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Uniqlo Usa UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program Interview Questions & Reviews

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UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program Interview

UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program

I applied online and the process took 4+ weeks - interviewed at Uniqlo Usa.

Interview Details – I applied for the UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program in San Francisco. There were three steps in the interview process.

(1) Skype interview with UNIQLO recruiter. She was really nice and informative. There were 2-3 basic questions, which were the usual behavioral questions, such as "Tell us a time when you settled a dispute in the work place," etc. The only question that stood out was a logic-based question. The recruiter will say "I will give you a scenario, and you have to ask me 3-5 questions in order to reach the answer. How many jeans were sold last year for UNIQLO Japan? Tell me the process in which you reached this answer."

(2) A case study that took place in their San Francisco office (they pay for your flight). The interviewers are the HR Director for the west coast, and the Senior Vice President of HR of UNIQLO USA. They give you a made-up case of a struggling Chicago UNIQLO store, and they give you some statistics, such as the turnover rate of employees and the current state of the store. Because there were only 5 candidates there, they put us 5 into one group to act as store managers who need to fix the store, and the 2 interviewers acted as the Board of Directors. Usually, there are around 10 candidates that are put into 2 groups of 5, who then take turns acting as the Board of Directors and the store managers. They gave us 30 minutes to come up with an action plan and to write up a Profit/Loss Statement, and then we presented our plan to them. They then gave us feedback on our plan, and how UNIQLO would take action. It was a cool learning experience.

(3) The last part of the interview took place over 2 days in San Francisco again (they pay for your hotel). On Friday was the actual interview, which was with, once again, the HR Director for the west coast, as well as the Director of Store Development for the west coast. He is Japanese and his English is a bit broken, so I had to ask him to repeat some things, but other than that, he is really nice and quite funny. He had my resume in front of him and went straight for my past retail experiences, and asked me to talk about them. It was very laid-back and chill, and lasted for only 30 minutes. To me, it was the easiest interview out of the three. Then the same day, we had an in-store introduction to the San Francisco flagship store on Powell Street, and a store manager basically had us run around behind her and introduce all the aspects of the store. Then on Saturday, we had a full day of in-store activities where we ran around and helped out with the store, such as restocking, engaging customers, etc. It was intense but fun. They pay you for both days of in-store activities.

The interview process was long and tedious, but a great learning experience. My recruiter was extremely nice and helpful on every step of the process.

Interview Question – You are given a struggling UNIQLO store in Chicago - turnover rate is high and the store is dirty, etc. What will you do to fix the store? Must write a Profit/Loss Statement.   Answer Question

Reason for Declining – Had a higher-paying offer from another company.

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3 people found this helpful

No Offer

Negative Experience

Easy Interview

UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program Interview

UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program
New York, NY

I applied online and the process took 4 weeks - interviewed at Uniqlo Usa in December 2012.

Interview Details – There were 4 steps overall:
1. I applied online through their Fast Retailing website, and approx. 1 week later I received an email asking to upload a Youtube video answering a few standard interview questions. After 1 week, I received an email inviting me to a 1 hour Skype interview...

2. The group Skype interview was with 3 other candidates. The interviewer began with a broad explanation about the program. We were asked standard questions, including: "Tell me about a time when you had to start a difficult conversation in the workplace" and a math question which I have detailed below. She was unable to answer my question about when the actual start-date was.
A word to the wise: the interviewer WILL NOT accept the fact that you know how to avoid/de-escalate difficult conversations in the workplace. So think of something difficult, and how you handled it. After another week, I received an email inviting me to NY for a group case study. UNIQLO pays for the flight and transporation...

3. Firstly, the time had to be pushed back to 10:30am, because I flew into JFK at 9:30am and the interview was originally at 10am.
There were 2 interviewers. We were sat at 2 tables and there were about 10 people in total. We introduced ourselves and presented a VERY simple case study: The Chicago store is having problems and you have to work together to solve them. Brainstorm ideas, how much they cost, and their impact. Then you have to tell the other group, who pretends to be a board of directors. Another tip: mention cleaning up the store immediately. I also suggest smiling and taking notes during this interview.
The interviewers could, once again, not answer any of the questions I asked. They basically replied "Be flexible". About 2 weeks later, I received yet another invitation to NY for the final interview and a phone call. The call was for final interview preparation only...

4. Most candidates I met in step 3 were invited back to NY for the final. Some declined. Be early, because in Japan early = on time. On time = you're late. I met with one of the interviewers from Step 3 and a high-level Japanese exec. A asked the other candidates, and all our questions were different. For example, one candidate was asked what her strengths and weaknesses were, and I was not. I was not asked a math question this time.
I thought this went well because I was prepared for it by speaking with current UNIQLO managers before the interview. About 2 weeks I (and the other candidates I met) got uninformative rejection emails.
I emailed the interviewer to please provide some feedback (because I felt it went well), and was blown off with a one sentence reply.
I wish I could give better advice for the final step, but we were rejected for unknown reasons.

Overall, this experience was negative. This was an unnecessarily long process for ultimately below-average pay or no job offer at all. Travel times were stressful. The interviewers could not answer my questions about essential aspects on the program, like the actual starting dates. When I asked for feedback, I was stonewalled.
You can meet some cool people and travel was paid, though. Hope this was helpful.

Interview Questions

  • By asking 3 questions, find out many pairs of jeans were sold at UNIQLO's stores last year?   View Answer
  • Where else have you applied?   View Answer

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2 people found this helpful

No Offer

Negative Experience

Average Interview

UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program Interview

UNIQLO Manager Candidate Program
New York, NY

I applied online and the process took 4 weeks - interviewed at Uniqlo Usa.

Interview Details – I applied online and received an email about a week later saying they wanted me to upload a three minute video of myself to youtube that addressed questions such as: Why UNIQLO, Why this program, and Where do I see myself in 1-3 years. I did that, and then got an email saying that they wanted to do an hour long skype interview with me. I did that, and I was asked questions about why UNIQLO, where did I see myself in 1-3 years, and they emphasized that they wanted to be as transparent as possible- this is a training program to become a sales manager. They want people whose ambitions are to travel anywhere across the USA for UNIQLO, to be placed in their stores, and to aspire to one day become a sales manager in their stores. Personally, I am a soon to be college graduate from an elite university. I did not go to school to become a store manager. I asked her if there was an opportunity to transfer into the corporate side after the program was complete, but she said that it was a rare exception because their business philosophy is that its the store managers that run the business. When she told me I was going to learn how to fold clothes and work a cash register I had had enough. I told her what she wanted to hear for the rest of the interview, knowing I wouldn't take it anyway. I got an email about a week later saying that I had the opportunity to do an in-person interview at their headquarters, and respectfully declined. I don't know how they expect to recruit college students to work as store managers the rest of their lives. It's too bad- the company looks really cool.

Interview Question – How many pairs of jeans were sold at UNIQLO's US stores last year?   View Answer

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