Advanced Medical Reviews Reviews

Updated February 28, 2015
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Vince Bianco
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  1. Excellent company to work for -- values its employees, strives toward improvement, has integrity

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Team Lead
    Current Employee - Team Lead

    I have been working at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    I've worked for Advanced Medical Reviews for several years, and it keeps getting better. I can't imagine working anywhere else! The management encourages us to express our ideas and concerns. We are given opportunities to develop new skills and advance within the company. My manager worked directly with me one-on-one to set goals and monitor my progress, providing me with specific training to ensure I would succeed. When I received a promotion, the CEO called me to congratulate me and talk about how things were going. No person is insignificant at AMR. Instead of shrinking our benefits, AMR has increased them over the years. When I decided to move away to be near family, I requested and was granted the opportunity to stay on with the company remotely. The management wants us to thrive and enjoy our work, and they make sure we have the tools to be successful.
    Advanced Medical Reviews is an exciting place, full of opportunity and promise. We are constantly working to improve our technology and practices. Every member of the team is encouraged to think critically and challenge the status quo. If there is a better way to do something, the management wants to know and is willing to make changes. I'm part of a company that is not satisfied with doing things the same old way, and the result is a fresh and invigorating environment. I truly believe in what we do and how we do it.
    Advanced Medical Reviews truly embodies its mission statement, “We believe every patient should receive quality healthcare.” Every day, I see examples of how we make an impact on patient lives. Our reviewers provide invaluable insight into the real-time changes in medical understanding, and their recommendations have prompted insurance companies to change internal guidelines/policies and extend coverage to patients that would have previously been denied. In my position, I get to work closely with our medical director and discuss reviews, and we specifically use the patient’s best interest as a guide when presented with options. This belief statement is not just lip service paid out to the public – it truly describes who we are as a company and how we conduct business day-to-day. I can say with certainty that we have changed the face of healthcare for good, and that makes me proud to be part of this company.

    Cons

    In order to be successful at Advanced Medical Reviews, you have to be engaged in what you are doing. This isn't a company where a passive approach will get you promotions and raises. I had to speak up about what I was interested in doing, and I had to be open and honest about my goals and areas in which I needed help to improve. It took time and a lot of work for me to advance--this is a challenge, but I don't believe it's a bad thing.
    While individual employees have special responsibilities/projects/goals, no employee is completely self-reliant. We have to work as a team within our own departments and across the company, and this kind of atmosphere/style isn't for everyone.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful

    A Million Trillion Things...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Medical Review Coordinator
    Current Employee - Medical Review Coordinator

    I have been working at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    - Regular Compensation ($12:00 - $17.00 an hour starting, bi-weekly)
    - Open Environment (no cubicles, easy to see others around you)
    - Wonderful Peers (and I mean wonderful. There are some real gems working at Advanced Medical Reviews)
    - Decent break-room (Free Coffee, Multiple Fridges, open PC for personal use)
    - Unique commute opportunities (Option to work remotely from home/out of state, if 'certain' criteria are met)
    - Generally flexible schedule
    - Little to no experience required in order to maintain employment
    - Occasional snack events
    - Quarterly events (Fancy bars, fancy food, etc.)

    Cons

    - Strong absence of communication
    - Little to no presence of management
    - Lack of coordination between staff members
    - Little to no organization/resources for information
    - Inexperienced staff (occasionally bordering incompetent, but to be fair you'll generally find this no matter where you work, even more so when considering the level of compensation/lack of training)
    - Overstaffing due to high turn-over rate (Estimated at 100% every 2 years within the Operations department)
    - Unrealistic promotion compensation
    - Overly transparent monetary concerns (i.e., greed)

    When starting a position with AMR, training is provided via one of your peers. The peer also has the responsibility of maintaining their own quota/goals, so the training seems very sparse. This does not reflect on the quality of guidance received however, as the assigned peer is very knowledgeable and helpful when available. The majority of the training is done from an outdated guide, and you will learn through trial and error (the peer will regularly evaluate your training cases, providing helpful feedback.) You are also assigned a peer buddy, to ask any questions that arise through training (which you will/should have.) Unfortunately my experience with my buddy was very limited, and not quite the resource it was made out to be (maybe don't have Team Leads as buddies, as they are constantly juggling their own responsibilities and cannot provide the attention a new-hire would need.)

    Your job will mainly focus on formatting cases (reviews) received from a variety of clients, and pulling information from the documents received. After the review has been formatted, you will assign it to a reviewer in the appropriate field, and follow-up with the case until a physician has accepted and completed their rationale. AMR is very lenient when increasing your productivity goals, so if you can type 40 wpm and have any sort of prior experience performing data entry, you'll have no trouble formatting cases. However assigning reviewers can be a difficult task, as they are contract employees. Although AMR houses data specific to each reviewer, it is very unorganized, which can make it difficult to assign the appropriate physician to a case. It may also be impossible to complete a case for a client, due to the difficulty of the specialty required / turn-around time. Your productivity goal does not take this into consideration on any level, and as the cases are picked up individually by due date / work-flow, there is a constant amount of cherry picking going on.

    You will also be assigned to a team. Your Team Leader will effectively act as your manager, monitoring your work-flow, providing information/ new practices through team meetings, etc. I was very fortunate in the Team Lead assigned to me, and was able to make the most out of the situation. However others are not as fortunate, and struggle to get by with their Team Leaders. The teams have no specific structure (literally), and the peers within them do not generally work together more so than any other peer within the Ops department. Aside from my Team Lead, I had virtually no contact or discussions with management on any level (aside from a weekly meeting.)

    When your productivity meets the required quota, you will begin training for an additional position within AMR ('Quality assurance' of physician rationale.) When I first heard this position was mandatory without an increase in wage, I was a little flabbergasted, as it is levels above the previous job's required ability. I personally do not believe this job should be performed by non-medically trained staff, as it requires knowledge of medical terminology and an alarming amount of cases do not get checked by a medically trained professional after adjustment (outside of the physician assigned to the case, who does not get compensated for re-reviewing any edits made.) This made me very uncomfortable, and ultimately encouraged me to move on from Advanced Medical Reviews.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - Properly adjust the evaluation rubric to allow for fair evaluations. If you don't have statistical data to accurately evaluate an employee, remove the area of evaluation or start gathering the data. At present it feels the evaluation is purposely skewed in order for AMR to keep their employee costs low. If you assign additional tasks to an employee, you should be prepared to adjust the employee's quota for a more reasonable evaluation, and/or provide compensation for the additional work-load.

    - Entice employee's with reasonable cost of living wage increases, including retro-active pay for all PR-1 positions. It is disparaging to see the amount of revenue AMR generates, when employee's are being 'considered' for 10 cent raises. There were times where I had incentive NOT to work, in order to avoid additional responsibilities that would not only increase my workload (without compensation), but would also put me further from a positive evaluation due to being stretched too thin/subjective evaluations.

    - Remove PR-1 as a mandatory position. This is unfair as the initial training has been previously completed generally 3 months prior and again, it is an increase in workload without compensation. If unable to remove PR-1 as a mandatory position, either provide it in the initial training, or be prepared to increase the wages for PR-1's.

    - Hire additional Medical Directors (or other legitimate medically trained staff). There is a scary lack of available resources in the medical department, especially when considering the level that PR-1's interact with cases. (This does not reflect the quality of the medical staff on board.)

    - Consider adding additional tiers to the case workflow ( possibly a phase that focuses solely on reviewer follow-up / communication, or even client communication. Pretty standard stuff.)

    - Hire additional resources for your customer service (CAS) department. Operations should not be taking on CAS duties, the division between the two departments needs to be..well...more divided. If opposed to dividing the departments, consider combining them. Start growing CAS to be a real resource for clients, in order to ease the burden on Ops. If CAS could properly/provide training to submitters, it would reduce the client contact necessary from Operations which would not only increase overall productivity, but should also increase customer satisfaction on multiple levels.

    - Set standard questions that are generated from the Requested Services on all cases. Remove all subjective questions ("As least as likely as not".) Provide training to employees on client communication, as most of the staff have never had a job before and are fresh out of the college. The tasks assigned to a medical review coordinator aren't necessarily difficult, but they are multifaceted and require the ability to quickly address situations as they arise. Most first-timers will not instinctively pick up on this, and suffer from a lack of guidance.

    - Create a legitimate training department/team, the current trainers are ridiculously overloaded with responsibilities. It's absurd to expect effective training while juggling a myriad of other responsibilities. If unwilling to create legitimate training, at the very least create a role for a "Review Specialist" that's sole responsibility is addressing various questions/template checks from Ops on a daily basis. While team leads are a viable resource, there are too many discrepancies that require clarification for them to effectively assist the staff while managing their own tasks. It is a full time job, and more than likely will require more than two people.

    - Separate the cases as received by clients, and assign clients to teams in a balanced manner. This way the employee's can better focus and perform the seemingly random weekly updates/changes. Consider dispersing the workload as it's received through the day, as opposed to a free-for-all grab'em fest. If a dispatcher feels a case deserves higher productivity, allow them to discuss it with their TL for adjustment. Adjust each individuals quota and rubric appropriately as tasks are assigned. Make fun challenges that are realistic and obtainable. It's pretty boggling that the void in management is so great that we're tasked with assigning ourselves challenges, and reporting them to the TL's. I mean...c'mon. You really can't even pretend to care? We barely have time to keep with up our actual work-flow, let alone ridiculous ideas like this.

    - Go 1 month without discussing/making MBT adjustments. We understand the importance of profit in order to keep a company viable, but there should be a limit to the amount of monetary concern you show to the staff. It can be nauseating at times, even more so when you're surrounded by young employees who genuinely work hard and are regularly cheated out of even the slightest raise. There is an obvious reason why staff chooses not to interact during meetings, please take the hint.

    - Remove the 'Clinical Pages' field. Regardless if a policy contains "clinical" information or not, the fact remains that the physician needs to review the pages in order to make a determination. None of the staff are comfortable with this practice. Not only does it feel immoral, it also exponentially adds to our workload in various measures. Please conduct thorough inter-departmental research before implementing critical workload changes.

    - Expand the Reviewer Relations department. Operations generally has 90% of communication with our physicians, however we receive sporatic unorganized feed-back, with no signs of improvement. A plethora of information is useless if not organized, and only further hinders Operations as whole.

    - Allow for employee input regarding events. The events should be designed solely for the employees, and should provide some sort of interactive team-building. I understand that the nature of our business does not allow full-staff outings during business hours, but there are work-arounds to this (e.g., individual team outings). 2-3 hours out of the office can make a huge morale difference, and considering the location of the business, there are a multitude of company-friendly activities in the area. (e.g., bowling, museum, movie, etc.)

    - Lastly, the Keurig is a terrible machine. God awful. It provides a pathetic imitation of coffee, and you should be ashamed for providing it. Buy an industrial size coffee pot, along with some coffee beans. Have administration make coffee (sorry admin, but people need their coffee!) It'll make a very big difference, trust me. If you need a legitimate reason to get rid of it, research the environmental degradation of the K-cups, along with it's release of microplastics. You'll get to be a champion of the environment, AND provide real coffee. It's rare you get a win-win in business, you're welcome.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  3. 1 person found this helpful

    Low morale, lack of leadership, weak culture, high turnover but it pays the bills!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Advanced Medical Reviews

    Pros

    Pay - Decent for any recent college grad looking to make more than your average retail job
    Benefits - Medical, Dental, Vision, 401k, Vacation all available after your 90 day probation
    Overtime - After your 90 days, you might be eligible for OT. However, this has recently become a con
    Work Remote- Great way to escape the bland office culture and formulate your own routine at home.
    Learn Medical Terms - If you're looking to be in healthcare as a career, but lack experience then this is a great place to pick up some terminology. AMR does not require you to have health care experience. Google will become your teacher.
    Work with Health Entities - You are in constant contact with insurance companies, physicians, nurses, etc. Again, very nice for someone who lacks healthcare experience.
    Growing Company - There's no doubt this place is growing and racking in more revenue. Opportunities MAY lie ahead for those brave enough to stick through it and maybe kiss some butt.

    Cons

    Office Culture: You will often see cliques and BFFs in the office, which can make one feel left out. There are very few initiatives to build camaraderie within the office, and company as a whole. When you come in for you shift, you'd be lucky if someone greeted you. Overall the office culture is meek, bland, and of low morale.
    Management - Mediocre at best. It seems some new policy is applied every week, and usually there is no follow up so people go on and keep doing what they do until you hear about the same thing again next week. Management is at the mercy of the clients, which force these random changes. Do not expect praise for doing a good job. Only a select few "positive people" get recognized for their work, which can be discouraging to all other 50 employees. If you aren't on the "positive people" list... does that make you a negative person? Perhaps neutral?
    Leadership - Huge lack of leadership. There is not one person that will fire you up about your job and make you feel like you're making a difference in people's lives. There's not one person that boosts morale. They try, but just because you're a manager doesn't make you a leader. Huge difference between the two. Upper management will RARELY speak to you in the break room.
    Holidays - Veteran's Day, MLK day, Cesar Chavez Day, President's Day... not observed. I am not sure if Labor Day is observed. I know it's healthcare, but why are some of your clients closed on these days? Oh and you MAY have to work Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years if there are a lack of volunteers.
    Peer Grading System - What better to kill morale than to have the person next to you grade the quality of your work?This is the worst, especially when you are fresh out of their weak training regimen. No one bothers to say "Hey, I know you're new and may not have been aware. But for the future, try doing this instead of that" This system can create covert, antagonistic work relationships. I have already made my personal list of people I feel graded me unfairly and when the time comes for me to grade their work... you better believe I will be meticulous.
    Remote - Working remote means you can get disconnected from your "teammates". There are plenty of folks you may never see in person, so you might not care if you grade them harshly for their poor work. I mean it's not like you'll ever see them, right?
    Overtime - There used to be an abundance of overtime available to everyone. Now it's only for a select few people who have "proven" themselves, and occasionally the rest of the herd can get some scraps of OT.
    Training - Very boring after all practice cases are gone and it is not very informative of the entire process. There is rarely any shadowing involved. You are not formally introduced to your "mentor". You are given the easiest cases to train on for an entire month. Once you are out of training, you will run into hard cases that are foreign to you. You might take some initiative to solo it, but that peer grading system will come back to haunt you.
    High Turnover - It seems every month at least 2-3 people quit the company. I have seen numerous "new hires" walk through the door, and quit by next week. I have also seen a couple of people get fired (adding to the low morale). This company makes you sign a contract that allows the company to fire you at will (no reason necessary), and you may do the same to them.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Acknowledge and get to know your employees more when you have a chance. You'd be surprised how far a "Good morning! How are you doing?" can go. Do not be condescending or rude, this makes you seem unapproachable. Low morale starts with lack leadership from upper management.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Advanced Medical Reviews Response

    Mar 23, 2015CEO

    Although, this site has been around for some time, we only in the last year started paying particular attention to these postings. Thus, Glassdoor is new to us here at Advanced Medical Reviews as ... More

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  5. Definite pros and cons, current work in progress.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Santa Monica, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Santa Monica, CA

    I have been working at Advanced Medical Reviews

    Pros

    The company is growing rapidly, so if you're good at your job and management likes you then there is good job security. Management has been working on their communication and treatment of their employees, so the work environment is constantly getting more positive. The employees here are generally really great people, so it adds to the atmosphere.

    Cons

    There is no room for growth, and management tends to try to get away with as little employee recognition as possible, making big deals out of small promotions/compensation. The benefits are average at best. The pros and cons are different depending on who you work for within the company, the CEO is newer, and he's doing great work at bringing the company back from the depths of despair.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep going, be more open to listening to your employees. Communicate! No one likes to hear things through the grapevine, come up with some sort of communication for when someone leaves the company, it is so strange that you never communicate this with your employees!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  6. Finance & Accounting - Interim Controller

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Interim Controller in Santa Monica, CA
    Former Employee - Interim Controller in Santa Monica, CA

    I worked at Advanced Medical Reviews

    Pros

    Great Culture, very supportive environment. The Senior Management and Managing partner really care about their employees and doing the right thing. Even though I was a contractor, I was treated with a great deal of respect. I never felt like I was an outsider. All the staff is very nice as well. They have great benefits, and the compensation matches much larger companies. They also have flex time and many staff work from home when they need to.

    Cons

    My commute was long. I would have stayed and taken on a career role had it been closer to home.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep up the good work!!! This company will grow much larger....

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7. 2 people found this helpful

    This job is what you make of it

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Employee in Los Angeles, CA

    I have been working at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    I won't pretend that this is a dream company to work for, but the job is essentially what you make of it. You can come in and do the bare minimum; you'll receive paltry raises each year and live under the thumb of your manager. Or you can come in and apply yourself; you'll either be given stimulating projects within the operations department or promoted out of operations entirely. AMR isn't perfect, but it is a meritocracy; the people who are the unhappiest within the company tend to do the very worst work, and thereby earn the strict supervision they are given. The company offers pretty decent health insurance, vacation/sick time, 401k, and the opportunity to work from home. Once you are trained and show competency, you basically work autonomously. There's always a surplus of work to do, and nearly unlimited optional overtime is offered. When you leave the company, you can walk out with a letter of recommendation from a medical doctor or two and tons of experience in medical administration.

