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Health Watch Interview Questions

2 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Territory Associate Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Framingham, MA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Framingham, MA
    Application Details

    The process took a dayinterviewed at Health Watch in September 2009.

    Interview Details

    Sat down, answered generic interview questions, said I could start Monday (interviewed on Friday), was offered the job.

    Interview Questions
    Negotiation Details
    nothing.
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview
  2. 2 people found this helpful  

    Operations Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeksinterviewed at Health Watch in March 2010.

    Interview Details

    I was surprised to find the position online. At first glance, it seemed to be a match for my skill set and a position that would challenge me versus lowering my IQ. I wasn't the "perfect match", but I had enough relevant experience to make my case and do the job if hired.

    An HR rep called a week after sending in my credentials for a phone interview. The interview was barely over 20 minutes long and was much more of a screening than an interview. After the conversation, I really wasn't convinced my candidacy would go further. I'm called the next day to schedule an in-person interview. I was impressed with the HR rep's follow-up.

    The building was a very modern, clean, crisply decorated; very business-like but inviting. In about five minutes, the HR rep approached. She was very genial, but not that overly, fake nice that some HR professionals can be. I was told I would be taking a skills test for Excel and Access plus a personality test. I was seated in front of a standard desktop workstation and shown how to access the tests. The HR rep informed me that the supervisor I would be seeing is in the sister building about 1,500 feet around the corner.

    This building was more ornately decorated than the other. It seemed to straddle the line of "high end business" and "cookie-cutter cubicle environment." The male receptionist at the desk greeted me with an excess of high-energy and enthusiasm. It came across as more of a show, sales pitch warm-up, than a genuine welcome. Few people strolled past and soon the supervisor appeared escorting me upstairs to a conference room.

    The supervisor seemed nice, down-to-earth, and interested in me. He has a good sense of humor, asked very good questions, and was open to my questions. The supervisor, who I find out after asking him point-blank, has only been with the company for half a year which I found odd. The interview was wrapped up in an hour. I am told that from here, I should hear back "soon" from HR about scheduling an interview with the manager. He also mentioned that I might have to interview with the director as well.

    I thought that was interesting because based on my previous position, why would a director care who I am considering I am two levels below. Between the HR tests and two interviews, I wasn't sure why meeting with the director is on the radar, so I ask. Allegedly the position has been open for "quite a few months", trying to find the "right candidate." I mused, "Double digit unemployment stats reign , yet you can't find the 'right candidate?'"

    The next morning the HR rep calls looking to bring me in to meet with the manager which we scheduled. I return to the original building, sign-in, and take a seat. I waited close to fifteen minutes before the manager comes to get me. The manager appears and she comes across as cold. Everything she says feels as if it's forced. Leading me silently through a maze of corridors and into a large conference room, she loosely apologizes for being late. She sits herself down in a chair and her demeanor is that one of "let's get this over with already."

    Sitting with her head propped on her right hand, mustering up questions to ask me, clearly she's reading my resume for the first time as she's asking questions that are in my resume. I'm not impressed with her attitude, lack of preparation, and her manners. As I'm explaining something to her that she wanted clarification on, I watch her pick up her Blackberry and start typing away. This happened quite a few times in the course of the hour-long interview. She also produced some snacks and started eating in front of me. She only apologized, explaining she did not have lunch, because her actions registered surprise on my face.

    The way she asks me to explain common words carried an undercurrent of, "You are not smart enough to use such words." If she wasn't doing that, she was cutting me demanding to "answer the question." I gave about ten seconds of background info so she should see how in my former role we came to the same outcome as you would in this company. She wants to hear what she wants to hear; nothing more.

    I ask her questions, the same set I asked the supervisor. She faltered on most demonstrating a lack of knowledge. The interview ends, I'm hustled me out to the front and she quickly vanished after "thanking" me for coming in. I left the building convinced I did not get the position and expect a form letter this coming week confirming it.

    It took one experience to dissuade me from accepting an offer had one been issued. I would not want to work for such a manager and telling as to why the position has been allegedly open for so long. The company is vast and there are so many different departments, so your experience may vary. In this case, it was a hybrid of good and bad, but unfortunately the second interview moved the experience rating out of neutral to negative.

    Interview Questions
    • How would you define the word "optimized?"   View Answer
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

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