APAC Customer Services Reviews

Updated March 23, 2015
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2.2
247 Reviews
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James P. McGrath
60 Ratings

Pros
  • They are a third party call center helping clients with their mail order medications (in 9 reviews)

  • You get to meet a lot of interesting people while working here (in 4 reviews)

Cons
  • The call center was drab, cramped, and full of people that hated their jobs (in 20 reviews)

  • Incompetent management, incompetent upper management, high turnover rate there as well (in 12 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Employee Reviews

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  1. Experience depends on contract.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Customer Support Representative in Phoenix, AZ
    Current Employee - Customer Support Representative in Phoenix, AZ

    I have been working at APAC Customer Services

    Pros

    Able to work at home.

    Cons

    Low pay. The contract I was on was rather unreasonable and extreme in their policies for employees, writing people up for things that at most places are considered opportunities for improvement.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Look at what other companies are doing well and emulate that.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. Typical Call Center

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative - APAC in Rockford, IL
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative - APAC in Rockford, IL

    I worked at APAC Customer Services

    Pros

    Overtime available, Lot of activities and contests for the agents, Opportunities to move up

    Cons

    No reviews or raises. Agents working beside you for another client made more money for doing the same job

  3. Misguided Management

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Team Lead in Davenport, IA
    Former Employee - Team Lead in Davenport, IA

    I worked at APAC Customer Services full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    People on my team were fantastic, even if sometimes fed-up with upper management.

    Cons

    There was no direction from upper management. Rampant favoritism with team structures and bonuses. Management often rolled problems down-hill on the lower employees, often in terms of firings. Turnover rate was, no joke, 100% in our office.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I'd say actually get rid of the people that need to be gotten rid of, but that IS the management.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5. It was very. Dramatic

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at APAC Customer Services

    Pros

    Pay was good and benefits

    Cons

    Not a lot of interaction With team leader

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Listen to your employees if they're having problems

  6. Only work here if you plan on not having a life outside of work.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Customer Service Representative- Inbound in Davenport, IA
    Current Employee - Customer Service Representative- Inbound in Davenport, IA

    I have been working at APAC Customer Services full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Met some cool people. Full time work is wonderful.

    Cons

    Poor management and inconsistency. No one is on the same page and I often feel like cannon fodder. You cannot have a life outside of this place. I am a single parent and I cannot provide for my child with my time or any care because I am expected to be at work. Yet, We are given points to use for absenteeism and told that we can use them for situations like that. When you do use a point you are given verbal warnings and talked to like you just committed the crime of the century. The contradictions and the hypocrisy is astounding.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Start treating your people with respect. Be flexible. People have children to take care of and if they are a single parent with limited means of childcare, don't tell them they need to have a back-up. WHAT IF THEY DON'T HAVE ONE? For some of us we are all our kids have. I get told working a weekend is mandatory, but there are many that get hired and don't have to work weekends. We are nit picked down to how we access accounts and in what order we ask the questions to access them by. Every week we get a CFR meeting where we get told how bad we are doing. Praise is nice but when it's done in such a manner where we feel like kindergartners it's condescending. There is a lack in consistency. If something changes please make us aware of the change and then talk to us if we don't adapt to it. Not expecting us to adapt when we don't even know it's changing. Don't tell one person they can't knit or read or do a puzzle in between calls and then allow someone else to do it. So sick and tired of being micromanaged. Listen to your people. Take care of your people. Then maybe your turnover rate wouldn't be so bad.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  7. APAC

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Operations Manager in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Operations Manager in New York, NY

    I have been working at APAC Customer Services

    Pros

    Very easy to get comfortable.

    Cons

    Too many changes causing constant inconsistancies.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Take the time to judge your employee instead of taking the word of VP's that do not know anything about the people in the site.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8. Decent for a temporary job

    Current Employee - Customer Service Representative in Tampa, FL
    Current Employee - Customer Service Representative in Tampa, FL

    I have been working at APAC Customer Services full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    They are flexible with schedules, so it creates a good work life balance.

    Cons

    The pay is not that great.
    The metrics that you have to meet can be stressful
    Micro managed

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9. My leads were morons

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Member Service Representative in Las Vegas, NV
    Current Employee - Member Service Representative in Las Vegas, NV

    I have been working at APAC Customer Services full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    Overtime is available as well holidays and paid vacation time.

