Facebook Technology Partner Interview Questions

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Technology Partner Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Menlo Park, CA
Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
Application Details

I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3 weeks - interviewed at Facebook in January 2013.

Interview Details

Was contacted by a recruiter for an Internal Tools Engineer position. During initial phone screen, the possibility of applying instead for the Technology Partner role was presented (based on my diverse background as a founder/PM and application developer). After thinking it through for a couple of days, I opted to proceed with the Technology Partner interview.

My first phone interview (45 min.) was with the hiring manager. I was asked a broad range of questions, from the expected ("Why Facebook?") to the very specific (questions about using data to inform product decisions at my prior companies). There were a handful of process questions--fairly standard product management type stuff.

After the initial phone interview, I was contacted by the recruiter to setup a phone interview with the hiring manager's boss. This interview was similar in format to the prior phone interview, and the same types of questions were asked. I could sense that they were looking for specific data points on prior product decisions, so having a handful of "for instance" answers proved very helpful. At the end of this call, I was told that the recruiter would be arranging my travel details for an on-site interview.

The onsite interview process was fairly straightforward. Facebook is awesome about scheduling travel for out of town applicants, and the arrangements were made without a hitch. The on-site interview consisted of six 45min. interviews as well as lunch with the recruiter.

While I can't provide specific questions, make sure you brush up on your SQL! For this position, there was one basic engineering interview (which I found to be very enjoyable, having to do with the style of the particular engineering manager, and the types of questions asked). In addition to the engineer, I interviewed with two Technology Partners, the hiring manager, the hiring manager's boss, and an analyst.

I was very comfortable with the questions asked, other than a brief stumble on a SQL question. I enjoyed the personalities of everyone I interviewed with, and everyone was punctual and very reassuring.

I emailed the recruiter a week after the onsite interview, and was promptly phoned. They opted to pass on making an offer. The recruiter was very gracious, and indicated that all the feedback from the interviewing group was positive, and they'd like to keep me in consideration for other positions in the future.

Interview Questions
  • While I can't go into specifics due to Facebook's NDA interview policy, I will say that very practical experience will help you in navigating these interviews. Answering in general will only lead to more specific questions.   Answer Question
No Offer
Average Interview

Other Interview Reviews for Facebook

  1. 5 people found this helpful  

    Technology Partner Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Menlo Park, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter - interviewed at Facebook.

    Interview Details

    I was contacted by a Facebook Recruiter to discuss this position. I have over 12 years of experience while the position expected someone with just 4+ years of experience. This made me wonder if it was too junior a position for me. But the recruiter explained that at Facebook most employees with 4+ years of experience are expected to be able to do this job. It's not that the position is of a junior level; it's just the caliber of people expected at Facebook. This, both, impressed and intimidated me.

    After the initial chat with the recruiter, I had a 45-minute interview with the Hiring Manager. Although he was poker-faced throughout the interview, he was warm and never made me feel uncomfortable. He went to great lengths to explain the role, it's position within the company and the culture of FB. I came away wanting to work there even more!

    When I didn't hear back from the recruiter for about 2 days after the interview (I'm impatient!), I emailed her requesting a feedback. She immediately called me back and said that they were working on trying to bring me back for more detailed interviews with the team. And within a couple of days they scheduled another on-site for me. This time I was to be interviewed by the Hiring Manager again, his boss and 3 of his direct reports who would be peers of the position that I was interviewing for. The interview would last for almost 4 hrs of 45minutes with each interviewer.

    I was surprised to be interviewed by the Hiring Manager again but I soon realized that my initial chat with him had been just that - an informal chat. This time around he grilled me in detail about the various projects I had managed in the past. He made me draw a process flow of the Business area that I would be supporting and asked detailed questions of every aspect; he didn't miss a thing. The same pattern followed with the other interviewers too. They came prepared with specific questions about my work experience and as I answered them I realized that they were able to extract from me all the information they needed to learn about my working history and experience in a very precise manner.

    Looking back at the interview, those 4hrs at Facebook were quite grueling and taxing for my mind because I hadn't had such an intense interview in years. I had never had to draw process flows or explain SQL statements or present a graphic outline of the various systems within my business area before. However, I now realize that they probably have a very good idea of what I know and especially, what I don't know. Throughout the interviews all of them said the same thing to me - do not worry; there is no right answer; it's okay if you don't know.

