US Army First Sergeant Interview Questions

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First Sergeant Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
Anonymous Interview Candidate
Application Details

I applied through other source – interviewed at US Army.

Interview Details

Centralized promotion based on panel of senior leaders. Annual reviews, performance, education, fitness, and combat expierence.

No Offer

Other Interview Reviews for US Army

  1.  

    First Sergeant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Portland, OR
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Portland, OR
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3 weeksinterviewed at US Army.

    Interview Details

    This is a set interview process that is used to see if you even qualify to join the military. Unbeknownst to most people less than 6% of the population (within the age parameters) actually even qualify to join the military. Factors for eligibility include:

    Age, Physical, Prior Service, Law, Education, Marital Status, Dependents, and Testing are the topics. Let's go over the questions.

    Many, many questions.

    AGE: How old are you? What is your birth date? Where were you born? What is your social security number?

    Physical: Have you ever been to a doctor? Have you ever been hospitalized? Have you ever seen a counselor? Any broken bones? Have you ever had surgery? Are you now or have you ever been on medication? How much do you weigh? How tall are you? When was the last time you did illegal drugs? When was the last time you took prescribed medication? What kind of drugs medications?

    Prior Service: Have you ever been a Reserve or Active member of any of the military branches? Have you ever been a member of a foreign service? Have you ever been in the national guard? Boyscouts? Are you a Eagle Scout? Naval Sea Cadets? Civil Air Patrol? Do you have the Billy Mitchell Award?

    Law: Have you ever been arrested, charged, cited, held and/or convicted of any law violation to include juvenile, by an law enforcement agency to include school officials or police-regardless of whether those charges were dismissed, expunged, sealed, set aside, thrown out, continued without a finding? Have you ever been to court as the accused? Have you ever been to civil court?

    Education: Did you graduate high school? Are you a junior or senior in High School? Do you have a GED? Are you currently enrolled in college? How many credits? When did you graduate? DO you plan to graduate? What is the date of your graduation? Do you have a degree? What level of degree do you have? What is that degree in? Do you have professional or trade certifications?

    Married: Are you currently married? Ever been married? When is your anniversary? Are you engaged to be married? Do you have plans on getting married in the next 2-8 months?

    Dependents: Is anyone legally, morally, or financially dependent upon you for support? Any kids? Any step-children? Any children on the way?

    Testing: Have you ever taken the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)? When? Where? What was your score? Would you be interested in taking the ASVAB?

    Interview Questions
    • Have you ever been arrested, charged, cited, held and/or convicted of any law violation to include juvenile, by an law enforcement agency to include school officials or police-regardless of whether those charges were dismissed, expunged, sealed, set aside, thrown out, continued without a finding? Have you ever been to court as the accused? Have you ever been to civil court?   View Answer
    Negotiation Details
    Negotiating Your Army Contract

    Negotiating with a military recruiter is something that most new recruits don’t bother to do, or at least not to the extent that they should. Someone interested in joining the Military will either find or be found by a recruiter and are quickly swept up in the process and are signing that contract before they realize what has happened. A new recruit will feel that as long as they get a cool Army career and cool training, that they’ve gotten all they want and they won’t attempt to negotiate for anything better. It is absolutely important that you take the process seriously, negotiate with the Army recruiter, and take your time!

    If you are considering joining the Army the first thing you must realize is that the recruiter wants you to sign up regardless. The recruiter (unless he or she is just a good person through and through) isn’t acting in your best interest and will attempt to get you signed up as quickly as possible and will tell you whatever they can in order to accomplish that goal. Recruiters are held to quotas, which they must meet and there’s a good deal of pride on the part of the recruiter who’s able to sign up a large number of people. There are exceptions to this, of course. If you aren’t good Army material for medical, psychological, or mental reasons then the recruiter will likely tell you that you just aren’t suitable. However, if you are only out of shape physically or have little or no job experience, the recruiter can work with that and prepare you for the Army.

    Assuming that you are suitable Army material, you want to make sure that you get the best training possible and that you get the job you really want. The first thing you need to do is research. You can talk to a recruiter first if you want, but don’t commit to anything until you’ve done research. Ask the recruiter for material to look over and to show to your family. Recruiters have many resources available to new recruits, all with the goal of getting you to sign up. But don’t just read up on information provided by the Army alone. You must go a little bit further to get a better idea of what you’re getting into. Do research on the internet, read books, and talk to anyone and everyone you can that has been in the Army to find out what it is really like. Make sure you talk to someone that has been in the Army recently though, as the Army has changed a lot from the days that your uncle Fred got drafted for the Vietnam War. If you don’t know anyone that was in the Army in the field you are interested in, ask the recruiter to find someone for you to talk to. Guaranteed the recruiter knows someone in the Army that’s in the job you are interested in.

    Once you have determined the job or jobs that you are interested in, talk to your family and friends about it. Tell them what you’ve found out and get their opinions. It’s true that you don’t need their consent to join, but it sure does help when you have someone to write/call back home. You never know when your family and friends will have some helpful insight in making your decision. Make sure that your loved ones realize what you’re getting into and that their expectations are realistic. Explain to them the process that you’ll have to go through to join, the amount of time you’ll have to spend in training, how often you’ll get to come back home, and the possibility that you’ll be deployed. The last thing you want is to deal with family issues during training because Mom and Dad don’t realize that you just can’t come home to visit or even call them on a regular basis.
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview
  2.  

    First Sergeant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Colorado Springs, CO
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Colorado Springs, CO
    Application Details

    I applied through an employee referral – interviewed at US Army in January 2012.

    Interview Details

    Must have outstanding leadership skills

    Interview Questions
    • Very time consuming and must have good communication skills   Answer Question
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
  3.  

    First Sergeant Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Fort Bragg, NC
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Fort Bragg, NC
    Application Details

    I applied through other source. The process took a dayinterviewed at US Army in January 2011.

    Interview Details

    This is neither, it is a position that is granted by both the command sergeant major and the battalion commander who will determine if you qualify and have the competence to lead Soldiers into combat. If selected there is a 24 month requirement to say on as the senior enlisted advisor before you can move onto another position.

    Interview Questions
    • Most difficult aspect of the job is dealing with the unexpected. There are many situations that may arise that will have to be delt with in a timely and expedient manner.   Answer Question
    Negotiation Details
    no nagotiation, had to take the job!
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

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