    Cons

    They pull reps from another department and tell them, they've been elected as team lead. However, the team leads go through the same training process as their team members, but because they feel they don't have to take calls, that they can sit in training and not absorb the information. So, therefore, when a question is asked by a rep the lead is clueless and gives wrong information, ESPECIALLY on calls where a supervisor is required.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    PLEASE, find quality people for lead positions. You never know, a qualified candidate such as myself can prob more beneficial.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
  10. If you thrive on verbal abuse from both your customers and your supervisor, this is the job for you.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative in Mendota Heights, MN
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative in Mendota Heights, MN

    I worked at APAC Customer Services

    Pros

    • My coworkers were great. They were very helpful in that they were actually able to answer a lot of questions that the supervisors could not or would not answer, and they were a great support system, because thanks to them, I knew that I wasn’t alone in what I was dealing with in this job.
    • There is an employee chat room, in which people can ask their coworkers questions and answer their coworkers’ questions. This is actually much more helpful than asking your supervisor, and it can help you feel more connected with your coworkers.
    • The scenery in the area nearby, outside the building, is beautiful. Every day, on my way to catch the bus going home, I walked by a large pond, where I would sometimes see deer and other animals.

    Cons

    The problems essentially fall into two categories: Problems caused by the client that APAC is doing business with and problems caused by APAC itself.

    Problems caused by the client:

    1. The store reps working for APAC’s client constantly mislead their customers about how much they can expect their bills to be, what kinds of contracts they are signing up for, and all kinds of other things. And if there is something that the store reps know is against company policy, such as waiving an upgrade fee, an activation fee, a restocking fee, or a late fee, they always tell customers, “We can’t do that, but call customer service. They’ll do it for you.” This is a lie and they know it. This leads to lots of angry calls with customers who scream at you, sometimes for hours, about what a horrible company the client is (or what a horrible person you are) for breaking your promises. Of course, you can’t tell these customers that you actually work for APAC, not the client, and it’s the client’s promise, not yours, that is being broken. You will be written up for this.
    2. When customers want to add a line to their account, store reps will often put that line onto a separate plan, or put that line onto a separate account, with the customers not realizing what they are doing. This often causes bills to be much higher than they would have to be and sometimes causes customers to get more than one bill. These customers are always understandably upset, but, again, we can never hold the store reps accountable for anything that they do.
    3. When customers return their phones to the stores and trust the stores to get their phones back to the warehouse, the stores always lose the phone, so it never gets back to the warehouse, and the customer then gets charged a non-return fee. And, of course, no one at the store ever remembers anything about a phone being returned. They always conveniently forget. Of course, we can’t hold stores accountable for this either.
    4. The database created by the client, which is used to find the information necessary to help customers and handle all kinds of calls, is extremely difficult to use. It’s very finicky. You have to type in the exact correct words, or the system won’t come up with any information. Because of this, it takes much longer to help the customers than it would if the information was more readily accessible, and then the customers get impatient and sometimes very angry. They start yelling about how incompetent and stupid you are for not knowing all the answers right away. And on top of that, the supervisors or “floor support” people start calling you out for high handle time.
    5. The client APAC is currently doing business with at this location has a policy in place of never allowing an agent to end a call before the customer is ready to end it, no matter what. If the customer is demanding something that is against policy that would get you into trouble, or something that just isn’t possible, and they refuse to accept this and continue to insist that you have to do it, they can keep you on the phone for hours, and you can never get off the call until they demand to speak to a supervisor or just get frustrated and hang up (and then give you a bad survey). And it doesn’t matter how abusive they get either. You are expected to take unlimited amounts of verbal abuse and can never end the call for this reason. Yet, even when these things are happening, floor support and supervisors will still call you out for excessive call handle time. And they almost never help with these calls. You’re expected to handle this all on your own. And if you ever do end a call on a customer before the customer is ready to end it, no matter how politely you do it, you will immediately receive a final warning. When you ask a supervisor how to handle this, they will tell you that you have to just beg the customer to please stop. Customers know that you’re never allowed to hang up on them or stand up for yourself, and this encourages them to continue to be abusive.

    Problems caused by APAC itself:

    Where to begin?

    1. No matter how obvious it is that a store rep lied to or deliberately misled a customer you have to “take full ownership of the situation”. This is a phrase supervisors love to use. They refuse to allow you to hold the stores and the actual client accountable for the lies that they tell customers. They also defend store reps constantly. They insist that store reps would never deliberately mislead a customer, they just don’t have all the information, and you have to go on the assumption that they think they’re telling the customer the truth (even though we know that they’re just telling the customer what they want to hear to make the sale). Once when I asked why, if the store reps don’t have all the necessary information, they don’t just tell the customer that and have them call customer service, she said that the store reps don’t want to seem uninformed and incompetent. So apparently they would rather just tell the customer something that sounds good, knowing that it’s probably wrong, than reveal that they don’t know everything, and we’re supposed to understand and forgive them for this. Of course, if you ever give a customer incorrect information, even if you’ve been given that information by a coworker or another supervisor, you’ll be written up for this, scolded severely for it, and told that you are putting your job in jeopardy. So there is definitely a double standard. Yet, supervisors also insist that we and the store reps are on the same team and we must never disparage them to a customer or to our coworkers.
    2. When you can’t find something in the database and you ask someone about it, supervisors will often refuse to answer your question and insist that you find it yourself in the database. If you say that you have tried to find it and can’t, and if you tell them that you’re finding the database difficult to use, some supervisors will try to make you feel stupid by saying, “That’s interesting, because I’ve always found it very easy to use. It takes me just a few seconds to find it.” Sometimes they will then make the point by looking it up and finding it immediately. Of course, they know the correct words to type in to look it up.
    3. We had to go through five weeks of training for this job, but because of the complexities involved, it really wasn’t enough. Also, due to system issues, the computers weren’t working and we weren’t able to get any real training until a week and a half into training. So we had to try to cram five weeks’ worth of training into three and a half weeks. As a result, the instructor rushed through a lot of the training and didn’t allow us more than a minute or two to ask questions. System issues are a common occurrence at APAC.
    4. A few of my classmates were very disruptive during training. They would often try to make others feel stupid for asking questions. When someone had a question about something that wasn’t quite clear, they would whine, “Can we PLEEEEEEEEEASE just go on to the next thing and get through this already?” After this happened a few times, others were afraid to ask any more questions because they felt so humiliated. As a result, we never did get certain things properly explained. Also, there were many tests to take during training, and those who finished the tests first would stay in the room and become very loud and obnoxious while the rest of us were trying to finish. As a result, I was sometimes unable to finish the tests in time and had to retake them the next day, so I fell behind.
    5. Team leads (supervisors) didn’t always have our best interests at heart. People who were obviously struggling and had some unanswered questions during training were periodically taken aside into the team lead’s office and asked if they had any concerns about how the training was going and what could be done to help them get more out of training. The first two times I was pulled aside, I said everything was fine, because I didn’t want to be considered a complainer. The third time, the team lead begged me to please tell him if there was anything that was causing me difficulty. He said that he really wanted to make sure that everyone was getting everything they could out of their training. Because he sounded so earnest and sincere, I told him that certain people were sometimes disruptive when we were trying to finish tests and tried to prevent people from asking questions. Not only was this issue never resolved or even addressed, I found out a few months later that the company was keeping an electronic file on us, which I had never been told about, and I saw that the team lead who had asked me if there was anything they could do to make things better had put lots of negative stuff about me into my file. He had turned everything I had said around and made it sound like I was the cause of the trouble. He said that I was holding up training by asking too many questions, when I had only asked a couple of questions, and that I was blaming my difficulties on the impatience of my colleagues. In fact, there were many others who were also struggling, but who were afraid to ask any more questions and didn’t dare say anything to the team lead about it. I learned from this experience that I had better never say anything to my team lead (supervisor) about any difficulties I was having with anything, or they would just use this against me.
    6. During training, we were actually given some incorrect information. For example, it was drilled into us that there are absolutely no exceptions to the upgrade fee (unless the customer is paying full retail price for their phone). But then I found out the hard way that there are certain possible exceptions. Of course, I was severely scolded and written up for telling a customer that there are no exceptions. When I told my supervisor what I had been told in training, she said she didn’t care. She said I should have looked it up in the company database, even though this was something that I thought I already knew.
    7. Supervisors would often put negative things into our files without ever talking to us about them. One supervisor I had said that I had given a customer wrong information but never told me what the wrong information was. They would also make sweeping generalizations about us in our files. If we made a mistake on one call, the supervisor would say that this was the way that all of our calls went, that we always did this.
