The Sanborn Map Company Jobs & Careers

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30+ days ago

VIGILANTE

sanborn's Culiacán

REQUISITOS.- ESCOLARIDAD: SECUNDARIA; EDAD: 25 A 40 AÑOS; EXPERIENCIA: 6M-1 AÑO; HORARIO DE TRABAJO: ROTATIVO. INTERESADOS COMUNICARSE CON LIC… Glassdoor


30+ days ago

AUXILIAR DE MANTENIMIENTO DE INSTALACIONES

sanborn's Culiacán

REQUISITOS.- ESCOLARIDAD: CARRERA TÉCNICA; EDAD: 25 A 42 AÑOS; EXPERIENCIA: 6M-1 AÑO; HORARIO DE TRABAJO: ROTATIVO. INTERESADOS COMUNICARSE CON LIC… Glassdoor


The Sanborn Map Company Reviews

14 Reviews
2.3
14 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
(no image)
John R. Copple
4 Ratings
  1.  

    It's a job. There are good sides and bad sides, just try not to let the bad consume you

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at The Sanborn Map Company full-time

    Pros

    Many of the employees I work with directly are awesome. We're all just trying to do the best we can with what we're given. There's definitely no lack of effort from the staff.
    The benefits are good as well, if you are eligible for them.

    Cons

    Disorganization is rampant at all levels, though upper management seems worst. Directives are often given to the departments without taking into account how this will affect hours, schedules, or existing workloads. It's as if we work in a vacuum and things just magically occur with no penalties.

    Additionally, jobs are never estimated correctly and never have enough hours and then everyone is yelled at about not hitting the unrealistic budgeted hours estimate.

    Training is pretty much on-the-job. Minimal training is provided initially and hardly ever thereafter because it's an overhead expense and therefore there is no money for it.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    8hrs of training on a subject does not an expert make. Time and time again, individuals with years of experience are let go in favor of younger employees (read: cheaper) who have been given minimal training on the subject and are expected to take over 100%. It sounds like a good opportunity for the younger employees, but really it's just poor planning and a desperation attempt to cut costs.

    Employee compensation is also a problem. Once you move up in the chain, it apparently gets better, but entry-level employees and even those who've been around a little while are paid peanuts compared to what they could receive elsewhere or even in entry-level jobs in unrelated industries.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO