Next Jump

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Next Jump Interview Questions & Reviews in Boston, MA

Updated Mar 26, 2014
All Interviews Received Offers

Getting an Interview  

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Interview Experience  

27%
27%
45%

Interview Difficulty  

Average Difficulty
11 candidate interviews Back to all interview questions
Relevance Date Difficulty
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No Offer

Neutral Experience

Very Easy Interview

Web Applications Interview

Web Applications
Cambridge, MA

I applied through college or university and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Next Jump.

Interview Details – I applied through my college's career fair. The interview was pretty basic. It was divided into two parts, 30 minutes each. The first one was something like an informal talk about my background and things like that. The second one was a technical interview. The questions included:

a. Markup + CSS for two floated boxes separated by 200px empty space between them.
b. Find the the most repeated element in an array.
c. What is a class, object, inheritance?
d. What is a linked list? Where is it better than an unsorted array?
e. Some pretty basic Big Oh questions. I don't remember what exactly it was but was something along the lines of what's the insertion time for a linked-list.
f. Design DB tables for a gaming site.
g. Write a SQL query to get the most recent ratings of all the games sorted by their ratings (each game has multiple rows of ratings). Pretty standard case of using subqueries.

Interview Question – The questions were pretty easy- nothing was unexpected.   Answer Question


Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Web Development Intern Interview

Web Development Intern
Cambridge, MA

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Next Jump in March 2013.

Interview Details – Pretty standard process. The Super Saturday was a great experience.


No Offer

Negative Experience

Difficult Interview

Account Executive Interview

Account Executive
Boston, MA

I applied online and the process took 3 days - interviewed at Next Jump in February 2013.

Interview Details – First was a phone interview with basic questions: are you willing to relocate, what kind of work are you hoping for, etc.

Next, they flew me and all the other candidates to Boston for one weekend and had us do some hands-on interviewing.

The morning started with an introduction to the company, then they placed us into offices and cubicles and had us complete three tasks.

The first was to create a five-minute pitch to sell the company to a potential client. They surprised us a few minutes beforehand by saying it was a one-minute pitch. Then, they had a current employee come in and we pitched it.

The next was to create a map about somebody who was influential in our lives and a few reasons why. You could either create a poster or a powerpoint.

The afternoon was interspersed with a "career fair" where they introduced you to the various job tracks at Nextjump. There was also a catered lunch where you were able to ask questions of current employees and the owner.

Finally, in the afternoon, we had to work in groups to design a rewards program for a client. We presented "against" another group and critiqued each other. Current employees picked a winner.

Interview Question – Who is the most influential person in your life?   Answer Question


1 person found this helpful

No Offer

Negative Experience

Average Interview

Web Applications Interview

Web Applications
Boston, MA

I applied online and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Next Jump in October 2013.

Interview Details – They had come to my university's career fair and I submitted my resume then. However, I didn't hear back for a while. So, I applied online and got an email to come in for an interview 2 days later. The on-site had 2 interviews - one behavioral and second was technical with HTML/CSS/PHP/MySQL questions. They were all pretty basic.

I was then invited to their "Super Saturday" at NYC- they arrange your accommodation and travel expenses. BUT, I was handed a "train" ticket. Worse was yet to come. I checked in to my hotel room and was having shower, when someone was trying very hard to open the door. They make you share the room with a complete stranger and don't even tell you a word about it.

"Super" Saturday isn't so super as its very exhausting. They do arrange for your lunch and stuff. But, there are 50 other candidates and I soon realized that I didn't want to work for the company. Everyone of their employees kept talking about how "amazing their life is at NextJump and how work-life balance is super important to NextJump". The exaggeration was a bit too much and most of us had realized that they are lying. Some of the reviews from their ex-employees do talk about "long long" hours. In fact, the CEO did blurt it out during his speech that "if you're working for 60hours a week". There is just too much of "how awesome we are" and two tests of 30mins and 60mins each.

The technical questions included:
1. Creating a box containing two other boxes inside it (one on left and right, but 200px away from each other) and centering the outer box - pretty standard.

2. Finding the value of an element from an array, which occurs most number of times - there's an inbuilt php function to do this. Both, me and my interviewer, didn't know about this. I came back home and looked up php.net to learn it.

3. Create a counter in JS to continuously increment the value and display it in a text box.

4. Big-O questions - this is where I lose it for companies. I don't like studying for these sorts of things as a web developer.

5. Another 3 big php questions - they were solvable, but not in 40mins they give you. Then you have their employees saying "it could have been done in 20mins".

Interview Question – Big-O related algo based questions!   Answer Question


No Offer

Negative Experience

Systems Administrator Interview

Systems Administrator
Cambridge, MA

I applied through a recruiter and interviewed at Next Jump.

Interview Details – Had a phone screen, which was not anything beyond the ordinary, then went to the office for a second round. The interview consisted of 3 parts. A multiple choice test, questions from the interviewer, and a computer test.

My suggestion to anyone: if someone hands you a 45 minute multiple choice test upon entering an interview, walk out. The sections were: networking, Windows, Linux, and virtualization. The test consisted of very exact information, such as remembering Linux command flags or locations of files. 95% of the questions could be easily solvable through man pages or google, and did not represent problem solving skills at all. The "virtualization" section was all vmware. If you don't know vmware, you just lost 1/4 of the test. Also, if you don't work on the Windows side of things, there goes another 1/4.

The interviewer than asked me a series of questions, none of them too difficult, however I couldn't answer one about Apache.

