Intel Corporation Senior Process Engineer Interview Questions

Updated Aug 17, 2015
40 Interview Reviews

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Senior Process Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Declined Offer
Positive Experience
Difficult Interview

Application

I applied through an employee referral. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Intel Corporation in May 2007.

Interview

Intel has a standard questions booklet they select questions from to test your individual apptitude and personality. They will also ask you to give several examples of situaitons you've been in that were confrontational, difficult, challenging, etc. It is helpful to have such examples prepared beforehand. I was also asked a very difficult technical question that involved semiconductor processing, but few of the other candidates reported questions as complicated as mine.

Interview Questions

  • Can you think of an example of where you had to deal with a supervisor or superior was resistant to accept your opinion or any changes you suggested?   Answer Question

Other Interview Reviews for Intel Corporation

  1.  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Hillsboro, OR
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 days. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Hillsboro, OR) in March 2013.

    Interview

    First, got one phone interview for an engineering position with group No. 1. This one was very basic and informal, and most of the time was spent chatting about the company itself, my previous experience, and the details of the job. Second interview was on-site with group No. 2. After the phone interview they had apparently passed my resume on to a different group, but it wasn't exactly clear. The interview lasted for a full day and consisted of nine back-to-back interviews in the cafeteria, with a break for lunch off-site. I had to be escorted everywhere, even to get a coffee or to go to the bathroom, and saw virtually nothing of the company except the cafeteria and a conference room. They couldn't even tell me what I would be working on, beyond the most general or basic of terms. At the end of the day I was expected to give an hour long presentation on my PhD research. Exhausting. Most questions were technical, like "can you describe how XYZ works," but there were also a few questions like "if you had a problem with a co-worker, what would you do?" Portland is great, the pay would be good, but I was not impressed with the job itself. These people are expected to put in 60 to 80 hours a week, possibly more if needed, plus be on-call 24/7. And, since it's a huge company that makes very precise, reliable devices, the engineering jobs require extreme specialization. The process engineering job interview focused heavily on real-world problem solving skills. They wanted someone who had lived in the lab, who had owned a tool, and had solved complicated experimental problems on it. Theoretical or academic knowledge was not a priority.

    Interview Questions

    • "Describe your most difficult problem in the lab, and how you solved it."   Answer Question
  2.  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Santa Clara, CA
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Santa Clara, CA) in April 2013.

    Interview

    My advising professor received an email from a former student saying he was looking for recent/soon-to-be graduates in Mechanical Engineering. I sent him my resume and the next day had an hour phone interview, consisting of the details of my engineering experiences and what I wanted to do in my career. The next week I had an informal interview in Santa Clara, mostly consisting of more questions about my engineering experiences, and a thorough tour of the facilities related to the position and a lot of detail about the specifics of the job (the hiring manager was very concerned both that I was a good fit for the job and that the job was a good fit for me). The next week I came in for a formal interview, consisting of a 30 minute presentation of my engineering experiences to the group and a series of one-on-one interviews with each member of the group. The questions weren’t too difficult, with the exception of a few technical questions (by the younger members) and one interviewer who had some sort of sheet of standard (mostly behavioral) interview questions for a process engineer.

    Interview Questions

    • Most unexpected: what are the 2 golden rules of an op amp (I’m a mechanical engineer)?   2 Answers

    Reasons for Declining

    The job sounded amazing, but I got another offer for another (also amazing) job which had a much better location with regard to family and affordable housing.

  3.  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Chandler, AZ
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Chandler, AZ) in March 2012.

    Interview

    I submitted my resume in the system, and I got a phone interview with an engineering in 30 minutes regarding my research. After I passed a phone interview, I got on-site interview. There are three other candidates with different engineering backgrounds. We took turns to interview with 4 team members and finally got an interview with a hiring manager. After all interviews were done, and we presented our research to the team members. It was a day-long process.

