Charles Schwab

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Charles Schwab Senior Manager Jobs & Careers

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30+ days ago

Senior Manager, Marketing Analytics

Charles Schwab Lone Tree, CO

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


18 days ago

Senior Manager, Field Communications - Sales

Charles Schwab Phoenix, AZ

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


28 days ago

Senior Product Manager- Online Services

Charles Schwab San Francisco, CA

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


30+ days ago

Senior Manager- Bank Platform Management

Charles Schwab Phoenix, AZ

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


1 day ago

Senior Manager - Product Management/Marketing – new

Charles Schwab San Francisco, CA

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


11 days ago

Senior Manager, Fixed Income Sales

Charles Schwab Chicago, IL

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


4 days ago

Senior Team Manager, Talent Acquisition

Charles Schwab El Paso, TX +3 locations

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


22 days ago

Senior Manager-Data Analysis and Reporting

Charles Schwab Phoenix, AZ

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


7 days ago

Senior Team Manager, Regulatory Communications and Forms

Charles Schwab Lone Tree, CO

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


30+ days ago

Senior Manager of Trade and Securities Operations, Investment Management

Charles Schwab San Francisco, CA

We believe that, when done right, investing liberates people to create their own destiny. We are driven by our purpose to champion every client’s… Charles Schwab


Charles Schwab Reviews

954 Reviews
3.2
954 Reviews
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Charles Schwab President and Chief Executive Officer Walt Bettinger II
Walt Bettinger II
565 Ratings
  • 2 people found this helpful  

    Great Client Focus, but handcuffed by the worst that "Human Resources" can dream up

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Client-facing Financial Services Representative in Phoenix, AZ
    Current Employee - Client-facing Financial Services Representative in Phoenix, AZ

    I have been working at Charles Schwab full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    A completely ethical, client-focused business practice geared toward providing unbiased financial help & advice to its clients. Clients compliment us for our openness and honesty, which helps with the feelings of job satisfaction. Health Plan was among the best until Obamacare forced the company to stop offering a "Cadillac Plan", but still provides good access to health care. Decent pay for a competent client phone services person. Four-week sabbatical every 5 years for employees is also an excellent benefit.

    Cons

    The company has gone way overboard with minutia thanks to "Human Resources" policy changes during past 10 or so years. One example is how they've crafted a mechanism by which they find ways to avoid paying bonuses to employees. It used to be that the company paid out a full bonus quarterly, depending upon the company's performance for the preceding business quarter. All employees were able to participate, and in a particularly good quarter, everybody felt a genuine feeling of achievement & reward for a job well done, which went light years towards fostering an environment that helped keep employee morale high. With the change fostered by the HR geniuses, the first three quarterly bonuses in the year are now considerably smaller amounts known as an "advance"; the fourth, paid out during the first quarter of the following year, is now a rigidly calculated, employee-performance-based amount, which the average front-line employee may or may not receive, depending upon whether you're in good graces with your immediate manager. The emphasis of whether employees fully participate in a corporate bonus plan has shifted from the company's performance to that of the individual employee. What used to be a fairly quick, efficient and concise quarterly review process when bonuses were disclosed has evolved into a minutia-laden process that now requires a 16-page document to explain why you might or might not get an annual bonus. The longer that document gets, the smaller your annual bonus is likely to be.

    And get this - if you leave the company prior to that annual "bonus" calculation, you get nothing, in spite of the effort you put in during the previous 12 months. The changes in the bonus plan payout implemented by HR have been front-loaded in favor the company at the expense of employees.

    So it should come as no surprise that, thanks to the implementation of Obamacare. employees who used to benefit from an outstanding health care plan - most able to enjoy the convenience of small co-pay instead of much larger co-insurance costs - now face a much larger portion of those costs. To its credit, the company has contributed up to $1000 annually to Health Savings Accounts for employees; whether that contribution continues remains to be seen. But in describing the changes to the company's Health Plan, one of the company's HR higher-ups mentioned that some employees may have "cash flow problems" as a result of the changes. Obviously, a guy with a 6-figure income has a different definition of what constitutes a "Cash Flow Problem" than the average front-line employee.

    And don't get me started on the invasion of our privacy in the world of e-mail, IM, and even outside social media use. Forget about passing jokes along to co-workers, unless you like putting your bonus, or even your job, at risk. HR-implemented policies in this regard will help keep employee morale in right in the toilet. Apparently, a sense of humor is not welcome in this type of HR-focused world.

    I'm baffled by a recent trend to hire managers for jobs in which they have no experience nor expertise. It gives off an appearance that higher-ups view managers as interchangeable pegs which they are then able to place in a variety of holes, whether appropriate or not. I see no benefit to employee morale from this type of policy. The team cohesiveness which once existed between team members and their manager - largely because the manager knew and understood every facet of the job faced by the front-line employee - is an important bond which helps keep an esprit de corps among the troops and has gone missing.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Listen to your front-line employees. They're the ones who actually communicate with your client base, and they're very adept at telling us what they like about what we offer. If you consider how much customers liked discounted commissions, access to a wide range of no-fee mutual funds, and expanded access to these services via our Internet platform as the years rolled by, try to remember that they came to us because they liked what we offered them. They didn't come to us because we told them to like it - such as the disastrous implementation of a multiple-tiered, multiple fee-based account option forced upon clients back in 2004, which then expended employee capital in a lame defense of these poor policies (which wisely - and thankfully - were discontinued).

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

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