they have parts of the Agile Manifesto written on the walls, since they're such an Agile company, I guess. The atmosphere is pretty casual with most of the guys in jeans and tshirts. The only female there was the receptionist that was showing me around. Their office is divided up into teams of about 6 or 8 and each team has two large rooms for their use. One of those rooms has everyone's small workstation set up, no walls or cubicles to divide the developers from each other. The other room for each team consists of white boards on all the walls where they hold their team meetings (but without chairs or desks). Then they have a large conference room called the Colosseum where they hold meetings for the entire development team, I guess.

    Each of the on-site interviews were conducted by pairs of developers. Each pair was given a specific set of things to ask about like "math, logic and SQL" or "object-oriented design" or "algorithms" or "presentation". Each interview (except the presentation) was focused entirely on white-board programming and problem solving. They give you a problem or ask you to write a function or class and you do it on the white board.

    The questions weren't terribly difficult. I didn't have any SQL experience, so they didn't ask me the question they had planned for that. Also, I'm not great at OO design, so I struggled a little bit through those questions. One of the OO questions was to design a class to model AND and OR gates in a circuit. The other was an intentionally vague question about how to model roads and vehicles with classes. Neither of those went too well.

    Most of the questions had been ones I had seen on this site. It seems that they have a small pool of questions they use for every interview.

    I was able to ask a couple of questions about what it was like working there. They said it's a really good work/life balance. Basically you put in your hours from 9 to 5 and then go home and forget about the job. They said it's very rare to put in more than 40 hours a week. All of their development from what I understood is done in Java and they are currently working on making their products more scalable. I think they were looking for someone with more database and object-oriented experience.

    I found out just a couple days after that they were going to look for another candidate for the job.

    Interview Questions
    • I have some cars. You have some cars. If I give you one of my cars, we'll have the same number of cars. If you give me one of your cars, I'll have twice as many cars as you. How many cars do we each have?   View Answer
    • Given a cube made up of n x n x n smaller cubes, write a function that finds the number of smaller cubes with at least one face showing.   View Answer
    • I like to bike into the mountains on my lunch break. I only have 1 hour to do so, though. If I can bike uphill at 20 km/hr and downhill at 30 km/hr, how far can I go or how long can I ride before I have to turn around to make it back in exactly an hour?   View Answer
    • Given a binary search tree, write a function that displays the nodes at each level in order.   View Answer
    • Given an unsorted array of n numbers and some number sum, write a function that checks if there are two numbers in the array that add up to the given sum.   View Answer
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  3.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Boise, ID
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boise, ID
    Application Details

    I applied through college or university. The process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Clearwater Analytics in June 2011.

    Interview Details

    First I got an email asking me to take a one-hour test on Google Docs. The questions included algebra (more the kind you can reason about than the kind that requires that you took a relevant class), logic, object-oriented programming, and database topics.

    I felt I did well, and got an for a phone interview. It was mostly true false and multiple choice. The questions were again about logic, C++, Java, and databases. The interviewer said it was okay that I didn't have any databases experience, and to just guess for those questions.

    After I passed that interview, they did a one-hour collabEdit coding phone interview.

    I was asked to reverse a number (like 1284 to 4821) without resorting to string manipulation. I don't think I did very well. After a half hour of me struggling with that, he asked me how what he thought was an easy question: how to find the nearest common ancestor for two nodes in a binary tree.

    After I solved that with his help, he asked me what motivated me to work in computer science.

    Interview Questions
    • How do reverse a number (like 1284 to 4821) without resorting to string manipulation?   Answer Question
    • Write an algorithm to find the most recent common ancestor of two nodes in a binary search tree.   Answer Question
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview
  4. We want your feedback – Is this interview information helpful to you?  Yes | No
  5.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Clearwater Analytics in October 2010.

    Interview Details

    I spoke with them during career fair, where they offered to interview me the next day. First interview was mainly technical questions. Recruiters were friendly and approachable.

    The interview process proceeded with a phone interview, in which you write code, and they monitor what you write.

    Interview Questions
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

Worked for Clearwater Analytics? Contribute to the Community!

The difficulty rating is the average interview difficulty rating across all interview candidates.

The interview experience is the percentage of all interview candidates that said their interview experience was positive, neutral, or negative.

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.