    Cons

    Compensation could be more generous at the entry level. The open office plan makes the environment noisy and distracting (but they are fixing this when they move to a new location). Management tends to be cold. The executives treat the company like their piggy bank. The peer-grading system lends itself to antagonistic work relationships. The company agrees to timeframes with its clients that aren't realistic; when the operations department doesn't meet its goals (it almost never meets goals), morale plummets. Management could be more flexible with employee's schedules. Management has no real carrots or sticks to motivate employees; the company forbids financial incentive to do well (above a $5 Starbucks card), but also never fires people for doing bad work (incompetent employees have a way of lingering). The staff tends to be stretched very thin across too many projects. As an IRO, I am very concerned that the company cares more about quantity/profit than quality of medical review recommendations.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Let more people go remote; the employees who stay at the company longest and do the best work go remote. Refocus the company on giving high quality recommendations and advice to its clients, and take the emphasis off volume. Don't promise things to clients that you can't deliver on (e.g. huge volumes of reviews done in very short periods of time). Be flexible with employee schedules; employees take a long time to train and it's a waste of resources to lose an employee due to scheduling problems. Eliminate time-consuming department and company-wide meetings. Use carrots to reward good employees; use sticks to punish bad employees.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8. WORSE NIGHTMARE! I AM LEAVING!!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Operations Director in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Operations Director in Los Angeles, CA

    I have been working at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    THE ONLY REASON TO WORK HERE IS BECAUSE THE UNEMPLOYMENT LINE IS BIG AND WAIT TIMES ARE OUTRAGEOUS.OTHERWISE, KEEP AWAY THEY MAKE A MILLION AND ONE FAKE PROMISES.

    Cons

    -long hours @ less than minimum wage rates.. since they pay salary you cant tell unless you break it down
    -overcrowded, very uncomfortable work environment. have to smell each others sweat.
    -no furthering opportunities

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    keep your promises!!!!
    do not make so many fake promises to ALL of us. I feel like ive been lied to all along. very sad to see such a company with potential just get stuck and not move further..

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  9. 1 person found this helpful

    Worst company I ever worked for

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Medical Review Coordinator in Santa Monica, CA
    Former Employee - Medical Review Coordinator in Santa Monica, CA

    I worked at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    Getting paid is the only reason to work here. If you must take a job with AMR do so and keep looking. You will hate yourself otherwise.

    Cons

    Extremely hostile work environment with constant staff turnover
    Coworkers grading your work for quality
    Productivity and quality measured minute by minute and displayed to entire staff
    Open office with a lot of noise
    Editing medical reviews given by doctors that seemed gerbils wrote them
    Managers with no education medical field
    Owners that are sucking as much money as possible from the company while treating staff like slaves and paying slave wages
    Sometimes hard to want to go to work or make it through the day
    No opportunity for advancement

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop treating staff like slaves. Your productivity and quality measures are a joke. Your staff has found ways around your system and are taking advantage of your arrogance. If you paid more attention to your staff and less to your wallets you would have less staff turnover and a better product. As it is you are turning out reviews that if investigated would have you liable legally. Make your managers actually manage and not monitor a computer screen. Stop promoting a frat house mentality and stop the open office environment. When speaking with professionals on the phone background noise at AMR sounds like a kegger party.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
  10. My experience was discouraging and demoralizing.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Clinical Quality Nurse in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Clinical Quality Nurse in Los Angeles, CA

    I worked at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    In retrospect, I honestly can't think of a positive thing to say.

    Cons

    There was little or no training. What training there was that pertained to my job was provided by the medical director, whose time was extremely limited. An inordinate amount of time was spent with other people who described jobs other than my own, including a computer power point presentation by a person in another state that took forever and again, was not directly pertinent to my job. I shared an office with a person who did a different job, had little time to help me or answer questions, and spent a great deal of time talking about her personal life, past and present. This job was like riding a runaway train that I knew was going to crash, but I kept hoping things would get better. They didn't.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Have an actual written training program for new people with detailed, stated training objectives, including a time frame for achieving those objectives. Have an actual designated training whose full time job is to train the new employee for their actual job. Do not develop a total personality change during the second week, during which you snap at the new employee, saying repeatedly, "I already showed you this! Write it down!" This is why other employers have a training program that is entirely focused on the new employee's job for the first few weeks, with a designated trainer for that employee. My previous job offered me 1:1 training for a month with just one trainer.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11. 1 person found this helpful

    Its okay, if you prefer dead end.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Medical Review Coordinator in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Medical Review Coordinator in Los Angeles, CA

    I worked at Advanced Medical Reviews full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    -working remotely
    -great, fun , and young co-workers
    -nice locations
    -the work is easy

    Cons

    -poor management
    -almost impossible goals for promotion
    -low pay
    -employees are not respected by management
    -no monetary incentives
    -raises usually range from 30 to 60 cents per year
    -you are awarded mostly with breakfast
    -the work is easy, but not inspiring
    -no room for growth
    -management does not care about keeping you as an employee
    -very high turnover rate, management has said they are okay with this

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Management does not care about advice.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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