San Francisco District Attorney's Office

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San Francisco District Attorney's Office Interview Questions

3 Interview Reviews

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Interview Experience

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Getting an Interview

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  1.  

    Deputy District Attorney Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through an employee referral - interviewed at San Francisco District Attorney's Office in August 2010.

    Interview Details

    First, unlike every other gov't office in California, they never post when they're actually hiring. You just have to somehow know, by knowing the right people and having them suddenly call you, "It's time!! Send in your resume!!" THEN, you need to have the someone you know actually pluck your resume out and put it on the desk of one of the hiring committee. Then, maybe you will get a call.

    The entire process is, like everything related to San Francisco government, extremely politicized. After two internships at the DA's, I was sure getting a job would not be difficult. The first time I applied, I received a form letter back saying I wasn't experienced enough (even though a quick search of the calbar site showed they hired people right out of law school all the time). So I got another job, got more experience and re-applied. Rejected again. I was told "you need more city contacts and community work." I volunteered, I worked on campaigns, I got another city job, and made plenty of contacts in the upper reaches of the DA's and other city offices (and again, a quick search of calbar shows they hire people with absolutely no ties to the community at all, all the time).

    Finally, I got the call, "get your resume in right now!" "Oops, sorry, it wasn't quite quick enough." I waited another year, finally got my resume in and got an interview.

    The interview itself was not difficult, and I feel I answered the questions pretty well, amply demonstrating not only my legal knowledge and committment to a career as a prosecutor in SF (I had in-depth knowledge of all the various departments within the office, the various community outreach programs, etc.), but to city service in general (I had done a lot of community work).

    The questions asked were the typical DA office hypotheticals: one concerned a domestic violence incident and whether or not there would be a difference in prosecution based on the suspect being male or female, then there were questions so they could get an idea of how much you knew about the department, the DA's programs, etc., so if you get called for an interview, make sure you know about the office.

    After a seemingly positive interview, a week goes by. A second week goes by. I contact an acquaintance there to find out if they'd made a decision. Silence. Another week goes by. I email the head of the hiring committee to check in and see if a decision had been made More silence. Another three weeks go by and I email her again. Her response? To paraphrase, "Oh, you didn't get your rejection yet? I thought we had sent it. My bad."

    A form rejection came two weeks later. In short, a sloppy, and highly politicized office. A disappointment from start to finish.

    Interview Questions
    • The suspect was arrested for pushing significant other. SO landed on bed. Do you prosecute? (not really that difficult)   Answer Question
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview
  2.  

    Assistant District Attorney's Office Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3 weeks - interviewed at San Francisco District Attorney's Office in April 2008.

    Interview Details

    It's all about not what you know, but who you know. There's a "pipeline" from UCSF currently.

    Interview Questions
    • Explaining your trial record. The interviews are conducted by two attorneys, but recently they have changed the format of the interviews. They ask questions, but you would do best not to know the questions. No one really reveals the true nature of the interview. It won't help since they'll know if you "cheated" or not on the questions they ask you.   View Answer
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview
  3.  

    Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate  in  San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through college or university. The process took a day - interviewed at San Francisco District Attorney's Office in October 2009.

    Interview Details

    The interview that I got was through one of the fairs organized at my school. I talked to the person that was representing the San Francisco District attorney office. The interview started with the representatives offering a background of what the office does and who do they work with.
    The interview went pretty well. They asked questions such as: a. why would I want to work at the SF District Attorney Office?; b. If I have ever worked with lower income families and what my experience was? c. What skills do I have? d. How flexible I am? e. If I am prelaw or why do I want to get involved in legal matters?
    The reason why i didn't get it is because I am not prelaw or I don't have a legal background or desire to pursue the field.

    Interview Questions
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

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