TAMKO
2.9 of 5 17 reviews
www.tamko.com Joplin, MO 1000 to 5000 Employees

TAMKO Interview Questions & Reviews

Updated Jun 9, 2014
All Interviews Received Offers

Getting the Interview 

52%
47%

Interview Experience 

37%
25%
37%

Interview Difficulty 

Average Difficulty
9 candidate interviews
Relevance Date Difficulty
in

Declined Offer

Negative Experience

Average Interview

Outside Sales Representative Interview

Outside Sales Representative

I applied online and the process took 5+ weeks - interviewed at TAMKO.

Interview Details – Interview with Regional manager, then director of the West then flew me to corporate in Joplin, MO. Was offered the job. The whole process was enjoyable and I was happy with everything. The bad part comes when they forget to discuss some of their policies such as you cannot have 1 (ONE!) day off within your first 12 months. They tried saying no to me going to my brother's wedding! They finally said it was OK after discussions with upper managerment but by that point I was in so much shock and disgusted that any company would do that. I ended up expressing my feeling about the situation to my soon to be manager. The next day I received a call saying they are no longer offering me the job. They preach how much they care about work life balance but have to go through hoops to get 2 days off for my brothers wedding. If you want to be a workaholic your first 12 months, go work for TAMKO!!

Interview Question – nothing, they were all easy.   Answer Question

Reason for Declining – see my description above

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No Offer

Neutral Experience

Electrical Engineer Interview

Electrical Engineer

Interviewed at TAMKO

Interview Details – Phone interview through a recruiter and was asked to complete an online assessment. Assessment questions were based on answering questions with three words given and having to pick the fourth from a multiple choice.

Interview Question – Situation were a manager was not clear about instructions, how would you go about confronting them?   Answer Question

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Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Controls Engineer Interview

Controls Engineer

I applied online and the process took 2 months - interviewed at TAMKO.

Interview Details – There were 2 phone interviews and 2 on-site interviews. Expect technical questions down to ladder logic.

Interview Question – Draw ladder logic to perform certain operation like toggle switch.   Answer Question

Negotiation Details – Negotiate hard for compensation and PTO as benefits aren't that great.

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3 people found this helpful

Accepted Offer

Negative Experience

Average Interview

Six Sigma Black Belt Interview

Six Sigma Black Belt
Joplin, MO

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 3 months - interviewed at TAMKO.

Interview Details – After separating from the military, I went through a military-specific headhunter, who did a great job preparing us for interviews and getting in initial interviews at a conference with 10-12 companies over the course of two days. Most interviews were pretty much the same, including TAMKO.
One of TAMKO's master black belts was performing the interviews, and talked a lot about the great company culture, how they carry no loans, and lots of liquid capital so they do not have to let employees go during tough times. Additionally, they talked a lot about the training that they provide to Black belts, how they hire almost exclusively ex-military officers for the position, and how many different opportunities there was after a 1-2 year stint as a Black Belt- Line manager, assistant general manager, research/development, lab manager, as well as many other managerial positions. The locations were a huge turn-off, being from the East Coast- Dallas, Tuscaloosa, Phillipsburg (Kansas), Joplin (Missouri) and the one real possibility was in Frederick (Maryland).
I had little interest in making roofing shingles, or working in the mid-west, but foolishly accepted the follow-up interview in person at TAMKO HQ in Joplin, MO. I met with another Master black belt, as well as taking the tour of all the executives and talking with the Sr. VP for TAMKO. There were no really difficult questions, all the same canned questions that you would expect, as well as "what books have you read recently," which was easy to give the correct answer, as the reading list had been regurgitated several times before then, and I had the chance to pick up one or two. Again they preached about how much everyone loved TAMKO, how data-driven they are, and their "Play book"- which is simply a list of 15 unmemorizable rantings about how the owner expects people to do their jobs.
I had one other offer, but the draw of cheap cost of living, respectable salary, and unwillingness to look elsewhere for a better job were too much to pass up at the time... now I regret it.
There was no "welcome to the company". I had to figure out how to get in contact with IT so I could get a computer to work with. They had no desk for me. I sat around reading the "reading list" for 5 months before I started training. I had no mentorship or direction from more experienced black belts, master black belts, or any one else- it was "figure it out for yourself" mode. What was heralded as a "Company embracing Six Sigma" was "management demands Six Sigma, and the manufacturing people push back as hard as possible". In project meetings, line workers would simply not say anything, even when directly asked a question. They would withhold information simply to make life difficult because a prior black belt pissed them off. There is no tolerance on the production floor for attempting to change processes, and there is no support to help fix that.
The director of Six Sigma had already run one plant to closure, and was fired in to the "Director of Six Sigma" position, and has no idea of anything going on, including statistics or Six Sigma methodology. The Six Sigma secretary kept the entire program running, and she was recently fired... so much for "we keep people around on the bad times". The only people in the company that you will meet in interviews are the ones that "survived" the Black Belt program, and were "yes men" for their entire tenure, lying about profits from projects and simply creating target values for processes. The expectation is that current black belts should be reaping equal financial savings as those who had projects 10 years ago, before any improvements were made.
When the owner decides that the economy is taking a down turn, they begin with company-wide "performance issue" firings- firing people with severance packages. 40-50 people at a time will suddenly develop "performance issues" and will be "involuntarily separated". No, TAMKO doesn't lay people off during recessions, they fire them and give money to shut them up.

