AARP

  www.aarp.org
  www.aarp.org

AARP Reviews in Washington, DC

Updated November 24, 2014
Updated November 24, 2014
150 Reviews
3.1
150 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins
Jo Ann Jenkins
15 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Work-life balance was good and lots of good work could have potentially been done (in 17 reviews)

  • work life balance, growth opportunity and great benefits (in 11 reviews)


Cons
  • Many in senior management level positions are woefully inexperienced (in 6 reviews)

  • Very slow decision-making timeframe (in 5 reviews)

More Highlights

73 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1.  

    Amazing work experience

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Health Education in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Health Education in Washington, DC

    I have been working at AARP as an intern (more than an year)

    Pros

    Great internship opportunity. Good Networking possibilities,and great references. Great pay for interns

    Cons

    Nothing wrong with this company

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Great leadership and compensation.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Communications inter

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Communications Intern in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Communications Intern in Washington, DC

    I worked at AARP as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Great Pay for interns. Pretty nice Office. Nice people. the organization is huge so what you will be doing and who you will be working with is pretty random.

    Cons

    As an intern- not many cons. Some of the upper management didn't agree with each other on a bunch of topics making it hard to be successful in general.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  3.  

    A good place to work

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Vice President in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Vice President in Washington, DC

    I have been working at AARP full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Lots of opportunity to try new things.

    Cons

    Big and slow to implement change

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5.  

    A Good Place for a Soft Landing for Experienced Professionals Winding Down Their Careers

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Director in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Director in Washington, DC

    I have been working at AARP full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Lots of creature comforts for full time employees, great work/life balance, decent benefits and salaries comparable to private sector through most middle-management positions. Staff is very diverse in many ways including their professional backgrounds. You'll find a mix of DC policy types, academics, high strung business types, artsy types, creatives and work-a-day bureaucrats working in the same departments. New CEO has a good reputation internally.

    Cons

    Many in senior management level positions are woefully inexperienced. Long terms stick around and get promotions they don't deserve and the well-connected get brought by their buddies. There is a deep dependency on contractors and vendors who run roughshod over their AARP contacts, resulting in lots of waste, duplicated efforts, and time spent on projects with aimless goals. Organization is deeply unfocused, running away from its policy-based past and towards nebulous strategic efforts, that feel like flavors of the month (Life Reimagined, RealPad, CareGiving, AARP Studios).

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Simplify the organization structure. Get rid of all the dead weight in those huge departments that deliver nothing but endless powerpoint decks.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  6. 1 person found this helpful  

    Great cause, Lack of good leaders focused on that cause and its employees.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Project Manager in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Project Manager in Washington, DC

    I have been working at AARP full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Has the membership and money to move mountains. The new CEO JoAnne Jenkins is a champion for change and with her leadership those mountains will be just hills to climb. Change is in the air and that is most needed and there is great enthusiasm for this change!

    Cons

    Certain departments lack leadership. There is an autocratic style of leadership which does not motivate or inspire the staff. I have been here less than 3 years and AARP doesn't bring out the best in me. I feel suppressed and made to feel less of a contributor for fear of being labeled.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Respect your staff and build them up not tear them down.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7. 2 people found this helpful  

    Maybe not everyone, but many have been on edge for 2 or more years

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Vice President in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Vice President in Washington, DC

    I have been working at AARP full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    AARP, at its core, has a noble mission and truly is a do-gooder.

    Cons

    HR, Board, and Leadership need to communicate to employees. Rumors abound: "The New CEO will announce her team in Oct, no in Nov, no January." Or, "once the new CEO is in place this E-Team member will be fired or demoted, then your whole team will be let go."

    It is difficult to come to work everyday and put on a good face while being bombarded with constant rumors of your and other's demise. We need better communications. Very little comes from the top about "when" org decisions will be made. Niether is there an attempt to quell rumors. In this environment it is nearly impossible to keep your team motivated. The level of anxiety here is chart topping. People just come in, muddle around, gossip, and do nothing to pass the time until their fate is known.

    Also, not allowing VP titles unless someone has 4 or more directs, or Director titles unless there are 2 or more directs, etc. will get AARP crushed in the recruiting and rentention game. If this were a 100,000+ employee organization then this would make sense. There are only 2,300 employees at AARP, making this a ludicrous policy. There aren't enough Directs to go around. So people create roles that aren't needed just so they can have enough people to justify keeping their title. OMG! Can't you see this bad policy is driving bad behavior.

    Furthermore, anyone wishing to advance their title/career would have to wait until someone dies or retires. What ambitious minded person would join/stay with AARP knowing that after after 3 or 4 years of hard work there is no chance of upward movement. What mid career professional wants to be a Manager/Director for 15 or more years unless their agenda is to come here just to retire? The policy promotes the behaviors we should want to avoid. And lastly, it smacks of being designed by 50+ executives who have either been here forever, or who are on their 3rd or 4th career and who want to remain important (i.e. "senior").

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Membership is our greatest asset. A goal of "try not to lose a large number of members again this year" says something onerous. But It doesn't have to be this way. There are specialized skill sets and unique business experiences buried deep within the organization. These people are not "right" male with Harvard degrees. They aren't the usual suspects given the choice assignments [look what that has gotten us]. Instead they are of darker hue and extremely talented yet not allowed to shine.

    My advice to the new CEO and COO is to cast a net. Reach out and you will be suprised at what you find. Try it, before the "new" org is finalized.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8. 3 people found this helpful  

    Run by Liars and Cowards

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Corporate Relations and Strategies Manager in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Corporate Relations and Strategies Manager in Washington, DC

    I worked at AARP full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    A few good individuals work there

    Cons

    Age Discrimination, Race Discrimination, office culture, senior leadership, integrity

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop using African American CEOs to cover the discriminatory internal practices and hypocrisy

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  9.  

    Great organization; management changes have affected culture

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Consultant in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Consultant in Washington, DC

    I worked at AARP full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great place to work; great perks. Plenty room for growth. Talented and committed employees. Great cross-collaboration opportunities.

    Cons

    Inconsistency in management; connected, sub-par managers are protected; constant organizational change, not always for the better; renewal - after 7 years of continuous employment, full-time staff are granted one month of paid leave to recharge/reenergize.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Reinvest in your staff, provide clear paths for advancement; develop and strong work/life balance options that are available to all, not just at manager's discretion.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10.  

    Depends on department

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

    I worked at AARP full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Great benefits and location. Many dedicated and intelligent people. A good number truly believe in the mission of the organization and have dedicated their careers to improving the lives of those over age 50. The pay is fair, if not generous, for the area with opportunities for change and occasionally advancement. Policies for work and life balance are progressive as well as an offered sabbatical after several years of employment

    Cons

    in some areas it is a good-ole-boys area where friends hire friends in order to have the company pay them to play golf together. Unfortunately, those who are in favor are given far too much latitude in behavior and how they treat others. If one is favored and behaves badly, too bad for the recipient of that behavior. The response is usually, "well, she is smart". Far too much time is spent on contemplating how to do work than actually doing work.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  11. 1 person found this helpful  

    "Time is NOT on your side...No, it's not."

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Administrative Support Services in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Administrative Support Services in Washington, DC

    I worked at AARP full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    When you find a sector of the organization that's truly serious about utilizing your talents, recognizing your efforts and really investing in your growth as both an employee and an individual, it can truly be a fantastic place to work.

    Cons

    On the flip side of that, woe be unto you who have the misfortune of working for someone who shouldn't be managing a land fill, let alone an office full of people. It's a crapshoot - and your odds of "winning" are about as good as playing Powerball.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    At this stage of the game, there's not much advice I haven't already offered to senior management, and it no longer bears repeating, since it tends to fall on truly deaf ears. I fear that for THIS 'remake' of the Titanic, the iceberg is looming dead ahead, and well, you know how that turned out.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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AARP (Photo thanks to Flickr user Kenya Allmond, available under by-nc-nd v2.0)
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AARP (Photo thanks to Flickr user Kenya Allmond, available under by-nc-nd v2.0)

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