Pew Charitable Trusts Senior Associate Jobs & Careers in Washington, DC

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30+ days ago

Senior Associate, Research, Public Safety Performance Project (Performance Measu

The Pew Charitable Trusts Washington, DC

Our work lays the foundation for effective policy solutions by informing and engaging citizens, linking diverse interests to pursue common cause and… Beyond.com


30+ days ago

Senior Associate, Government Relations (CRM)

PEW Charitable Trust Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


13 days ago

Senior Associate, Government Relations, Oceans and Fisheries

PEW Charitable Trust Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Senior Associate, Pew Children's Dental Campaign

PEW Charitable Trust Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Senior Associate, Prescription Drug Abuse (Research)

PEW Charitable Trust Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Senior Associate, Global Shark Conservation Campaign

PEW Charitable Trust Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Senior Associate, Research, Public Safety Performance Project

The Pew Charitable Trusts Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today's most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

Associate, Election Initiatives (Research)

The Pew Charitable Trusts Washington, DC

** The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical… Beyond.com


30+ days ago

Associate, Prescription Drug Abuse (Research)

PEW Charitable Trust Washington, DC

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach… Glassdoor


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Pew Charitable Trusts Reviews

80 Reviews
2.6
80 Reviews
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Pew Charitable Trusts President and CEO Rebecca W. Rimel
Rebecca W. Rimel
59 Ratings
  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    Great People Doing Good things, But Not a Good Long-Term Career Move

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Associate  in  Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Associate in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Overall, these are some of the smartest people I've ever worked with. Most of them care deeply about the work they do. I can't stress this enough, and it makes listing the cons almost heartbreaking.

    By and large, the organization is doing positive, if not often groundbreaking work.

    The pay and benefits are generally competitive.

    The Pew name looks impressive on a resume and in networking.

    Cons

    There are extreme levels of micromanagement in some areas, even of professional staff in some cases. The level of trust is low, and therefore so is morale. The culture of fear others describe does exist in some departments, although sometimes it is more perceived than real, and I don't believe it is intentional. It's the result of micromanagement.

    The HR philosophy precludes logical hiring and promotion decisions. It's difficult to advance a career internally. Therefore, for many people, Pew is a stepping-stone employer.

    It is very difficult to get money out the door, especially if it is needed quickly. Some financial conservatism is to be applauded, but the arduous contracting process can often be misguided, especially when programmatic work is sacrificed. This seems to stem from Pew's move from a grant-making organization to one that actively works for policy change. The CEO seems unwilling to completely let go of the conservative grant-making mentality.

    There is excessive concern with organizational reputation/appearance, sometimes to the detriment of programmatic work. Furthermore, this concern is at odds with the constant internal change happening in an organization that is growing rapidly, as well as the change the programmatic work wishes to foster outside the organization.

    Very little privacy in the work space means internal arguments and personal lives occasionally become public knowledge (semi-open cubicle plan; no doors whatsoever on offices).

    I don't know where all the positive reviews for work-life balance are coming from, because I don't see it. I see a lot of overworked, stressed-out people. *shrug*

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You have amazing, creative, intelligent staff. Respect them, nurture them, trust them, and promote them, or you'll lose them. Don't let the revolving door culture continue; you can change it if you give your employees the credit they are due. Give middle management leeway to do their jobs; also give higher middle management reasonable signing authority. Take risks once in a while; don't be so afraid of controversy, because you'll get it whether you are careful or not.

    The CEO has been with the organization for a long, long time. She is very personable and well-meaning, but possibly too invested in the organization culture to see the forest for the trees. I actually like her and respect her experience and level of concern for the organization (despite what some here are saying), but she needs to listen to the experienced professionals who know their fields. Otherwise, she'll have managers who tell her what they think she wants to hear rather than managers who can help her make the organization more effective.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO