VMware Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA

Updated May 15, 2014
Updated May 15, 2014
5 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied online. The process took 4 daysinterviewed at VMware in October 2013.

    Interview Details

    I was called by the HR. And the HR was asking personal questions in very diplomatic way, trying to get to know if I was married! It sounded very weird. Later had an technical interview and the interviewer didn't acknowledge whatever I was explaining, and mentioned I will be contacted within 4-5 days. Never got a call back. Emailed HR to follow up and never received any reply. Apparently the HR now is with drop box!

    Tech question: few complex recursive problems and asked the output and complexity.

    Interview Questions
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview
  2.  

    Sales Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2 weeksinterviewed at VMware in December 2011.

    Interview Details

    Phone screen, and then in-person interview. Discovered half-way into in person interview that position was not good fit. The recruiter didn't describe the position well enough

    Interview Questions
    • How do you move a deal along after the prospect goes quiet ("radio silence")   Answer Question
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview
  3.  

    Member of Technical Staff Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeksinterviewed at VMware in March 2008.

    Interview Details

    A recruited contacted me for a position with a specific team looking to fill a spot. Had a phone interview, then got flown to CA for a round of in person 1:1 interviews. Very algorithm based, problem solving, seeing if you understand how to code something. Very standard.

    Interview Questions
    • I don't remember exactly, but some standard low-level C/C++/Java questions. Maybe something about string manipulation, bit play, recursive algorithms, threads, networking, etc.   View Answer
    Negotiation Details
    I was able to negotiate. Compared their offer to another offer, with justification for the gap.
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview
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  5.  

    Engineering Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied in-person. The process took a dayinterviewed at VMware in August 2007.

    Interview Details

    everything from your initial communications with the company, organization and planning of the interview, number and type of interviews, and any advice you might offer to other interview candidates. Bonus points for your perceptions of the people, office, and work culture.

    Interview Questions
    • Please try to phrase as a question and/or be as detailed as possible about the technical problem, business case, etc   Answer Question
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview
  6. 5 people found this helpful  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Application Details

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took a dayinterviewed at VMware in January 2007.

    Interview Details

    At the time I had my resume posted online; I was approached by VmWare and requested to interview with them by phone.

    I agreed to take the interview and was informed that the interview would be related to C++ questions.

    When the interview started, I was initially slightly taken aback at the brusque manner in which the interview proceeded; not unfriendly per-se, but there was hardly any preamble before the interviewer launched into his series of questions. I wasn't terribly put off by the manner, really; this was a screening interview, after all... however, as an experienced engineer with a steady capability to land the job I want, I now view interview processes as a 2-way street and expect the opportunity to ask at least a couple of questions.

    The real issue I had with the interview was the content. Out of about 10 questions, not one related to C++, which was what I had been told; I don't care if an employer wants to keep the content of their interview secret, but to advise me of the content in advance, but then switch tack without warning is bad coordination at best, and sneaky at worst.

    The actual questions asked were complex algorithm problems, not generic problem solvers, but very specific algorithmic-related scenarios, for which you pull a known algorighm out of the box and recite it; essentially a memory-test.

    It became a bit ridiculous when the interviewer indicated that if I already knew the answer that I should tell him this and he would go to the next question.... So I was expected to, within seconds, over a phone, solve fairly complex problems that would normally take at least a couple of hours to review and solve from first principles.

    It was basically a catch-22 situation; If I happened to know the answer , I wasn't supposed to give it, but if I didn't know the answer I was supposed to, at the drop of a hat, come up with the full solution.

    It's a fairly standard process to present oblique problems to interviewees and see how they grapple with them; I do this myself when I am on the other side of the desk, but in a phone interview you simply don't have the time to work through hyper-complex problems that have specifically only one answer, and it is impossible for the interviewer to determine your collaborative capabailities; it becomes, essentially, a stress-test.

    Anyways, in the end I muddled through the problems; for the algorithms I didn't know I did pretty well, I think. In fact I pulled some decent solutions out on short notice. I didn't care if they called back, I wasn't going to accept any job there; I knew I would end up working with the interviewer and, to be frank, I don't work well with people who are inflexible in their thinking. They did call back about a year later indicating that they were interested in talking to me again. At this point I had landed a great position at a different company and was still a bit annoyed so I declined.

    In conclusion, for this particular group, and perhaps only this person in question, it appeared that they were filtering out people who didn't have robot-savant type quailities. This might not reflect the culture as whole, but it certainly turned me off this place.

    The lack of a follow-up email after the interview was not very kosher, either... I didn't hear from them again until they were on a different recruiting drive.

    Interview Questions
    • "I'm going to ask you a series of questions, if you know the textbook answer, don't bother answering and let me know and I'll just move on to the next one, OK?"   View Answers (2)
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

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