Lookout Interview Questions

Updated Jul 20, 2015
19 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Senior Software Quality Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 1+ weekinterviewed at Lookout (San Francisco, CA).

    Interview

    They are moving fast. The recruiter was very friendly and efficient. There were one phone interview, then onsite interview. I have been to many onsite interviews, but I felt very bad about Lookout's onsite interview arrangement. The onsite interview has 4~5 rounds cross the lunch time, each round has two people. First round I interviewed with two people from iOS dev team. One people asked me an algorithm question needed to use recursive. Since I have out of school for a long time, I only know what real work automation programming needs to use, I couldn't answer this type of question anymore. This type of question is for new grad. But this job title is "Senior Software Quality Engineer". Also the productivity of experienced engineer is 10 times more than a new grad. After a while, I asked them to ask another question instead. But they only prepared one question, mainly a young guy, he didn't prepare anything else. Then there was next round, two QA engineers, asked test cases, it went well. After that, it's lunch time, but the recruiter came in and said that the following interview would be cut, no lunch ($8-$9). It's kind of disgusting, this type of thing will make interviewers feel bad, and may damage Lookout's reputation on recruiting Engineers. When I think again, it may be because each round two people are a lot of resource, but I think that each round only one person asks questions, why they need two people in the interview at the same time. Even there are 8~10 interviewers, but only one person is allowed to ask coding questions. I feel that his question is not practical at all. But no one else is allowed to ask practical automation coding questions to balance that out. I feel that their programming questions are more favor new grad and junior engineers, but I don't think you want to hire all new grad and junior engineers in the team.

    Interview Questions

  2. Helpful (1)  

    Talent Acquisition Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online – interviewed at Lookout (San Francisco, CA) in February 2015.

    Interview

    Had an Initial phone interview, followed by in-house interview with some of the TA team. Also met with the Vice President of the client group. In house time was approximately 4 hours onsite. Was contacted by email on the follow-up (did not get offer).

    Interview Questions

    • No stumpers - every interviewer seems to have had concerns on how to approach leadership that is not being available to interview, not doing their part of the TA cycle. Red flag if this is a trend as it shows a lack of trust in TA by leadership and/or a lack of influence by TA to leadership.   Answer Question
  3.  

    Contract Position Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeksinterviewed at Lookout (San Francisco, CA) in November 2014.

    Interview

    I first received an email from HR and scheduled a phone interview with one person in the department later that week. The call went smoothly and felt more like a conversation. I received a secondary email that I would be invited for an on-site interview where I would interview with the other 2 people in the department as well as meeting with the first person who I spoke to on the phone. At the onsite interview, the first person I met with in the department told me that the executive who was scheduled next to meet with me simply "decided to leave for the day". This was at 1:00 PM on a Friday. I thought this was unprofessional especially since the interview had been scheduled for a week already. So I continued to be interviewed by this person which consisted of typical questions. Next, I met with the woman in the department who I spoke with on the phone. She was very lax and didn't feel it was necessary to conduct another interview with me since we already talked. She wanted to discuss the company and department. She didn't leave much space for me to speak except when she wanted to know about me. I felt the tone was unprofessional. I had to email HR after 2 weeks of not hearing back to see if they had reached a decision.

    Interview Questions

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  5. Helpful (1)  

    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online – interviewed at Lookout.

    Interview

    I applied online through the website. A HR from lookout reached out to me within a week to have a 30 minute phone chat. The interview process was fairly simple and straight forward. However, I believe HR have NO clue about design or how to steer a conversation with a design candidate. He notified that he would 'forward' his notes to the the hiring manager and get back to me within two days. I sent a thank you email after two days and he got back to me saying they were moving with another candidate. My feedback for lookout as a company is that.. Either train your hr to have meaningful design oriented conversation or just GET a designer to interview another designer! Please! It's difficult to talk to a person about design process:methodology when your recruiting team doesn't have the comprehensive knowledge about design.

    Interview Questions

    • What is your favorite marketing agency company? Who is your favorite industrial designer? What do you think about the lookout website?   Answer Question

    Lookout Response

    Oct 30, 2014 – Lead Talent Scout

    Thanks so much for the great feedback! We do everything we can to make sure each candidate has a valuable experience with us. We are working to make sure each recruiter knows their disciplines ... More

  6. Helpful (3)  

    Senior Product Marketing Manager (Enterprise) Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter – interviewed at Lookout (San Francisco, CA).