    As for me, I learnt a lot about the culture at Facebook and what this position would require of me if they offered me the position. I learnt that they expect things to move along at a fairly quick pace without any bureaucratic culture. They don't expect you to succeed in every venture you take up and would never punish you for occasional failures that are bound to happen. They just want enthusiastic, intelligent and passionate people to work with.

    Each and every interviewer at Facebook came across as super-smart and passionate about their jobs. 3 out of the 5 told me that they cannot imagine working anywhere else now. I came away knowing that not only will this be a challenging place to work but it will also be an opportunity to work with some really smart people who completely enjoy what they are doing.

    I haven't received any feedback from FB yet but no matter which way this goes, I feel super happy about having had the opportunity to interview there and get a glimpse of its working.

    Interview Questions
    • I was asked to explain how I would measure the success of a project in a quantifying manner and that was something I didn't expect and couldn't answer successfully. They are big on running ROIs for projects and proving, with numbers, how much a system implementation has improved the efficiency of the business process. Since I have never done anything like this before, it was difficult for me to propose a proper method.   Answer Question
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview
  2. 5 people found this helpful  

    Technology Partner Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  Menlo Park, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    Application Details

    The process took 5+ weeks - interviewed at Facebook in April 2012.

    Interview Details

    Disclaimer: One of the interviewers was my internal reference as well. All titles are paraphrased/alternatives

    1. Initial discussion with hiring manager to gauge level of interest on both sides
    2. Recruiter Phone Screen
    3. Peer Technical Phone Screen (because position applied for was different from position interviewed)
    4. On-site interviews
    4.1 Recruiter intro/level-set
    4.2 Divisional Head interview
    4.3 Lunch interview with hiring manager
    4.4 Sub-divisional Head interview 1
    4.5 Sub-divisional Head interview 2
    4.6 C-level interview (no, not Zuckerberg, but close enough :-) )
    4.7 Hiring Manager interview #2 (because lunch was truncated for other reasons)

    Almost 4 weeks to the dot for response. Feedback was very positive, but not a clear fit for position (I agree too).

    I have over 15 years of experience working for about 10 different companies, but this interview experience will stand out in memory for a long, long time. Not a single dud interview. Each interviewer was unmistakably intelligent. Interview topics were completely free-flowing - one interview was mostly a debate on the Civil War :-) Interviewing styles were markedly different, but each interviewer knew exactly what they were looking for and most were able to get the information they wanted by making you talk about what you've done in the past, rather than just ask academic questions.

    Technical questions were easy, but this was for a position in Ops, so clearly not as technical as engineering interviews. Jargon in resume was deeply challenged by some interviewers. Everyone was very respectful, friendly, open, and most importantly, seemed interested in what I had to say (some were open to broad discussions, others wanted more concise answers).

    Only suggestion to candidates would be, shed all facades and appearances and go as yourself. I had so much fun that I wanted to interview some more! I can see how some might find the interviews daunting and the interviewers intimidating, but if you're comfortable with who you are, you'll meet some very interesting people who are deeply, deeply passionate and have an integrated outlook toward work, life and fun.

    Negatives: They're going through some logistical challenges in the new offices, though hardly anything out of the ordinary. Depending on who you interview with, the recruiting team may find it hard to assimilate feedback in a timely manner. Somewhat cultish adherence to principles/ideology/Zuck - practically each interviewer apologized for sounding like they'd drunk the kool-aid :) They don't yet realize that they're getting too busy for their actions to always match their words. I'm sure so far they've meant everything they said, but as they get bigger and busier, they should be a little cautious about setting expectations, particularly w.r.t time and responsiveness.

    Bottom-line: Truly passionate, honest, intelligent, focused workforce, but individual personalities seemed subservient to the spirit of the company. They'll get the cream of the crop, but easy to understand why some exceptionally individualistic people may turn them down without second thought.

    Interview Questions
    • What do you mean by you did <industry jargon on resume>? How did you do it? We need it, but don't know how we would do it.   View Answer
    • What would you do on day 1 here?   View Answer
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

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