The bottom line- take everything... EVERYTHING you hear in a TAMKO interview with a grain of salt, and remember that you're likely talking to a lawyer. They are legally allowed to claim whatever they want, and it is up to you to do due diligence and check references for the company.

Interview Question – What books have you read recently?   View Answer

Negotiation Details – There was little negotiation time- they expected an answer within a week and were calling after I did not respond immediately. You have to negotiate for vacation in the first year, negotiate your salary, and try to keep them completely honest- the company is run by lawyers.

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Accepted Offer

Positive Experience

Average Interview

Six Sigma Black Belt Interview

Six Sigma Black Belt

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at TAMKO in April 2011.

Interview Details – These positions are generally filled through a JMO recruiter hiring conference. The initial interview will last 30 minutes. Afterward, desired candidates are sent an email to complete an assessment test. Qualified candidates are flown to Joplin, MO and conduct a round robin of interviews. Offers NLT 2 Weeks

Interview Question – Its all about fit.   View Answer

Negotiation Details – Salary between 70-95K based on location and degree work. Vacation must be negotiated.

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No Offer

Negative Experience

Very Easy Interview

Sales Representative Interview

Sales Representative
Chicago, IL

I applied online - interviewed at TAMKO in February 2013.

Interview Details – I went through the application and interview process for a sales rep position with TEMKO. Not really impressed with the company. Job was posted on Linkedin and sent them my resume. The HR department than sent me an assessment test. It was a pretty standard behavioral and IQ test that took about one hour plus to complete, 300 questions and problems. It was a basic algebra and word association test. Then I received a call from an HR rep for an interview to be scheduled, no phone interview. Than I was sent an email no thank you letter that they had no interest. A few hours later I received a call from HR that the email was sent by mistake and the interview was still on? The interview was held at a Starbucks near the entrance that was completely busy, music blaring in the background and customers sitting two feet on either side. Very unprofessional, I felt very uncomfortable with the process and since I am still employed felt my current job could be compromised holding a interview in public. All I could think about was how to get out of there quickly. The interviewer brought along another sales rep who had probably never interviewed anyone before. Both interviewers were not very well prepared and asked a few off the cuff informal questions relating to the position. The questions were pretty standard like why are you leaving, what is a normal day like for you, how do you obtain leads. Overall on a scale of 1-10 it was about a 3. Not really interested in pursuing the job further. I would think if you want to obtain quality employees it would be helpful to try to sell your company a little. They did not make me feel like it was a place I would want to work for, but the market is saturated with people looking for work. Good luck to all!

Interview Question – What is a typical day like for you?   Answer Question

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No Offer

Neutral Experience

Average Interview

Project Engineer Interview

Project Engineer
Inwood, WV

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at TAMKO in July 2012.

Interview Details – I was called up by a recruiter out of the blue one day about a position at Tamko in Inwood, WV. The guy said the pay was well within my salary requirements. So I agreed to do a phone interview with the company. I already had a job at another company so It was going to take something to get me to leave my current job....Needless to say nothing about the job sounded like it was all that great based on what the HR manager was telling me. So I declined the job

A few weeks later at my current job they told us that the plant would be closing so I emailed the recruiter and told him this and said I was interested in continuing the interview process....I was not expecting Tamko to say yes but they did.....Guess they couldnt find anyone qualified??