    Interview

    Recruiter reached out to me through LI, and asked if I was interested. I said I was, and there was just a brief initial phone screen and then a phone call with the hiring manager. I was then brought onsite and I must say I was quite disappointed. Nobody seemed to know what the job entailed, and the hiring manager simply said "the organization is in transition" whenever she couldn't answer my questions. Moreover, one of the interviewers seemed to have a chip on her shoulder and when I estimated the number of users they had, cut me off and exclaimed that it was much higher. After checking out her LI profile, I could see why...she describes herself in very effusive terms and has this notion of being some sort of GM, even though she's not. Another potential colleague wasn't even on the interview list leading me to wonder whether he was being pushed out. The product management counterpart was apparently "out sick". All in all, quite a disorganized interview process.

    Interview Questions

    • How would you grow the market share of a new product?   1 Answer

    Lookout Response

    Sep 17, 2014 – Lead Talent Scout

    We're very sorry to hear about your negative experience. Thanks so much for posting this, really helpful feedback for us as we scale our process. If you're comfortable with it, I would urge you to ... More

  7. Helpful (4)  

    Marketing Manager Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Houston, TX
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online – interviewed at Lookout (Houston, TX).

    Interview

    Applied through Linkedin and called for an initial phone interview that evening. After initial phone interview which was pretty informal, I was moved to the next step in the process - another phone interview with the Product Manager. This interview was almost a duplicate of the first but lasted longer and the interviewer was somewhat impersonal. I was told at the end of this interview that I would hear back from them in a couple of days. It has been over a month and I haven't heard from anyone at Lookout. I've sent 2 follow-up emails to both interviewers and still haven't gotten a response. I can't understand how a successful startup can treat candidates so unprofessionally.

    Interview Questions

  8. Helpful (3)  

    Marketing Role Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online – interviewed at Lookout (San Francisco, CA).

    Interview

    I went through several rounds of phone interviews and a few on-site half-day interview sessions, which culminated in having to give a presentation in front of the entire company. I'm not sure if they still require you to do the presentation but at the time they made everyone who got to the latter stages present on a topic of their choice--engineers, management, HR...you name it. After numerous interviews, having to take a good chunk of time off work, and slaving over my presentation, the hiring contact went completely MIA. I had to follow up numerous times to get a straight answer, which is they decided to not even hire for the position. Not cool. Other friends who have interviewed there had similar experiences. There seems to be a lot of haphazardly interviewing. If they don't respect your time when you're interviewing, how will they treat you when you're an employee?

    Interview Questions

    • Don't remember the exact questions, but they asked a lot about process. How you would handle certain situations/challenges and why.   Answer Question
  9. Helpful (2)  

    Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    No Offer
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied in-person. The process took a weekinterviewed at Lookout in October 2013.

    Interview

    2 rounds of phone interviews followed by 4 in person meetings (all on the same day 30 mins each) Met Marketing, PM, Engineering and Design teams. Generally a fun, stress free experience.

    Interview Questions

    • Generally the interview tested: Product thinking. e.g. qn: how would you design a spice dispenser for a blind person? Design questions. e.g. qn: three apps on your phone which you like and what makes them great PM planning: e.g. qn: how would you approach the feature build planning process Way of thinking. e.g. qn: design an elevator system for a typical hospital   Answer Question
  10. Helpful (6)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Accepted Offer

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral – interviewed at Lookout.

    Interview

    One or two phone interviews followed by a full day of onsite interviews. Usually 3-4 interviews, consisting of a pair of interviewers. One will be pure coding (can you write code on a whiteboard), one will be architecture/design, and one will be a sort of vague culture/team fit interview. If there's a fourth interview, it'll be with the hiring manager, tying up any loose ends.

    Interview Questions

    • Questions really vary from interview to interview. I'd be prepared to re-design a popular social media service on the spot. Obivously not end-to-end in detail, but they want to see how you approach such a problem.   Answer Question
  11. Helpful (33)  

    Mobile Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took a weekinterviewed at Lookout (San Francisco, CA) in May 2013.

    Interview

    So I just finished a entire interview sequence with Lookout and thought it would be good to recap the experience for future candidates who come along down the line. Here is the way Lookout prefers to do their interviews: an introductory conversation with the internal recruiter, two technical phone interviews which will involve coding in Collabedit, then two on-site interviews where the last on-site interview includes a technical presentation covering anything of the candidate's choice. Lookout takes up two floors of a building in the downtown Financial District, steps away from the Embarcadero BART station (i.e. relatively easy & straightforward to get to from the East Bay, and a short Muni Metro ride from the Caltrain station for those coming in from the Peninsula / Valley, and not really that far from the Ferry Building either). Lookout will soon be moving to a third floor. According to folks I spoke with, Lookout is currently at 193 employees where about 100 of them are engineering. The office layout is of the bare concrete floors, modern / minimalist, no cubicle, no privacy, long table variety. Everyone appears to be currently jammed onto the middle floor while the downstairs space is a larger kitchen and meeting space area. You'll be able to see natural light from almost anywhere where you're sitting in the building, although folks closer to the windows obviously get the spectacular views from the 27th floor. Theoretically real estate space will get a little looser once they open up the third, upstairs floor in the building. The day I interviewed, they were catering a fancy looking breakfast (Monday is "Frittata" day) and a diverse looking lunch spread (for an all-hands Engineering meeting). I vaguely remember somebody remarking that breakfast is catered at least two days per week. I'm not sure about the lunch situation, but there are all sorts of restaurants all around the area from which to choose from (one couldn't ask for a better location to work within SF). Water and soda and snacks are very freely available in the kitchen area and you can easily snag a bottle (or two) of whatever between sessions of spewing hot air in the interview room. When you step into the interview room, they'll hand you a interview schedule which may have slightly different interviewer names from the interview schedule they e-mailed you a few days prior (in other words, at least Lookout will be up front with who you will be speaking with; it may be worthwhile to look up their backgrounds on LinkedIn prior to arriving). If you ask for access the network (to demonstrate something or show off your portfolio hosted on some web server, etc.), you can get a business card with a password to the guest network. If your interview includes lunch, they may send you a menu and ask you to choose something. I'd strongly recommend going for the smallest thing possible or even **nothing at all**, because the last thing you want to do is have your mouth stuffed with food while trying to interact and/or explain some thing to your potential co-workers. In my interviewing day, I had four sets of one hour interviews. All of the Lookout folks I spoke with held their cards very close to their chest (in other words, I could not detect if they were pleased or dissatisfied with the way I was explaining things). Interviewers also didn't provide correction or unprompted guidance when I was accidentally making mistakes in my presentations (see next paragraph). As I was walking out the door, I pleaded with the seemingly-sympathetic internal recruiter to provide constructive criticisms to me if the team voted me down (I never look to debate any hiring manager on reasons why I get turned down, I just want some feedback to focus on so I could become a more appealing job seeker). And the very next day, he sent me the standard generic "Thanks for your interest. We've decided to go with candidates who more closely align with our business needs" turn-down e-mail. Intensely heartbreaking and frustrating at the same time. If I had to gamble who voted me down, my losing hand would be from the first set of interviewers (where I was describing how to find a winning tic-tac-toe grid): I was trying to get over my usual interview jitters and I carried on speaking pseudo-confidently while not carefully reviewing the white board where I should have realized I significantly flubbed up a few details in my scribbled code (I substituted the character "Y" in place of "O"-oh, for example). So now the feedback (which I worked up myself typing this review) is "stay calm & pay close attention to what you're writing on the board". Hopefully my experience flunking the Lookout interview will properly prepare for you to pass your interviewing day. If you find any of the information in my interview review helpful, please let me know by voting "Yes" on the "Helpful?" question below (this helps to motivate me to be as detailed as possible).

    Interview Questions

    • Design an algorithm where you can detect a winning Tic-Tac-Toe game. Note: I heard anecdotally that their approach might instead focus on some card game (e.g. Poker or Blackjack or whatever), so be ready for shenanigans like this.   1 Answer
    • How would you implement a multiplayer Tic-Tac-Toe game?   1 Answer
    • Here's phone question # 1: What is an anagram? A word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as cinema, formed from iceman. Assumptions: 1) An anagram of a word is the same length as the word. 2) You can assume for this exercise that any word is composed of unique characters, i.e., only one occurence of any given character. 3) Assume all characters are lower case, if they are letters. Write a method that given a single word and a dictionary text file (csv of words), returns a set of all anagrams of that word from the dictionary. In: Word is 'act', CSV is 'tac, cat, taa, tact' Out: 'tac, cat'   1 Answer
    • Explain how the following two data structures work, and their pros and cons. 1) Hash table 2) Linked List (Unordered) bonus question (ugh): Why would you ever use a Unordered Linked List for storage of items?   2 Answers
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