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Glassdoor Senior Web Developer Interview Questions

Updated Nov 8, 2014
Updated Nov 8, 2014
4 Interview Reviews

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6 people found this helpful  

Senior Web Developer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Anonymous Interview Candidate
Interview Details

The process kicked off with an e-mail asking to set up a technical phone screen. I was extremely excited to speak with Glassdoor as they were one of my top companies I was pursuing.

The phone call was scheduled for mid day. I received the call nearly 40 minutes past the time we agreed on (I had given up on the phone call by that point). The interview was off to a rough start.

We spoke about my background for 10 minutes and then dove right into the technical part. What I wasn't prepared for was what was to come next. I've had many technical interviews on the past. I enjoy them. I look forward to them because it's an engineer's time to shine.

For the next 35 minutes straight I was bombarded with question after question about the most intricate parts of css and html. Things like list out every possible unit of measure in css. List out every single html5 bracket. Define for me semantic html.

For 35 minutes straight and without a second gap in between I was bombarded. By the end of the interview I was so off balance from what had just happened. I could hear she wasn't pleased on the phone. I apologized for being a bit frazzled and reiterated my excitement for the opportunity at Glassdoor.

I hung up the phone and took a minute to think about what had just happened and realized... I just spent 45 minutes talking to this woman and she literally has no idea whether or not I can code. What I was quizzed on was my ability to regurgitate information from MDN. If this woman has been allowed to head up the interview process for any significant time I can't even imagine how many talented engineers have been screened out of the interview funnel because they don't remember that a pica is a unit of measurement in CSS.

Having not heard anything for a week after the phone screen I didn't have high hopes but I still sent an extremely enthusiastic e-mail thanking this woman for her time and explaining that I was beyond excited about the position. I also apologized for being caught a little off guard with a few of the questions as I prepped for a different interpretation of the job.

I received a canned e-mail about 3 minutes after my e-mail was sent rejecting me.

I cannot even express in words how put off I was by this process.

Interview Questions
No Offer
Negative Experience
Difficult Interview

Other Interview Reviews for Glassdoor

  1.  

    Senior Web Developer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Interview Details

    Any time that you have a five hour interview with no break, and an interviewer drops an f-bomb in an interview, it's bad times. Some of the questions weren't on-target, either, but rather asked me to code something that I wouldn't ever do in real life. Didn't feel like working there would do anything for me personally or my career.

    Reasons for Declining

    I declined before I got an offer. I couldn't see myself working there.

    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    Senior Web Developer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Sausalito, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Sausalito, CA
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took a weekinterviewed at Glassdoor in January 2013.

    Interview Details

    After initial email, a phone interview was setup for Friday. Phone interview consisted of a mix of CSS questions (list all the possible values for position property, and how they each work esp. in context of the container ) and general Javascript questions (scope rules, event delegation etc.) along with standard expectations interests etc. Follow up interview was setup from 12 - 6 the following Wed. with 5 different people. Mostly engineers and the CTO. Everyone was friendly, engaging and knowledgable.

    Interview Questions
    • Estimate the number of dentists in the US; explain your assumptions, and if you think your answer is reasonable. Mostly an assessment in your approach to problem solving without having to remember various technical details.   View Answer
    • A page uses 2 js files. Script1.js has a login function in a pop-up, script2.js contains event handlers for certain clicks on a page. If the user is logged in, the click event is processed in script2.js. If they aren't they get the pop up from script1.js and if/when they login in, whatever they clicked goes thru in script2.js. How do you do this?   View Answer
    • Give a general overview of how you would increase performance of a particular page. The page contains several buttons in it with a bunch of associated event handlers with a bunch more javascript etc.   View Answer
    • Given 2 arrays that are already sorted, write a quick function that combines both arrays and returns a single sorted array.   View Answers (2)
    • Write your own script that does a JSONP request, without using jQuery. Should work with multiple calls to the function and support async.   View Answer
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  3. 2 people found this helpful  

    Senior Web Developer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Sausalito, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Sausalito, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 1+ weekinterviewed at Glassdoor in September 2007.

    Interview Details

    I was a little nervous going into this interview, as I'd not worked for a company formally for almost two years. I had kept coding, but the technology moves so quickly that I worried that I had been left behind. As I had started my last two companies, it had been well over a decade since I'd last interviewed!

    My recruiter set up an interview with a new company in my home town of Sausalito. It was small and very under-the-radar. They weren't even revealing their product. The company was just getting started and was still going by the code name of 'Jagundi'. The process was very informal. After a short (20 minute) phone screening, I was asked to come in to meet with the principles. They were also in the process of moving from San Rafael into new offices in Sausalito.

    Ryan, the VP of Engineering met me and led me into the conference room where we chatted for a while. He asked me some basic questions about the breath of my HTML & JSP experience, my experience with CSS, and what I was looking for in a position. He asked me some hypothetical questions about how I would solve problems, mostly involving situations from the travel industry.

    Next I spoke with Tim, the VP of Marketing, who was very high energy and asked me how I would go about solving a few problems (again, from the travel industry.) He asked, for example, how I would go about implementing an availability management system for hotel rooms. He also asked how I would go about identifying new hotels with which we could partner if we wanted to grow a company providing travel services. (Though I know very little about the travel industry, Tim seemed happy with my responses, and to be honest, spent most of the time talking himself. (Like I said, he is very high energy.)

    I guess I was doing pretty well, because I next went into the CEO's office. Bob was much more casual than I had been expecting, and we had a very relaxed talk about coding, passion, and what I was looking for. He asked me to solve a fairly interesting hypothetical (see question below), and then left the office for a few minutes while I thought about it.

    When he came back, he said that they liked me enough to tell me what the company was going to be doing. He described the Glassdoor concept, talked about making the world a better place through transparency and honesty, and talked about how big he thought that this was going to be. Then he sent me away to think about it.

    I remember two things from my talk with Bob. First, that he was a great, charismatic spokesman who could really sell the concept. From my previous experience with three start-ups, I knew how important that was. Second, that this was a really interesting idea. Even better, it was *different*. Jagundi/Glassdoor wasn't just doing another me-too product, or even a lets-get-rich-quick product. I believed Bob really wanted to make the world a better place.

    And whether he did or not, he sold me.

    Interview Questions
    • Google Maps allows you to zoom in and out of satellite maps, with terabytes of data accessible via a very fast interface. How would you go about implementing this functionality?   View Answer
    Negotiation Details
    I was in the tall grass when it came to negotiation. During the interview, Bob asked me what I was looking to make. My recruiter had told me not to mention numbers, but it was hard to avoid that when asked point-blank. Feeling like I had the hugest stones in the world, I asked for $90k. Then I went home and did some research, where I learned that 90k was not that much these days for a person with my skills.

    The day after my Glassdoor interview, I also interviewed with Restoration Hardware. I was very apparent to me that I was just as skilled as their web staff, and that they were willing to pay a lot for a good coder. They made me an offer on the spot, for $110k. So now I had an offer from Resto Hardware, and what looked like another offer from Glassdoor on its way. Wow, not bad for my first two interviews.

    Bob Hohman called me and made me an offer of what I had asked for, $90k. I told him that I had looked at some salary surveys and realized that I should be asking for at least $100k. There was a pause. Then Bob laughed and said "Well, I guess this is what we're looking to accomplish!" He raised his offer to $100k.

    The only other negotiation detail was equity. I'd been through enough start-ups to realize that this is much more important than salary, but so did Bob. I was looking for 1%, and he offered me a *lot* less than I wanted. We went back and forth a little. Because I really wanted to work for Glassdoor, I settle for a lot less equity than I wanted, and it's probably the only thing I regret about the negotiation.
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

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