BNY Mellon Jobs & Careers in Brentwood, England

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30+ days ago

Standish Senior Sovereign Analyst

BNY Mellon London, England

Standish Senior Sovereign Analyst (Job Number: 1408216) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and… Adzuna


30+ days ago

Distributed Appl Developer III - Java

BNY Mellon London, England

Distributed Appl Developer III - Java (Job Number: 1406638) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and… Adzuna


30+ days ago

Group Manager - General IT (Senior Technical Architect - Pershing)

BNY Mellon London, England

Group Manager - General IT (Senior Technical Architect - Pershing) (Job Number: 1408061) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to… Adzuna


30+ days ago

Application Developer IV

BNY Mellon London, England

Application Developer IV (Job Number: 1408052) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and service their… Adzuna


30+ days ago

Business Transformation Risk Specialist

BNY Mellon London, England

Business Transformation Risk Specialist (Job Number: 1409320) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and… Adzuna


21 days ago

Lead Developer (Senior Developer)

BNY Mellon London, England

Lead Developer (Senior Developer) (Job Number: 1411757) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and… Adzuna


30+ days ago

Performance Analyst 2 P&RA

BNY Mellon London, England

Performance Analyst 2 P&RA (Job Number: 1411169) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and service their… Adzuna


30 days ago

Client Operations Analyst I- Eagle

BNY Mellon London, England

Client Operations Analyst I- Eagle (Job Number: 1404160) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and… Adzuna


30+ days ago

Business Line Controller II

BNY Mellon London, England

Business Line Controller II (Job Number: 1410365) BNY Mellon is a global investments company dedicated to helping its clients manage and service… Adzuna


15 days ago

Audit Senior I

BNY Mellon London, England

of the team) Internal Audit's mission is to contribute to the effectiveness of the Company's internal controls by providing independent, risk-based… Adzuna


BNY Mellon Reviews

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BNY Mellon Chairman, President and CEO Gerald Hassell
Gerald Hassell
362 Ratings
  1.  

    College Recruits Beware: Not for young people with talents & aspirations (especially if you're not from Pittsburgh)

    • Comp & Benefits
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    Former Employee - Applications Developer  in  Pittsburgh, PA
    Former Employee - Applications Developer in Pittsburgh, PA

    I worked at BNY Mellon full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    - The new hire training program for college recruit was extensive; the company heavily invested in the training and the staff that takes care of the newbies are very nice. (the managers couldn't care less, but the staff that works with us everyday are the best part of the company).
    - Not a terrible stepping stone. You can get a significant salary bump when you leave this place (but then again, partially because this place pays so low, one'd expect to learn more from this kind of pay but no... let me cover this in cons)

    Cons

    - what good is the 3 months training when they don't pair you up with departments/managers that actually leverage these skills? we learned about java, spring etc, yet i didn't get to use any of these until I leave the company for my current job. They train you like a developer but use you like a offshore support staff.
    - the training covers a lot of topic, but mostly covers a lot of topic to a shallow extent. YET the manager i was paired up expect me to be able to handle BXP (the internal platform) like an experienced resource, when we covered the topic for maybe 2 days in training. (of course the manager deserves most of the blame for this unrealistic expectation even though he claim to have been misinformed, because even if we had spent most or the entire training period on this, a college recruit is not going to be able to develop on the internal platform like an experienced resource with years of coding at the company -- and frankly if i could, would you still be paying me what you were paying me?!!!!) - but maybe the training dept could've communicated with the future dept better on the expectations, or paired ppl better.
    ----------- which brings me to point 3, the biggest con of my experience, was by far my manager. this has to be broken down to multiple parts.
    3.1 When I mentioned unrealistic expectation above, I wasn't kidding. For the first few weeks I've been at his department, his instruction to me consists of 3 steps: 1. read it up; 2. figure it out; 3. teach it back to me.
    3.2 When he can't meet deadlines or things get difficult on conference calls, he conveniently "forgets"/"not at all recall" things that he has explicitly said in the past, and throws people under the bus at any signs of trouble.
    3.3 Ok this is half him and half the company, but I gonna count this on him because he knows how much (or how little) I get paid, so it's pure bull**** that he expect from me something that he should expect from someone paid twice as much as I did, be it experience level, willingness to work over time, availability late night and weekends.
    3.4 Again this is half him and half the company, but omg the politics. Office politics are everywhere, but at my current job, my manager deals with it with external teams and never once throw the whole politics bs at his own developers. my ex-manager is another story. it was just a pain to put up with the politics within the group itself. no one ever takes any responsibility for themselves (modeled after the manager of course), everyone always throws everyone else off the bus at the first sign that makes them panic for themselves (and they panic a lot). I know this isn't the case with all the groups in bnym, my friend got matched up with a very nice group - she learns nothing and does no development, which is why she had to leave before I did, but at least the people in her group were nice. ergo I count this one on my ex-manager still.
    4. While I in particular had an unfortunate experience, what I've found in general among the people from the training program is that, this is a job you might like if you're 50-something looking to retire. There's stability. But very little room for growth. If you are a young person out of a good college with aspirations, you might find waiting-for-retirement-with-people-decades-your-senior-yet-probably-the-same-level-as-you just a bit, what should i call it, soul-sucking.
    5. Pittsburgh salary kinda sucks for CS people in general. The cost of living isn't THAT low considering downtown parking or downtown rental (it's low if you buy a house - again, good for older people, not good for young ones). If you have a cs degree at a target school, go for any coastal cities, they don't cost much more but will pay a lot more.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - I'm grateful how much the company has invested to train the college recruits. It's just a terrible idea to train people and then not leverage the skills trained. This practice positions the company to be a stepping-stone.
    - It might be a good idea to distribute the college recruit to departments with growth, and with at least some younger people. At least have someone just a few years, not decades older than them. It helps if they can see where they will be in 5 years. Most early 20s people don't need/want to see where they will be in 20 years.
    - given that college recruits that hired into the program and not to the department that they'll be stuck with for a year (if they don't leave the company), let there be some kind of communication/interview process/selection on the candidates end to make sure that the department and individual are a good match.
    - might as well reject over-qualified applicants instead of hiring them into a mis-matched program

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO