Operation Homefront

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Operation Homefront Interview Questions

Updated May 25, 2014
Updated May 25, 2014
2 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Client Service Representative Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Interview Details

    Contacted over the phone to come in for an initial interview as soon as possible. Interview included general interview questions including strengths and weaknesses, as well as goals and aspirations.

    Interview Questions
    • What was the most difficult moment in your life and how did you deal with it.   Answer Question
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Property Management Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeksinterviewed at Operation Homefront in May 2011.

    Interview Details

    I had a very strange experience with this organization. I completed a phone interview, one in-person interview and a final phone interview with a Vice President/COO. The questions were very formulaic and the responses to my questions made me realize that the organization was most likely disorganized and lacking in long term planning and leadership. After all 3 interviews, I was offered the job. But something didn't seem quite right and I couldn't quite figure it out. After the job offer I did some digging into the organization. There's quite a lot of controversy for a nonprofit, even a national one; it's a bit much. Also, the pay was terrible considering this is the DC area, the position is salaried, and you were required to be available at a moment's notice to work evenings and weekends--overtime without pay, time compensation, etc. So, essentially your worth goes down if you're working longer work weeks. I felt like the organization, which is based in TX, was offering TX salaries in DC, but maybe the organization just paid staff poorly. From our conversations--which I felt were somewhat stoic, atypically guarded and lacking in depth -- to the exhaustion that one of the interviewers seemed to be experiencing in her job, I got the feeling that the organization may not treat its employees as well as they should.

    The benefits were explained to me as including the following: 401k after 6 months of employment with a match of 4%, 10 days off, typical health coverage but for the employee only, holidays off, 8 sick days and one floating holiday. Very typical benefits, but for the DC area where national nonprofits are paying 100% for employees on health insurance (and offering domestic partnerships and family coverage), matching 401s after a 3 month period and at a higher rate, among other better benefits, overall, it's a raw deal for the DC area.

    Interview Questions
    • Is there anything that would prevent you from being readily available to work at any time?   View Answer
    Reasons for Declining

    I dug around and found that the person who had the job prior was let go after a short period of time. Not a good sign. I asked about why the position was empty, but the supervisor was reluctant to say anything—not even saying the position just wasn’t a good fit. Fishy. The same supervisor (who would provider oversight from TX) had only been on the job for a few months. Not a stable department. Playing along, I verbally accepted so I could learn more before truly accepting the position. Interestingly, during the interview process I was asked if there was anything that would prevent me from being able to work late and on weekends at the last minute. My answer was no. That's typically a coded question for, "Do you have kids?" And since I did, after I got the verbal offer I asked how often I could expect to work late and on weekends in the course of a month. About 4-5 times. Well, even though I'm a parent, that's not a big deal—I do comparable late hours and weekend work now. So I asked if my regular work hours could generally be defined as 7:30 to 4:30--so that I could pick my daughter up from daycare each day. Now, the interview process was over and I had already been offered the job so I felt OK to open up about the fact that I'm a working mom. By now, I even got an official offer letter. At the same time, I asked about insurance for domestic partners. The HR people didn't even know if they offered that, saying they'd have to call me back. They never did. Those 2 things--asking for a set schedule (while stating my complete willingness to alter my schedule based on day-to-day work needs--which I made very clear) and inquiring about domestic partnerships for insurance was enough for the supervisor to leave me a voice mail rescinding my "verbal” offer. She said it as if the organization hadn't already given me a letter offer. I think the company has a good mission, but if something feels fishy, it probably is.

    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

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