    8. There was one article in the database, which I would never have found on my own, that a coworker once pointed out to me. It outlined the procedure for handling verbally abusive customers. It mentioned that at a certain point, after warning the customer that their behavior was unacceptable, we could transfer the customer to a supervisor. Of course, no supervisor would ever have told us about that. I remember one of my coworkers telling our supervisor how abusive a customer was being, and the supervisor said, “I don’t care.” I could tell that she truly meant it.
    9. Often, even after a customer asked to speak to a supervisor, the supervisors would refuse to speak to the customer. They started out with a policy stating that the customer had to ask twice before a supervisor would speak to them. Then they made it three times. And sometimes, customers would have to ask four or five times, because every time we would try to get a supervisor to help, they would just keep telling us to “position” things a little bit differently to the customer. They would insist that the reason the customer was refusing to accept what we were telling them and insisting upon speaking to a supervisor was because we weren’t doing our job right. By the time we finally got a supervisor to take the call, after the customer had asked four or five times, the customer was screaming. And, of course, when this was happening, we would get called out for excessive call handle time.
    10. When a customer was demanding to be credited back for a charge on their bill that was perfectly valid, supervisors would tell us to explain to the customer why the charge was valid, and then, if the customer was insistent, offer them 10%, and then 25%, but nothing more. No matter how insistent they were, they would tell us to stay firm on this. Of course, then the customer would demand a supervisor, and sometimes it could take as long as half an hour to get a supervisor to take that call. And then, the supervisor would swoop in and play the hero, giving the customer all the credits they wanted, making us look like the bad guys. Customers knew that this would happen, and this encouraged them to keep on doing it.
    11. We were frequently moved from one team to another. It was very unusual to have the same supervisor for more than 2 or 3 months at a time. And each supervisor had their own set of rules. One supervisor told me that even though this went against everything I had been taught when I was growing up, I sometimes had to politely interrupt customers when they were rambling on for too long or digressing from the issue being addressed, because this was the only way I was going to get my call handle time down. Just about the time I was getting used to doing that, I was moved to another supervisor’s team, and this supervisor sternly warned me that I must never, ever interrupt a customer or even continue to talk when a customer was interrupting me. I had to just let them interrupt me constantly and let them ramble on as long as they wanted. Yet, at the same time, she constantly got on my case about my handle time.
    12. Supervisors have frequently changed procedures for things, such as asking questions, without telling their team members. First, they told us to stay put and raise our hands when we had a question. Sometimes it would take half an hour or more for someone to come and help. Then they told us that we would have to go and hunt someone down because they were no longer looking for people with their hands raised. Then, suddenly, as I was going to find someone to help me, I was stopped and told that I must never, ever leave my desk. I had to go back to raising my hand. I was scolded like a naughty little child, as though this was something that I should have known. They also changed policies frequently on a number of other things.
    13. Sometimes different supervisors would give different answers to the same question. This made for a lot of confusion. Of course, if you told a supervisor that another supervisor had told you something different from what they were telling you, the first supervisor who had told you something different would flat out deny having said what they said.
    14. No bad surveys, no matter how undeserved, can ever be disputed. Even if the survey was intended for someone else in a different department that you transferred them to, it still stays on your record.
    15. They have just put a formal system into place, in which if your first ten surveys average out to less than 8.5, you get a verbal warning. If the next ten surveys average out to less than 8.5, you get a written warning. If the next ten surveys after that average out to less than 8.5, you get a final warning. And if the next ten surveys after that average out to less than 8.5, you’re gone. And they don’t take into account the reason why you got the bad survey. The problem with this is that customers constantly demand things that are against policy or are just impossible, and this often means an automatic bad survey, no matter how many other options you present to them. So you are totally at the customers’ mercy. They get to decide whether or not you get to keep your job. And that particular client’s customers show no mercy.
    16. There aren't enough headsets to go around. So if you leave your headset unattended for even just a few minutes, a team lead from ABAY (the group that just got out of training) will come and steal it. So you have to take your headset with you whenever you go on lunch or break if you want to be able to continue taking calls for the rest of the day.
    17. And then there’s the attendance policy. Each time you miss a day of work, even if you call in sick, it counts as an occurrence. If you get 3 occurrences within a 3 month period, you get a verbal warning, which stays on your record for 3 months. If you miss another day within that 3 month period, you get a written warning, which stays on your record for 6 months. And if, within that 6 month period, you miss another day, you get a final warning, which stays on your record for a year. And then, if you miss another day within a year of getting that final warning, you’re gone. And they don’t care how sick you are. They would rather you continue to come into work and get everyone else there sick than take the time that you need to get well.
    18. Also, going to the bathroom is counted as part of your break, and you are required to take breaks at scheduled times. When I told a supervisor that there were times when I desperately needed to go when it wasn’t time for my break yet, he said that I would need to get a note from a doctor saying that I had some sort of medical condition to be able to go outside of my break time.
    19. Building maintenance takes its sweet time getting things fixed. During my five weeks of training, the bathroom on that side of the building couldn’t be used because it had just been gutted. So we had to go all the way to the bathroom on the other side of the building. Just going there and back took up most of our break time. It was about five months until that bathroom was finally rebuilt and in working order again. Also, one of the sinks in the bathroom on the other side of the building didn’t have any running water for about five weeks.
    20. During the summer, APAC cranks up the air conditioning and the building gets extremely cold. Sometimes my fingers would start to go numb and it would become very difficult to type.
    21. Because the surrounding area is a wildlife refuge, they aren’t allowed to spread insect poison. As a result, the building is infested with ants. You won’t see them most of the time, but if you have a snack that’s opened or not in a sealed container, even for just 10 or 15 minutes, when you’re ready to eat it you’ll find it covered with ants.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1. Be more particular about the companies (clients) you choose to do business with.
         a. I was once told that there was a clause in the contract that APAC signed with this client stating that the client couldn’t be held accountable for any misinformation the store reps gave their customers. This should have been a big red flag, an indicator that this was not a good company to do customer service for. Choose clients who make sure that their employees are well-trained and fully informed of company policies, and who operate with integrity.
         b. The client’s policy of not allowing customer service to ever end a call with a customer, no matter how abusive the customer is, should have been another, perhaps even bigger, red flag. Your employees are human beings, not emotional punching bags, and no human being should ever be subjected to the endless amounts of abuse that your employees suffer at the hands of their customers.
         c. Remember, a happy employee is a productive employee. An employee who has to “take ownership” of situations in which customers have been lied to by store reps isn’t going to be very happy. And an employee who is made to tolerate unlimited amounts of verbal abuse from their customers isn’t going to be happy at all. No amount of free pizza or “retention bonuses” (bonuses for staying on past a certain date) or performance bonuses will ever make up for this.
         d. Also, before signing a contract with a company, check out the database and other resources that the company expects your employees to use to help the customers. If the database is very difficult to use, expect a lot of questions, and don’t try to make your employees feel stupid for asking them. It’s better for someone to ask a question than to just try to “wing it” and say whatever they think sounds right, at the risk of creating a bigger problem later because of a customer being misinformed about something.
    2. Remember, your employees are human beings, not machines.
         a. Allow your employees to use the restroom when they need to and don’t count it as part of their break, so long as they come back within a reasonable amount of time. Besides cashiering, this was the only job I’ve ever had in which using the restroom was actually counted as part of my break. Needing the restroom is not a sign of some medical condition, it is a normal, healthy bodily function. Requiring your employees to get a note from a doctor that says that they have a medical condition for them to be able to use the restroom when they need to is ridiculous.
         b. For heaven’s sake, change your attendance policy. No one can be expected to perform their job to the best of their ability when they aren’t feeling well. And you experience a much greater loss of productivity when someone comes to work sick and gets everyone else sick than you would experience if someone who was sick took the time they needed to get well. Most people will not abuse this. If you feel that someone is abusing this, you can deal with this on a case by case basis.
    3. Communicate with each other and make sure that you're on the same page regarding policy, procedures for handling various types of calls, and answers to various questions. Make sure that people aren't getting conflicting information from different supervisors.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11. itsokay

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Customer Care Representative in Greensboro, NC
    Current Employee - Customer Care Representative in Greensboro, NC

    I have been working at APAC Customer Services full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    getting the overtime, and some of then incentive,also i love working with the customers and helping them

    Cons

    surveys that set the stage of how you are doing, getting in trouble for helping with credits, also not be notice for your effect and knowlege, also favoritism when applying for other position

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    appreciate the rep that are always trying to help customers and wants to get ahead, should depend on the work and knowledge on who operation manager likes or doesn't like

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook

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