Atria's Restaurant and Tavern Sous Chef Jobs & Careers

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11 days ago

Casual Fine Dining Managers, Executive Chefs & Sous Chefs

Atria's Restaurant & Tavern Pittsburgh, PA

Atria's restaurant & Tavern is seeking positive and enthusiastic individuals to lead their restaurants located throughout the Pittsburgh Area The… Atria's Restaurant & Tavern


Atria's Restaurant and Tavern Reviews

7 Reviews
2.5
7 Reviews
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  1.  

    Spiraled downhill during time there

    Former Employee - Server
    Former Employee - Server

    I worked at Atria's Restaurant and Tavern

    Pros

    The co-workers at the restaurant were some of the best you could find, got along with them very well, some of which became good friends with to this day. The training program, when I started, was excellent. Helped me to fully understand the food and product being sold.

    Cons

    Upper management was extremely unstable in both the front and back of house (my restaurant went through something like six or seven GM's in three years, 10-15 upper-level chefs as well) and most FOH managers varied from lazy to incompetent to egomaniacal to all of the above. The words accountability, communication and adaptability became foreign concepts at its worst moments, especially when it came to progressive discipline. Led to a lot of unnecessary stress and frustration, and it became more of a job where I said "I'm sorry" to dining guests more often than not.

    It also felt like corporate brass had no idea what they were doing at times and would make a change in the menu or promotions just to backtrack on it shortly thereafter (such as overhauling the summer menu in the middle of the summer menu promotion or getting rid of or changing several menu items, sometimes repeatedly, only to bring them back after enough customers complained about it). It seems like they are more interested in treading water and not trying to adapt to industry trends (who eats pot roast in the summertime?). It's sad since this chain has gone from one of the best places for food in the Pittsburgh area to a glorified Applebee's with little to nothing separating it from the rest of the chain restaurants out there.

    Training became more and more of a joke the later I got into my tenure, with servers sometimes being put on the dining room floor not knowing the difference between chardonnay and cabernet or a martini and a manhattan. It might have just been the restaurant I worked at and the lack of attention brought to it by upper management, but it became embarrassing to hear about. It also became ironic because the company has a "VOP" perspective which places value and offers respect to the employee and customer alike, but more often than not upper management (and even the corporate brass) would sometimes treat servers, cooks and other "front-line" workers like subhuman scum.

    The condition of the tables, chairs, equipment and foundation became, and still is, a serious issue for the store I was at. More often than not, guests would complain about tables being way too sticky or warped, chairs being broken or wobbly, a roof that leaked and became loose in spots and heating and cooling systems that either were really inconsistent or didn't work at all. More often than not, corporate would do nothing to fix these situations.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Have some idea what you actually want to be. There's many reasons why the reputation of your restaurants has fallen considerably and most of it is because you want to get away by cutting corners and trying to nickel and dime the guest. Stop focusing on cost reduction and focus more on putting a good product out in your dining rooms.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook