ThoughtWorks

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ThoughtWorks Junior Consultant Interview Questions

Updated Dec 4, 2014
Updated Dec 4, 2014
29 Interview Reviews

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Junior Consultant Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Anonymous Interview Candidate
Interview Details

Really long and unnecessary interview process. You will need to complete a coding challenge. My advice would be not to choose the routes problem--it takes much too long and I don't think it even helps move you forward much as the other problems are much easier. Also needed to fill out a long survey with behavioral questions, then have another interview with the recruiter before moving on to the final round. I chose not to move forward in their process after that as I was not extremely interested in the company.

Interview Questions
No Offer

Other Interview Reviews for ThoughtWorks

  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 3+ monthsinterviewed at ThoughtWorks.

    Interview Details

    I initially found out about ThoughtWorks through a LinkedIn search. I applied on their website and I received a response within about a month. After they first contacted me back, they made me complete two assignments: a coding assignment and a questionnaire.

    The coding assignment is as difficult or as hard as you want it to be. Being the overachiever I am, I chose the hardest one which was a train path optimization solver. They also had another one which I think was a simple sales tax calculator. I would advise NOT to doing the trains problem - it took a long time and it didn't seem to boost my application in any way.

    One thing about their recruitment process is that it takes an extremely long time; multiply whatever timeline they give you by 3x. They said they would contact me back in less than 2 weeks but it took them at least a month and a half before they asked me to do the phone screen. The phone screen is pretty straightforward, they ask you why you want to be a software developer and work at ThoughtWorks. Be ready to tell them what programming you have done. They also ask you here about where you want to live after the initial year in Chicago. I told them I was flexible, but I think they wanted a more concrete answer. They also pressured me into giving them a salary expectation here. While I thought I did well on the phone interview, they told me a few weeks after they "did not have a position matching my skills".

    All in all, this is certainly the most complex and lengthy hiring process I have come across. I hear that they hire a lot of non-programming types/art majors. Apparently at least enough to warrant sending everyone to India for 5 weeks to learn basic programming. I'm not exactly sure why I didn't get hired - maybe my technical skills were TOO strong. I don't know what kind of people they are aiming to hire, but if you are skilled at multiple things and at the top of your class you may want to look elsewhere.

    Interview Questions
    • Why do you want to be a software developer? Why do you want to work here?   Answer Question
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview
  2.  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeksinterviewed at ThoughtWorks in February 2014.

    Interview Details

    Very lengthy and disorganized. Equal parts culture fit and testing for development practices they adhere to (pair programming, TDD, agile, etc.). Video conference throughout the entire process (international office), with more than 5 people involved.

    Interview Questions
    • The "logic test" was bizarre, but probably the actual coding challenge was the hardest part, as it is intended to be.   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    They do not negotiate at all.
    Accepted Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview
  3. 4 people found this helpful  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Chicago, IL
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Chicago, IL
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2 daysinterviewed at ThoughtWorks in December 2013.

    Interview Details

    The process took well over 2 months in total. I first applied through the LinkedIn Jobs Board. I was contacted by one of their "Talent Scouts" via email with a lot of information about the company. Also included was a questionnaire and a programming test; both were fairly straight forward. The questionnaire had questions like, "What is one thing you have taught yourself during your own free time," or "You have been appointed Ruler of the World. What are the 5 most important things you will do while ruler?" The programming test had 3 questions and allowed you to choose and develop one in any of the three listed languages (Java, Ruby, and C#). I personally wrote my solution in C# because I had been using C++ for the past 2 years, however, the company mainly has projects that use Java and Ruby on Rails.

    After I had submitted both the questionnaire and programming test, it was a long process of waiting to hear back. I sent a follow up email about 2-3 weeks after submitting the questionnaire and test just to check if I was still being considered for a position. They emailed me a week later asking what day the following week would be best for a phone interview. As others have posted on here, the phone interview is a personal discussion about your desires and aspirations for the future and for working with ThoughtWorks. They are also looking to see if you keep yourself busy by your own free will. They have something within the company called "The Beach" which is where all idle workers go to stay busy with personal work or helping on other projects.

    It took a week and a half to hear back, but I finally was told that I made it through to the in-person, 2 day interview process. This process was really laid back. I never felt nervous at any point, even during the technical interviews. Be warned, if you think you're right for the job because you have a background in Comp Sci, then you are in for a shock. This company is very reliant on "equal opportunity" and they bring in anyone. I had people with backgrounds ranging from economics to education without any Comp Sci degree or experience apart from the Dev Boot Camp 5 month course. They really don't weigh your worth based on your knowledge of the theory and concepts of programming. Be ready to be grilled on your cultural background and your social views. If you don't enjoy a more liberal approach to the workplace, then you may want to reconsider your application. You won't find many conservative minds at this company.

    The first day of interviews were more about getting settled in their office. Everyone that was in my group got together to talk about each other so we can more fully understand everyone's background. We had a discussion on your personal thoughts of meritocracy. This is where I had the biggest issue with the company. It felt more like entrapment than an actual discussion. They already knew the answer they wanted to hear, but they wanted to see how you would respond. You can discern the answer to the question yourself. After the meritocracy discussion, we took 2 assessments, the Wonderlic test and a test designed and developed by ThoughtWorkers. The Wonderlic is straight forward; you can find the test online for free. The ThoughtWorks logic test was so simple. It's very basic logic based thinking. If you can follow the directions and think through the problem like a programmer would, then you're going to blow through it in no time. I finished in 20 minutes leaving me 40 minutes to double and triple check my work to make sure I didn't make any stupid mistakes. Surprisingly, others didn't even finish which was quite astonishing.

    The second day was where the real interview process began. They give you a schedule that outlines what interview you have at what time and in what room of the office. There is two technical interviews, one where you refactor your code through pair-programming with an actual ThoughWorker and one where you discuss your education background in development. The education background technical interview also included a STEM presentation that you were to create with little time to prepare and then present to 2 interviewers. It also included a Tic-Tac-Toe problem which was very easy to work your way through. If you take the steps of TDD (Test-Driven Development) and make small, quick iterations on your AI process, then you should be able to create a non-losing strategy. The last interview that part of the day is the culture interview. This interview is very much like the the phone interview, but they ask you even more hypothetical questions to see how you will respond. I was asked, "What is one person you would not want to work with," and "What is one industry you would not want to work in."

    Interview Questions
    • "What is one thing in the recent news that has upset you."   View Answer
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview
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  5. 3 people found this helpful  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeksinterviewed at ThoughtWorks.

    Interview Details

    The interview process for ThoughtWorks is something that I have not experienced at other companies. I handed in my resume at Grace Hopper and pair coded with a few engineers before they reached out to me for an interview.

    The first step is completing one of the three coding challenges they send you in any language you choose. I didn't write any tests for mine, but the code worked and I was moved on to a non-technical phone interview with a recruiter. We discussed the company culture, how I felt about pair coding, how I felt I fit in the technological world. This interview really got at the core of who I am as a person, and on the phone I was told I would be scheduled for an onsite in the next few weeks. The recruiter sent me a questioner which I filled out and returned. It had some fun questions about what I would do if I was president of the world etc.

    I had my onsite in NYC with a few other candidates. It was two days, the first day consisted of tests, a group dialog, and a game. The second day was all interviews with the various teams.

    The technical questions were not too hard, its mostly logic and reasoning skills. The most interesting interview was definitely the values interview, during which I spoke about some of my answers on the questioner they gave me, and had some spirited talks about education, underrepresented peoples in computing, and ways I'd overcome difficult situations in my life.

    This is a company with a strong social justice mindset, and if that doesn't seem to align with you this may not be the place you want to work.

    Interview Questions
    • Describe your experience with gender discrimination in computing.   View Answer
    Negotiation Details
    They don't do negotiations for JCs
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview
  6.  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2+ monthsinterviewed at ThoughtWorks.