That same question ended up being on the computer test, which consisted of two problems and gave you 45 minutes. With the terminal at hand, I answered the first question in about 5 minutes. It ended up that the Apache server just had to be reset and the index directory in the config file was incorrect. The second problem wasn't prepared correctly on the computer and was already solved! So instead, I dug into the code they provided on their Apache server and figured out what the problem would be, then provided a solution. After finishing, I probably waited around 20 minutes for the interviewer to get back.

Overall, the interviewer seemed very concerned about the multiple choice test and ignored pretty much the rest of the interview. I find this to be a prime example of what is wrong with tech recruiting.

Interview Question – What is the command to untar a file verbosely?   View Answer


Declined Offer

Negative Experience

Very Difficult Interview

Network Administrator Interview

Network Administrator
Cambridge, MA

I applied online and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at Next Jump in December 2012.

Interview Details – Worse place ever. The interview process of horrific. You go thru two phone interviews. The first is a general one with a non-technical recruiter. The second is more intensive and you are excessively questioned requiring your background and technical know how. Upon the successfull phone screen I was brought in for a in person interview. I was advised to park in the Kendall Square Cinema parking garage thinking it would be validated or possibly free.

Once on site, the place was like a horror movie. There was no one to work the door for you. After a long wait and after repeated attempts to contact my my recruiter I was finally let in and made to wait even more. The office was dirty and there so called flat screen had finger prints all over them.

Once I was brought in meet the recruiter I new this was not the place for me. Besides the fact that the first 15 employee desks was empty, this place was beyond a joke. Being humble as I am I did not leave just yet. I was giving a 2hr writing exam, then placed take a hands on lab exercise on how to mount a file system, ftp etc. which also took about an hr to complete. After all this painfull process I was further interrogated by two individuals and a possible third which at that I point I advised that I had enough of there BS!

However, the icing on the bake is that my ticket was not validated and it cost me a Whooping $25 bucks for parking. Worse place ever. Please do not waste your time!

Interview Question – The atmosphere is boring and completely is a doomsday!   Answer Question

Reason for Declining – The place had no life. Completely dead. They are lying to say it is a fun place to work!


No Offer

Negative Experience

Average Interview

Web Programmer Interview

Web Programmer
Boston, MA

I applied in-person and the process took a day - interviewed at Next Jump in April 2010.

Interview Details – Consisted of a general HR interview and then a technical interview involving standard programming, data structure and efficiency questions. For a web programing position, there were a surprisingly large amount of programming questions, which leads me to believe that the position more heavily emphasizes programmer rather than creative.

Interview Question – Efficiency of linked lists   Answer Question


1 person found this helpful

Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Easy Interview

General Occupation Interview

General Occupation
Cambridge, MA

The process took 2 days - interviewed at Next Jump in April 2010.

Interview Details – HR asks couple of questions about your personality, if you answer some arrogant answers, you will get red flag and they will not call you back no matter what your technical skills are.
As some employees feedback here, tell them when NextJump will be next Google, how can you help them to do that. They like to hear those sentences.
You need to make HR or person who interviews you feel so great, be very positive then you will get the job. Your technical skills are not that important to get the job because HR people are inexperienced and they're driven by their emotions.

Multiple choice and simulation test were the hardest one and I knew that I failed, however I got the job cause I suggested them that I could help NextJump to be next Google, it was piece of cake.

Interview Question – Did you take part in a team, do you like teamwork?   View Answer


No Offer

Neutral Experience

Difficult Interview

Software Engineer Interview

Software Engineer
Cambridge, MA

The process took a day - interviewed at Next Jump in February 2011.

Interview Details – I went to Super Saturday where for one day a bunch of candidates take tests, make pitches, listen to presentations, etc. NextJump has everything in place to be a great environment to work in. All the standard perks and then some: food, in-house gym facility, laundry service, etc. The big question left unanswered is the atmosphere. How are the people? The signals I got on this were mixed. Most of the employees (especially the programmers) seemed unenthusiastic and aloof. A few were more excited. That coupled with the numerous bad reviews on glassdoor should make one very wary... Could be a great place to work or an awful one that's posing as an awesome one (which I would say is far worse). Hard to say from my limited perspective and things could change for better or worse at any time.

Interview Question – Describe a time in your life where you were in a disadvantaged position.   Answer Question


No Offer

Neutral Experience

Average Interview

Software Engineer Interview

Software Engineer
Boston, MA

I applied through college or university and the process took a day - interviewed at Next Jump in February 2011.

Interview Details – I spoke with a couple of Next Jump representatives at my university's career fair and they invited me to interview. The interview took about an hour and consisted of two parts. The first was an HR interview during which I was asked all of the typical questions: what do you do with your free time, talk about an experience working in a group, things like that. Nothing too difficult. The second part was completely technical. The guy basically quizzed me on all of the basic data structures and asked a few questions about HTML and CSS. Both of the interviewers were very nice, The technical interviewer laughed A LOT, even while I was writing code on a notepad as he watched. It made me feel a bit nervous about the code!

After the interview, I was invited by email to Super Saturday (or was in Sunday?) in NYC. Since I had no car, NYC is three or four hours away, and Next Jump's events began early in the morning, it would have been too much of a hassle to attend, so I declined. Never heard from them again.

Interview Questions

  • How would you center a div?   View Answers (3)
  • What is the big O notation of finding an element in a binary search tree? A linked list? A hash table? Etc   Answer Question

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