Education Advisory Board

www.educationadvisoryboard.com
Unclaimed Profile

Education Advisory Board Interview Questions

Updated Aug 15, 2015
15 Interview Reviews

Interview Experience

Interview Experience

25%
58%
16%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview

64%
35%

Interview Difficulty

3.2
Average

Interview Difficulty

Hard

Average

Easy

Candidate Interview Reviews

Sort: Popular Date Difficulty
  1.  

    Analyst Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board in July 2015.

    Interview

    I applied through an employee referral and was contacted within a week to schedule an introductory interview. This interview took place over the phone and lasted about half an hour. The interview was fairly standard. The recruiter asked me about my resume and other behavioral questions. Within a week I was contacted to schedule a case interview. The first half of the case interview was nearly identical to the previous interview. The interviewer left about 10-15 minutes for the case. The recruiter presented a prompt and I was asked to discuss what I might consider in evaluating the business decision. The case was whether or not the Bronx Zoo should purchase a hypothetical dinosaur. While I understand the rationale behind presenting such a bizarre case, it still doesn't seem like an ideal tool in evaluating a potential researcher. It was somewhat difficult to take seriously. Immediately following the case interview I was sent a writing prompt relevant to the position for which I was applying. I had exactly 90 minutes to respond, which I found reasonable but a bit tight. The prompt tests your critical thinking skills but not your ability to research . Another company that produces similar research on higher education gives you a prompt and a week to complete a report based on information you are able to collect. This seems a bit more telling of an employee's skills. I was contacted within a week with news that they would not be passing my application through to the next round. Overall the experience was a neutral one. I would have been happy to work for this company and would still recommend others to apply.

    Interview Questions

    • Give me an example of a time when you received constructive criticism and how you used it.   Answer Question
  2.  

    Associate Director Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board (Washington, DC) in June 2015.

    Interview

    Like many of the other contributors, I got an interview by sending my resume through a friend who used to work at the company. It was a very extensive interview process: a phone interview, a personality test, a Skype interview, and a 3-hour in person interview and presentation. The final portion included learning a 90-minute presentation with slides and script provided. I was scheduled and rescheduled several times because of travel conflicts which was felt a bit like a test of flexibility, which was hard to manage with a full-time job at a different company.

    Interview Questions

    • The interviewer asked me to convince him of something-- anything-- and then, when I finished answering, he asked me to convince him of the opposite side of the argument.   Answer Question
  3. Helpful (2)  

    Practice Manager Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took a week. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board in March 2015.

    Interview

    Within days following an employee referral, someone contacted me to schedule a phone interview. It was a 30-minute phone interview, and I did most of the talking. There was very little engagement on the part of the interviewer except to invite me to respond to three very simple prompts: "Tell me about yourself and why you want to work here," "Describe a research project," and "Describe your management experience." The interviewer had worked at the company for some time in different roles. She introduced herself at the beginning and explained she mostly did recruiting for research positions now. She was very friendly but did almost no talking after that opening introduction and the prompts. No follow-up questions and no response when I asked at several different points during the interview if she needed more details or clarification or had any follow-up questions. I've never had an interview, even a phone interview, quite like this before. I felt like I was talking to a wall through most of it. No chemistry, positive or negative. Just a wall of silence. The questions weren't difficult, but it was impossible to gauge her reaction to what I was saying. Maybe that was the point? That this was supposed to be less a conversation and more a sales pitch? I had prepared in advance but was prepared for a conversation. In retrospect, I think I should have prepared for a PowerPoint presentation, imagining my resume as the slides and assuming no interaction with the "audience." I also think I should have done more to flatter the company in my "why do you want to work here" response. I talked about what I could offer them, but when I finished, the interviewer said, "okaaay," before moving on to the next prompt in a tone that made me think I'd missed the mark. It was the only voice clue I had. In a nutshell, I went into the interview with a very favorable impression of the company but ended it with a much less favorable one, even though the interviewer seemed like a nice enough person from her brief introduction. As a mid-career professional, I expect an interview, even a phone screening, to be a two-way exchange. And that means more than just the standard interview conclusion: "Do you have any questions for me?" Just as the company needs to figure out if a candidate is the right fit for the company, the candidate needs to figure out if the company is the right fit for them. And, speaking personally, I can't do that if I'm talking to a wall. So, I guess it's good no one wasted any more of anyone's time.

    Interview Questions

    • Tell me about yourself and why you want to work here. Describe a research project. Describe your management experience.   Answer Question
  4. Is this helpful? The community relies on everyone sharing – Add Anonymous Interview Review


  5.  

    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board in March 2015.

    Interview

    Applied via an employee referral, was contacted within about two weeks to set up a phone interview. Had about a 30 minute call with a recruiting specialist, mostly focused on why I wanted to work there, why I was interested in higher education, and what my research experience was. She told me that this position would involve managing a team, but didn't ask me anything about my management experience, just my research. That struck me as odd. She told me she was going to meet with the EAB folks at the end of the following week and then I'd hear via email whether I was moving on.

    Interview Questions

    • Why are you interested in higher education?   Answer Question
    • Walk me through a research project you worked on, how you scoped it, etc.   Answer Question
  6. Helpful (3)  

    Research Associate Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board.

    Interview

    I applied online and after a month or so was contacted for a phone interview. Was pretty standard and the hiring manager seemed genuinely interested in my research experience. After a couple of business days I was contacted for an onsite interview. At the DC office, I met with 2 sets of research managers and each interview included standard behavioral questions and a case. The case was not that hard but definitely practice and be comfortable defending your rationale. Everyone I met with was very pleasant and all-in-all it was a positive experience.

    Interview Questions

  7. Helpful (4)  

    Analyst Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board (Washington, DC).

    Interview

    I had been trying to apply for jobs at ABC for about a year on their website. I applied 3 times, spending a total of 6 hours tailoring resumes and cover letters for entry-level research positions, paying $35k-$40k (I was only a year out of school with three internships). I never heard a response. Then, someone close to me who used to work at ABC sent in my resume to HR internally and said, "Here, I think this guy would be good at your company." Next thing I know, I get called up for an interview. HR chose to submit me for consideration for an Analyst position at EAB, paying $50-72k a year. (I read the job description and found myself very confused; I was unqualified for it nor did I understand it. Also, I was more experienced in healthcare than in education). That leads to my first point. If they thought I might be worth $50-72k, then they certainly wouldn't have ignored me for lower level positions. It seems like applying on the website is useless; networking is key. Next came a phone interview, it was easy, basic stuff. It was odd that they asked me, "Why do you think you're good for this position," especially when I didn't select the position. Then came an Excel test. I'm great at Excel, so it was a breeze. I had one hour to make a few spreadsheets. After that, they called me immediately, seeming to be very excited and eager to interview me [i'd give the specifics as to how I knew they were very interested in me, but it would reveal my identity]. They scheduled me for a 3 round interview over 4 hours. There was a case study question with the first one, and the second two were just talking with my team, talking about my experience and what we'd be working on. My interviews went okay, good, and excellent, but it was grueling. At the end of it, the Director told me twice, "Well, we'll see you soon!" Well, that was misleading. After the month-long process, I was told I didn't get the job. I asked to be considered for other ones, and got no reply. Dropped like a ton of bricks. It was a bit devastating. A recent grad getting considered for a mid-level job? It was a bad idea in the first place. My experience tells tales about their HR system and their corporate culture. I don't think I'll apply there again.

  8. Helpful (1)  

    Research Analyst Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board in October 2014.

    Interview

    A current employee submitted my resume and I got contacted for a 1st round phone interview after just two days. We set it up for the next week. The recruiter called on time, the interview lasted for around 25 minutes and she was very nice and responsive to what I said. At the end she told me she would be talking to the hiring team right after she got off the phone with me to choose candidates for an on-site interview, but would let me know either way. I got an email a week later that they didn't have a position for me.

    Interview Questions

    • Basic questions and then some tailored to research: Why did you choose your college/major; what is your writing style and how has it changed; tell me about the last research you did (with specifics), why are you interested in our company, etc   Answer Question
  9. Helpful (3)  

    Research Associate Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ months. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board (Washington, DC) in February 2014.

    Interview

    The recruiters I worked with were very helpful, thorough, and seemed genuinely eager to answer my questions. I applied in November, and with the Holidays, the process seemed to drag on: I had a phone screen with a recruiter, a phone interview with a Senior Research Manager, and was ultimately invited to interview at the Washington DC offices. Everyone was friendly, and the interviews themselves weren't difficult, but the case studies required lots of thinking on your feet - I would definitely encourage applicants to do your homework on types of cases EAB often deals with. They require a writing test for this position, which I completed remotely; but be prepared to do the test after the interviews, pretty sure my case was an exception. Overall the process was decent, but it took a full month for EAB to get back to me after my final interviews, only to tell me I wasn't offered the job...HR needs to pick up the pace if they want to maintain their professional image.

    Interview Questions

    • Relating to Responsibility Centered Management (RCM) Budget proposal by a University vs. a Standard Budgeting model - would have been a bit in the dark had I not researched RCM ahead of time.   Answer Question
  10.  

    Research Consultant, Higher Education Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    No Offer
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board (Washington, DC) in February 2014.

    Interview

    I engaged in a 30 minute phone interview. I was really only asked one question, "Explain to me your resume." There was one or two very general questions asked after that which I do not recall but these were not very substantive. The only real question I was asked was to explain my resume.

    Interview Questions

    • Again, during the phone interview, I was asked to walk the interviewer through my resume. There were no detailed or specific questions. I had expected these to follow, but that was it- "tell me about your resume."   Answer Question
  11.  

    Research Associate Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Education Advisory Board (Washington, DC) in February 2014.

    Interview

    First round phone interview followed by in-office interview with two case studies and one written test. The phone interview was very general: asking questions about what I value in a work environment, what I value in research, how I believe I have evolved as a writer, what would I have changed about my undergraduate institution, etc.

    Interview Questions

Don't Miss Out On a Job You Love
Upload a resume to easily apply to jobs from anywhere. It's simple to set up.

The difficulty rating is the average interview difficulty rating across all interview candidates.

The interview experience is the percentage of all interview candidates that said their interview experience was positive, neutral, or negative.

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.