    Interview Details

    First, I want to say that I walked into this interview *very* intimidated! I was told TW has one of the hardest interview processes in North America, and I am by no means a programming whiz. I think what got me though the process was my interest in writing quality, maintainable code (again, not to say that I'm an expert in it, but good enough to have a sense of where my code looked wrong), and my moral compass being aligned with theirs.

    - Applied online, received an email a few days later asking me to complete one of three little programming assignments, and a questionnaire asking a bunch of 'random' questions (non-technical). The programming assignments aren't hard, but I think showing knowledge of OOP concepts and having rigorous testing is important.

    Just a note, for me, after submitting the above assignments, I waited about a month before the next step. I sent a follow-up email 2 weeks in, and they responded to it, but yeah, it took a while for the next step, so I wouldn't worry too much if it takes a long time for you, too!

    - The next step was a phone screen (non-technical). Pretty standard behavioural questions, as well as questions about social issues (ThoughtWorks cares about this things, it's important to have opinions on these issues that are aligned with ThoughtWorks').

    After that was an in-person interview. This process took two days.

    Day 1 (besides the logic tests, everything here was done in a group with 5 other interviewees):
    - General info about ThoughtWorks
    - Logic test (answer 50 questions in 13 minutes, I got around 39 questions before I ran out of time and started putting random numbers for the rest)
    - Logic test #2 (13 flow chart questions, these questions made me feel like I was debugging a C-array, I think I got all of these correct)
    - We were asked to prepare a little speech about a topic, then revise it based on a video they showed us.
    - Finally, we were split into groups of 3 and asked to design a house for 'pugs.' The requirements were split amongst us, and we were supposed to communicate the important requirements as they came up. My group BOMBED this one as we didn't communicate an extremely important requirement properly and ended up with a non-functional design. That being said, we were able to communicate to the interviewers what our flaw was and how that impacted our design, and how we would fix it.

    Day 2 (2 different ThoughtWorkers interviewed me for each stage)
    - Pair-programming! (1.5hrs). I explained my programming assignment, and as I explained, talked about some of the design flaws that I noticed and how I'd change them. They showed me some TDD concepts and helped me refactor some of the code.
    - Technical interview (1 hr). Prepared a 5 min presentation on a STEM topic of my choice. Got asked about some OOP concepts, design patterns, and was given a simple tic tac toe problem to solve.
    - Values interview (1 hr). Very similar to the phone screen. Standard behavioural questions, and then questions about social issues and my opinions on them. This interview was the most intimidating for me, the only one where I felt like I was being "grilled"

    Interview Questions
    • - What's your favorite programming book?
      - What is Composition?
       
      Answer Question
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview
  7.  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2+ monthsinterviewed at ThoughtWorks.

    Interview Details

    First step involved a programming assignment, after which I spoke with the recruiter, and then I flew out to the NYC office. The office was super nice, but they were in the middle of some construction so there was a bit of clutter. Everyone there was very friendly, and the culture there didn't give off any sense of a large corporation. In the first day of interviews I took two assessments. For the second day, I had three one hour long interviews. The first was a pair programming session, the second was also technical but we mostly discussed and did a couple (very easy) problems on the white board, the third was the values interview.

    Interview Questions
    • What have you done that demonstrates you care about making a social impact?   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    I am actually still considering their offer. I don't think they're open to any sort of negotiation.
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ monthsinterviewed at ThoughtWorks in November 2013.

    Interview Details

    I first gave my resume to a TW recruiter at Grace Hopper a year ago. About four months ago (beginning of the school year), another recruiter contacted me asking if I would like to start the process.

    The whole process took about four months, mostly because of the busy recruiting season. In the middle of it all I was afraid they had forgotten about me, but I sent a couple of emails just to keep myself on their radar and each time they assured me that they were getting to me.

    Started with a questionnaire containing "fun" questions like "If you were president of the world, what five things would you change?" Definitely don't dismiss this, because they care a lot about your views on social justice. A coding problem was given at the same time. You pick one out of three options and you have three days to do it. Make sure to write some tests.

    About a month or two later, I had a 45 minute phone interview with a recruiter discussing my background and passion for technology and social justice. Some behavioral questions were asked as well. Based on my performance here, I was flown out to San Francisco for a two day interview. From here everything progressed pretty quickly.

    On day one I took two assessments, one 12 minutes long (answer as many basic math/reading comprehension problems as accurately as possible) and one hour long (lots of logic, flow chart based). I noticed that another candidate was asked to retake one of these at the end of the day, so you need to do well enough here to have a chance. Then there was a group mock consulting session. This was pretty fun.

    On day two I had three interviews. First I was given an hour to prepare a five minute presentation on any STEM topic. They want to see passion here. Then my two interviews asked me a bunch of technical questions related to OOP and algorithms. I actually don't think I did very well here. The second was the values interview where you talk about the company and social justice. Passion and a genuine interest in some cause is important here. Third interview was pair programming with two developers where we worked together on improving my solution to the coding problem. This was a lot of fun. It was very relaxed, the two developers were really nice to work with, and I learned quite a bit too.

    Less than a week later I got a call with the offer!

    Interview Questions
    • Most of the technical questions stemmed from projects I had put on my resume. Definitely should have refreshed my knowledge there.   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    I was told that negotiation wasn't really an option for JCs.
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
  9.  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3+ monthsinterviewed at ThoughtWorks in October 2013.

    Interview Details

    I met a recruiter at the Grace Hopper Conference in Minneapolis in October. While there I took two of their tests, the Wonderlic test and a basic, hour long logic test. Waited about a month before hearing back from them asking me to send in a code sample (they gave me three problems and I had to choose one to solve). Once that was submitted, I had to fill out a graduate questionnaire which took about an hour. Be careful to think about your answers because I was asked about my answers during the final round interviews. After I had submitted both of those I had to wait a few weeks before getting an hour long HR interview with a recruiter. It wasn't much like an interview, and more like a conversation about your beliefs, topics you're interested in, etc. At the end of the interview, the recruiter told me she'd be setting me up for a final round of interviews in San Francisco. Went to SF, had 1 group interview and 3 interviews and a STEM presentation. The group interview was the puggle problem (I think a few other people posted about it) with people interviewing for all different TW positions (not just JC). Basically, the problem is about communication and optimization. The problem asks you to make a house with the lowest cost possible. My group successfully did this and our interviewer said it was the lowest cost she'd seen. The other group with us in the room decided to make a really fun house and not pay attention to the cost requirement and I think the interviewer was disappointed in this. So make sure you remember to follow requirements (seems obvious...). The next day, the first interview was the pair programming where two programmers come in and talk to you about your code you'd sent in earlier. They didn't have much to improve so they gave me an extension problem to implement with them. Both were really nice and very patient and helped me walk through the problem. Second interview was the Values interview. I'd recommend you're updated on current events and have a few issues you're passionate or knowledgable about. Third interview was the Technical interview. Pretty basic stuff. My interviewers were both pretty young and were both in the JC program so I got to ask them a lot about their work. You also present your STEM presentation to them. You basically get an hour to make a 5 minute presentation about any topic in science, technology, engineering or medicine and present it to your technical interviewers.

    Interview Questions
    Negotiation Details
    No negotiations allowed
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview
  10. 1 person found this helpful  

    Junior Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeksinterviewed at ThoughtWorks.

    Interview Details

    I got an email asking me to do a small programming task (pretty easy I think it is to weed out people who just claim they can program). After completing that I had to complete a questionnaire online. Next I got a phone interview with an HR person where we discussed my background to try to get to know me better. They also ask that you complete a couple of personality tests to figure out who you are as a person. After this I got confirmation that I made it to the next step which was an in person 2 day interview process. The first day was looking at your submitted code and modifying it with people who work there, a small presentation (5 minutes) and an ethics interview (they are big on helping to create a better world). The second day was logic + flowchart tests and a group activity. After the interview I went home, and a couple of days later they called and informed me that I did not get the job.

    Interview Questions
    • On the questionnaire: Congratulations! You are now the president of the world, what are the first 5 things you would do?   Answer Question
    No Offer
    Positive Experience

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