So I went and did a one on one interview with the plant manager and the HR manager. It was about a 45 minute interview with the standard run of the mill questions..describe yourself, strengths and weaknesses, etc.... I believe there were three people that were asked for this first in person interview. I was the only one selected back for the next round of interviews.

So a week later I go on the plant tour interview and they show me the plant and all of the machinery and tanks they have...it is a pretty impressive process and they have some very new equipment. From the plant tour it was apparrent they are very data driven. They collect data on everything. I felt as if they collected too much data and would have no one to sit and process it. Anways after the tour we went back in the office and they asked me what I thought, what I say, etc.... I told them I thought the process was very cool, very automated, clean, etc.....but then plant manager dropped the bomb I had been waiting for every since I heard the job paid well.......the working hours would be 7am-6pm with weekend work about once a month.

So I discussed with the wife and she said she would rather us be poor than me work that much.

Next day I called the recruiter and told him no thanks.

Interview Question – During the phone interview they ask you what you would do if you wanted to move a piece of equipment to one spot and the plant manager said no.   View Answer

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1 person found this helpful

No Offer

Neutral Experience

Average Interview

Automation Engineer Interview

Automation Engineer
Frederick, MD

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 2 weeks - interviewed at TAMKO in January 2012.

Interview Details – I initially learned of this job from an MRI recruiter. I had a phone screen with the HR manager, who asked general type questions. The topic of 6 Sigma was mentioned several times as was that the senior management had a military background and tend to be opinionated. Of the 37 minutes the phone call lasted, 73% of it consisted of me answering questions, which tells me that at least the HR rep is pragmatic. Despite my reservations regarding 6 Sigma and ex-military types, I agreed to an in person interview. Somewhere along the line, I was told that the salary range was $80-$100 which is right in line with the job and area.

On the day of the interview, I arrived an hour early, due to the fact that the recruiter gave me the wrong time. In retrospect, I think this was done intentionally to ensure that I wasn't late, since it was a 45 mile drive in Maryland traffic. Regardless, the HR rep accommodated me, and had me fill out paper work to occupy the time. I was also informed that this was an all day proposition, which didn't do much for me since I was coming off a night shift.

At this point, I'm afraid I must be vague to protect the "innocent." Let it suffice to say that one of the managers tasked with interviewing me slipped and hinted at their displeasure with senior management and 6 Sigma. My current employer is still purging the ex-military managers that they acquired in a hiring frenzy 5 years ago, so I was sympathetic to the manager's complaints. My experience with ex-military officers is that they don't transition well into business, due to the fact that they have to deal with real budgets, competition, and efficiency, whereas these are non-issues in the service. Additionally, ex-military, salaried types tend to think in absolutes--everything is black or white, and, unfortunately, most successful businesses live in the gray area. Regardless, I pressed the manager shamelessly and much of what I guessed was confirmed. The plant succeeded despite senior management, not because of it. Also, as most of the world has already found out the hard way, 6 Sigma is a wasteful boondoggle and it's practitioners are consummate BS artists. However, since everything is black and white at Tamko, they don't use the restroom without doing a 6 Sigma study. Thus, I prodded the manager into admitting that they had become proficient in cooking the data to get to the right solution and that 6 Sigma projects had turned into political nightmares and popularity contests. Been there, done that, never again.

I didn't stay for the entire interview and begged off with an excuse about the job being "not technical enough." The HR rep was unhappy, but seemed to understand my point about not wasting any more of their time or mine. As for the recruiter, I didn't really care what she thought since I'm certain she knew the place was a train wreck, but kept that knowledge to herself. I am grateful to the manager that had the stones to tell me the truth and hope that they find their way to a better place.

Interview Question – I was given a basic AutoCAD test where I was told to make a circle of a specified diameter and then construct a tangent line.   Answer Question

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No Offer

Positive Experience

Easy Interview

Plant Maintenance Director Interview

Plant Maintenance Director

I applied through a recruiter and the process took 2 days - interviewed at TAMKO in April 2010.

Interview Details – The initial interview with the corporate HR representative went very well. This interviewer was highly in my court for the position. He recognized some issues at the local plant that he believed I could be of assistance with. Once the process was handed off to the local operation I believe that I was perceived as a threat to some of the local management. Subsequently I was not called back for a third round of interviews.

Interview Question – Why are you leaving your current employer?   View Answer

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