M*Modal Jobs & Careers

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30+ days ago

Senior Coder

M*Modal Franklin, TN

M*Modal has been listening to customers through transcription and coding services for over 40 years, with over 3800 clients today, and is comprised… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Auditor - Coding Services

M*Modal Franklin, TN

reports as needed. •Assists in the recruitment, testing and evaluation of potential audit personnel •Provides input and advice regarding educational… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Help Desk Support Specialist

M*Modal Franklin, TN

•Communicating with customers via phone or e-mail to gather information on issues, troubleshoot issues with the customer, or relay solutions of… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Healthcare Documentation Specialist

M*Modal Franklin, TN

Responsibility 1 -- Delivery of customer ready documents consistent with the standards defined in the M*Modal Quality Program without over-reliance… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Traveling Coder

M*Modal Franklin, TN

M*Modal has been listening to customers through transcription and coding services for over 40 years, with over 3800 clients today, and is comprised… Glassdoor


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    Medical Editor

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Master Medical Editor/MT  in  Franklin, TN
    Current Employee - Master Medical Editor/MT in Franklin, TN

    I have been working at M*Modal part-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Work from home, set your own schedule (but once you set it, you're required to stick to it). 20 hours minimum/week. No benefits unless you work 39-40 hours (full time). Immediate supervisors are fabulous (and I've worked there a bunch of years so I know).

    As long as you work your hours, maintain your minimum line count and your quality, people leave you alone. That makes for great work/life balance, because you can log off and forget about work completely. It never follows you around. Which is good, because it's mentally draining work and you need time to recharge.

    There is a high job stability aspect if you exceed their transcription standards and you keep your nose clean and do your job and do it well. It's easier for them to keep good transcriptionists than to have to train a bunch of new ones all the time. But, you have to be good at speech recognition editing because straight transcription is a small part of the job. It's mostly editing you're going to be doing.

    Cons

    Lack of transparency. More and more accounts are being sent overseas, and the US transcriptionists constantly get moved around to new teams/supervisors/accounts to cover whatever is left. Which means one day you have a stable account, and the next day it's gone, without so much as a heads-up. MTs are constantly left in the dark. Everything is done via e-mail, after the fact. This results in high instability, and therefore difficulty making a decent, consistent paycheck.

    The supervisors notify you on Friday afternoon/evening that you're being moved around effective Monday. That's just terrible business practice. Almost every week I log into work, something else is different. Backup accounts change constantly. You have to do a lot of mental gymnastics in order to switch back and forth. I gave up months ago, really. I'm taking classes and will be leaving the field of medical transcription effective next spring (at the latest). It's not a field I recommend anybody to get into; unless you live in India, in which case, go for it, because that's where all the good accounts are.

    There is a 99.6% "quality standard" but I use that term loosely because the "quality" being sent to QA from India is well below that, which I find unbelievable since English is my second language, and my reports are always of high quality. Yet, as a reward for US employees trying to adhere to the 99.6% standard, their accounts get sent overseas. I haven't seen a pay raise in years and years, and my line count pay has in fact been lowered in the name of "we're doing this to remain competitive". Which doesn't seem to be working out since they just went through bankruptcy. So I was forced to give up my hard-earned pay for what, exactly?

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be honest about your so-called "standards". Either apply them across the board, as a company, or don't bother having any. If your true "standard" is "money" then say so. I understand this is a business, not a charity. But don't lie to people and make them jump through more and more hoops without adequate compensation. Stop burning out your supervisors; they're doing the best they can.

    Everything that matters with regard to transcription is in India. Including the help desk which is who we call when we have technological issues. I've never spoken to a US employee yet.

    "Be thankful you have a job" should not be the feeling you instill into your employees. But it's the feeling we're left with. People don't respond very well to being treated poorly. That's when customers leave, and it's when your good employees leave. Your transcription business is built on the backbone of people who make you money with every word they type. Treat them better. Or you'll have none left that will actually meet any sort of quality standard. Would it really kill you to offer your MTs and Master Editors 0.1 cent a line more every year on their anniversary if they're doing a good job? Where is the incentive? There isn't any. Except to quit as soon as it's feasible to do so, and to look for greener pastures elsewhere.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO