Gigya

  www.gigya.com
  www.gigya.com

Gigya Jobs & Careers in Mountain View, CA

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30+ days ago

Client Services Engineer

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Work closely with account managers and customers to facilitate the… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Account Executive (SaaS Sales)

Gigya Mountain View, CA

of the Gigya Platform via phone and web conference to companies and marketing agencies • Flexibility to travel and present to prospective clients… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Senior Implementation Manager

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Manage the Gigya service implementation from initation to closure • Be the primary point of contact for implementations between the client and… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Enterprise Sales Manager

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Accurately forecast monthly and quarterly team revenue • Coach and assist individual reps during phone calls and on site meetings • Grow… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Sales Development Representative (Entry-level)

Gigya Mountain View, CA

include: • Quickly understanding the new social media technologies provided by Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other major social platforms for… Glassdoor


24 days ago

Director of Product Marketing

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Develop product positioning and messaging that differentiates Gigya’s products in the marketplace. • Sales enablement – communicate the value… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Senior Account Executive

Gigya Mountain View, CA

of the Gigya Platform via phone and web conference to high-profile companies and marketing agencies • Flexibility to travel and present to… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Sales Engineer

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Assist the Sales team as the technical subject matter expert for Gigya’s Connected Consumer Management Suite during customer calls and… Glassdoor


24 days ago

Creative Director

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Own the brand design and the look and feel of all assets created within the Marketing organization. • Maintain global brand style and… Glassdoor


24 days ago

Analyst - Marketing Strategy

Gigya Mountain View, CA

• Support the analytical needs of marketing channel leads through data mining, analysis and presentation of results / insights. • Build and… Glassdoor


Gigya Reviews

52 Reviews
3.7
52 Reviews
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Gigya CEO Patrick Salyer
Patrick Salyer
38 Ratings
  1. 9 people found this helpful  

    Please read all reviews with grains of salt. This company is going downhill quickly in its treatment of employees.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Sales Development Representative in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Sales Development Representative in Mountain View, CA

    I have been working at Gigya full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    -A great crash course in sales development, although likely not a sustainable method for doing so.
    -They can hire some great people in terms of coworkers you enjoy seeing on a day to day basis.
    -Pay for sales development reps is high in terms of base, although bonus structure is nearing unattainable for most.**
    -Change. They seem to try to change things often. This is good for growth, and can be good for employees. Many reviews here that seem questionable list 'change' as something you have to be able to deal with---this is true, but it is not an excuse for making poor decisions. Change is a pro and it is good, if done responsibly.

    **If you are considering working here, strongly push to be on an international or enterprise team. You will have a much higher chance of success.

    Cons

    -Work from home: very difficult to achieve and only available on Wednesdays.

    -'Catered Lunches': only one lunch catered per week. Snacks available some days of the week but selection is limited and runs out quickly. Compared to most Silicon Valley, food 'benefits' are lacking quite a bit.

    -Medical: Delayed start date for new hires.

    -Equity: Vesting period is a year. Less than 20% of new hires lasts a full year, thus most don't get their stock options. Even at one year, you only receive 25% of your stock.

    -Are you female? It's going to be tough. Sales here is a boy's culture--there are plenty of golfing outings and other things that you simply won't be asked to join. If you don't smoke, that's another issue--most of the sales managers smoke and there's a lot of relationship building conducted on numerous smoke breaks throughout the day. Women are pulled into meetings and chastised about their attitudes often, but men rarely if ever are.

    -Turnover is incredibly high on the sales floor, among AE's and BDR's who are unprofessionally called 'g-forcers'. AE turnover is high primarily due to an issue with sell-ability. The product is cool--it is! But it's expensive and a tough use case. The theory thus far has been to saturate the market with outreach by BDRs and AE's---this makes it hard for anyone incoming, as most of your accounts are beat up, and most good accounts are grandfathered by AE's who have been there a long time. Similar things play into g-force: you're getting a list that's been rather abused and is pretty minuscule. Innovation in finding people to reach out to is frowned upon--if you stray from vertical (even when asked by your AE), you're chastised publicly. Add to this a revised bonus structure that is based purely on what closes, and you can see why the turnover is so high. Oh--and a lack of respect for BDR's and a lack of understanding between sales and client services.

    -The company does work with great companies as clients--unfortunately we don't treat them so well. Many customer relationships are fragile at best, and turnover seems to be high. This can be frustrating when reaching out to new companies. Also, if you are in the midmarket division, it's awfully difficult to tell mom'n'pop e-commerce sites that they can buy what Nike is using as well.

    -Sales management is a joke. If you are able to become a team lead after you're a g-forcer, that's great! You'll get to shop, go on facebook, complain, and gossip quite a bit! Unfortunately, those things don't really translate to great team leadership. Not their fault though, they were promoted after only a few months on the job and are there to trickle down upper-management's wishes. As for sales managers--they work their butts off, but if you are not a selling favorite, it will be increasingly difficult to get the training you need and the help to get deals across the finish line. They're under a great deal of pressure from above and it results in a few people doing pretty well (these people are almost all those who have started nearly a year ago. A new AE that has started since February hasn't been successful yet).

    -Product support is lacking! You will work your butt off to get a deal to close, and it gets passed onto an understaffed team of implementation managers who are all pulling at least 60-65 hour weeks. Unfortunately, those people rely on engineers for support and Gigya simply does not have enough engineers to fulfill requests in a timely matter. In fact, sales has issues getting engineers for tech calls as well! The focus has been so intent on sales that the rest of the product support infrastructure is shriveling.

    -Finally, if you are interviewing for the Phoenix office, I apologize. That's probably a really poor decision. They aren't taken seriously over here and seem to be lacking the tools necessary to thrive.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1 - Concentrate less on posting fake reviews and more on actually improving the culture and process involved with the company.

    2- Stop referring to the role as 'g-force'. You are hiring, and should expect the behavior of, sales development representatives, business development professionals. Calling the role 'g-force' cheapens it on both sides--its easy to feel as though you're in a fun atmosphere fooling around and setting up a few meetings, and it's easy for people to not take you seriously as soon as they hear 'g-force'. If the company truly relies on the SDR team to fuel growth, treat them as the professionals you expect them to be. With respect, clarity, and realistic expectations and rewards.

    3- If you're going to promote people, do so with the integrity to pay them for that promotion. Gigya pays SDR's very high and is always on the verge of going public--or so the mystic culture leads you to believe. Thus, it draws in some really talented individuals from great colleges. They get promoted quickly and work their butts off, but see very meager pay raises above their start. Most don't leave because they 'need the experience'. It's a great way for Gigya to undermine fair value of work and keep very talented individuals, but it leads to a lot of resentment and will ultimately increase turnover. Do the right thing. If you want someone working 70 hour weeks, pay them a salary that reflects that.

    4- Close the Phoenix office, or at least the enterprise division there. There's no reason to have two enterprise divisions when it's such a limited market. The office was opened for strategic reasons and to show 'growth' but it's been very poorly managed by the home team in Mountain View, despite PHX working their butts off. An office should've been opened on the east coast to help with calling time differences, but long term strategy doesn't seem to be the game here.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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