    Interview Questions

    • Difficult questions were coming from the current technical issues they had been experiencing in the process. Basically, how can we dispose polymer in the packaging process when certain sets of devices and conditions were given? The velocity of a dispenser and the amount of polymer are key outcome while varying temperature, viscosity, and configurations of polymer. You have to know about the relationship between viscosity and force and the characteristics of polymer. Another important thing that you should remember is how temperature is affecting the shear force of polymer. There are rare happenings of brimming over the die package specification. You should know about why it is happening, how you can handle it, and what might be the solution techniques at least in a brief format.   Answer Question
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  5. Helpful (1)  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Intel Corporation in November 2009.

    Interview

    It was a typical interview starting with the manager explaining me about the job, work at the particular location and the expectations. This was followed by a short interview with a very senior employee. This was followed by a presentation of my graduate research to a group of 4 engineers with a Q&A session at the end. I had lunch with 2 engineers some from the same group at the presentation. I was asked a combination of behavioral and research related questions during lunch and was provided with information about the area. I had one more interview with the second level manager followed by the manager closing out the interview with a brief tour of the facility. Overall the interview had gone as expected where I had to answer a lot of situation related questions and hence a slightly difficult but positive one.

    Interview Questions

    • How will you deal with a situation where all others in your group do not agree with you on something from your work   1 Answer

    Negotiation

    I did not try negotiating since the offer was more than I had expected. Also I was informed by other friends who already work at the company that they do not negotiate the salary for recent college graduate hires. The offer is made on phone where you write down all the details and make a decision. They do offer to give you some time (I am guessing not more than a day or two) to think over the offer and make a decision.

  6.  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Hillsboro, OR
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 4 weeks. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Hillsboro, OR) in February 2010.

    Interview

    Met with folks from Intel during our spring campus fair. Gave resume and talked with people. Got a phone call from a hiring manager. Was asked to comeby for an onsite interview. Had like 8 or 9 one-on-one interviews. Was a tiring and a good experience.

    Interview Questions

    • How would be able to apply your phd work with Intel ?   1 Answer
    • Do you like a manager who 'micromanages' or do you like a manager who leaves you a bit loose and does not follow what you are doing on an hourly basis ?   2 Answers

    Negotiation

    No..not really.. I guess Intel pays well compared to other places.. Have an open and broad mindset and you will be fine..

  7. Helpful (15)  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Hillsboro, OR
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 1+ week. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Hillsboro, OR) in May 2010.

    Interview

    I met Intel recruiters at a conference in the Portland area. As luck would have it, one was a past acquaintance of mine, and he personally took my resume and passed it along to interested managers. What followed was a frustrating series of several weeks of missed late-night phone calls and sporadic emails with a couple of hiring managers. Eventually, though, I had an hour-long phone interview with a hiring manager. We discussed my experience, PhD research, and career goals in great depth, and at the end of it, he asked me to fly out for an in-person interview 8 days later. I was asked to prepare an hour-long presentation on my PhD research, and given a precise schedule of my interview (8:30am - 6:30 pm!!!) several days ahead of time. Intel arranged my flight, rental car, and a very comfortable hotel near their campus. They also reimbursed my food and other expenses with a generous flat fee and no hassles. My interview consisted of my hour-long presentation and Q&A, then about 12 one-on-one meetings with members of the group I would join, everyone from young engineers who had been there for 2-3 years to a VP who had been with Intel for 20 years. The younger guys mostly went first. They asked extremely smart and detailed questions about my research and experience, and explained to me some of their group's organization and basic analysis techniques and processes. I was glad that I wrote lots of this down, as I met more senior managers later, and they were clearly looking to see that I had gained a better understanding of individual members' roles and could intelligently discuss the group's workflow and goals. There were no random problem-solving questions, but I did have a couple of pertinent "gotcha" questions about relevant statistical analysis and basic CMOS design, which I answered fairly well. Many picked oddball elements of my resume, included hobbies and unrelated academic interests, and asked me questions about those. During my hour-long lunch break, 4 younger group members took me out to a nice restaurant and were sociable but kind of hands-off as if they'd been instructed to give my brain a break, for which I was grateful. I've read on hear that other candidates seem annoyed by Intel's practice of having many interviewers ask similar questions. I do not think this is accidental, and saw lots of evidence that interviewers were talking to each other behind the scenes. I think Intel's interview is meant, in part, to be a test of stamina: can you talk about yourself and your experience intelligently for a whole ten hour day while keeping a patient and cheerful disposition, and learning something about the company as well along the way? That being said, all my interviewers were extremely courteous in terms of offering me plentiful coffee/juice and bathroom breaks throughout the day. Individual interviews started and ended precisely on time. My final interview was with the hiring manager who had done my phone interview. After the final interview, he told me on the spot that I had got the job and that a formal offer would be forthcoming in a few days. This was conducted via a phone call with an entirely separate HR manager. My offer was very generous, and I did not need to negotiate anything. Intel's interview process struck me as extremely smart and well-designed. In addition to them learning a lot about me, I got the feeling that they were trying to make me enthusiastic about their group, and to encourage me to want to be a part of their "club." It worked. I can see this being frustrating for less sociable candidates, but that's part of what they want, I think.

    Interview Questions

    • Can you draw the transistor-level schematic of a CMOS NAND gate?   1 Answer
    • Can you tell me about an experience you've had in analyzing a large and complex data set?   1 Answer

    Negotiation

    My offer was a bit more generous than what I planned to counter-offer, so I did not negotiate anything, though I did have to get written clarifications about Intel's /extremely/ complex bonus structure. The offer was relayed to me by an HR rep I had never met, which I think was intentional, so that I would have less information about how much negotiating room I had. My offer was right at what Glassdoor listed as the mean starting salary for my position, and there was very little spread. I am guessing that Intel does not usually negotiate salary with recent PhD graduates, but others might have more insight into this.

  8. Helpful (4)  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Hillsboro, OR
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Hillsboro, OR) in October 2010.

    Interview

    I received a phone call from an Intel D1D employee who had found my resume in the Intel resume database. We played phone tag for several days during my vacation and agreed via voicemail to talk in more detail the day I returned home. I received a call from him on that day and was told the conversation would last about 45 minutes and that the caller had a series of questions he was required to ask me. I had not been informed beforehand that this was going to be a formal interview, so I had done no preparation. I was under the impression from our exchanged phone messages that we would just be talking about the details of the job to find out if I was interested in applying, since they had sought me out. During the conversation, I was asked numerous questions about my Ph.D. research. At the end of the interview, I was told that if they were interested in bringing me up to Oregon for an onsite interview, I would receive a call from an admin within the next two weeks. If I didn't receive a call, they weren't interested. If I had known the nature of the call ahead of time, I would have reviewed my dissertation and been more prepared for the interviewer's questions.

    Interview Questions

    • At what rotational speed do turbopumps operate?   2 Answers
    • What is the mean free path at 10^-6 torr?   1 Answer
    • What is a quadropole?   Answer Question
    • What is the net charge of a plasma?   2 Answers
  9.  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Hillsboro, OR
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took a week. I interviewed at Intel Corporation (Hillsboro, OR) in July 2011.

    Interview

    Applied online. Got an a e mail a few days later to set up the phone interview time. This was ~1hr phone interview, very technical, nothing like a common preliminary interview. The interviewer went straight to questions about research, and technical details on methods and instrumentation.

    Interview Questions

  10.  

    Senior Process Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Intel Corporation in January 2011.

    Interview

    Was contacted by an Intel recruiter after an Intel college recruiter took my resume. I was a little surprised to be contacted because the college recruiter did not give me a 1:1 interview as he had done with others. The recruiter which I later found out was an area manager was very nice. A few personal/technical questions and he offered me a site visit. The site visit interviews vary by group. It can be very technical or you may fall on a group that is more looking for a personality fit. Either way, come prepared, practice your talk beforehand and come with confidence. Be prepared for a long day.

    Negotiation

    Did not negotiate

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