Argosy University Reviews

Updated July 15, 2015
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74 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (2)

    Not at all positive

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Admissions Representative in Arlington, VA
    Former Employee - Admissions Representative in Arlington, VA

    I worked at Argosy University part-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    Friendly staff and decent benefits. Hours were fairly predictable (i.e., no extra hours, or weekends) and therefore allowed for life outside of work.

    Cons

    High stress and burnout. Some days better than others.A times it appeared that there were conflicting directives to employees, which lead to a sense of fear and insecurity. We were expected to "sell" prospective students on the benefits of attending Argosy, DC (which is actually located in Arlington, VA) at "any cost". Thus, if our recruitment numbers did not meet our sales goals, we were lectured about potential consequences. The position very quickly became one of fear of reprisal, job insecurity, high stress, and burnout. To say that our recruitment tactics to prospective students was disingenuous is an understatement. I feel a tremendous amount of guilt about the students that I helped recruit.

    Advice to Management

    It is important to value your staff and students and treat all with the respect they deserve. It is also a good idea not to frequently change rules, procedures, etc, without advanced notification and proper training. Thus, this type of organizational management - inconsistent - leads to poor morale, loss of a sense of security, fear of reprisal, and burnout and a feeling that it is time to leave.


  2. Helpful (1)

    Admissions Representative

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Admissions Representative in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Admissions Representative in Chandler, AZ

    I worked at Argosy University full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Amazing Bennefits as well as amazing co-workers. Yep- that's pretty much it.

    Cons

    telemarketing job. Managers are always on a power trip. Everything but an admissions representative, sales job (selling school). Repeatedly calling individuals who told another AR to put them on the do not call list. Almost all of the people you talk to just want job so they can pay bills, NOT take out student loans they will never be able to pay back. The practicality of half of the students getting a degree is horrible. I'm not sure how this "institution" is accreted. Classes are so simple and such a joke.

    Advice to Management

    Assist AR's a lot more. Get off your power trips. Upper management should do an observation of lower management and see how unpraductive they are. Micromanagement at its finest.


  3. Helpful (1)

    ok place

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Argosy University full-time

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    solid people, fun place, free coffee

    Cons

    terrible leadership, live in fear on most days

    Advice to Management

    look what is going on in the industry


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  5. Tech Support

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Argosy University

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Great Company to Work for

    Cons

    not enough working hours. They cut the budget in the IT department forcing us to shorten our hours


  6. Helpful (1)

    Argosy

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Argosy University

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Good place to work but low pay

    Cons

    Not stable company but good place to work


  7. Helpful (3)

    Some ups but mostly downs

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Eagan, MN
    Current Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Eagan, MN

    I have been working at Argosy University full-time (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Benefits were good after the standard 90 days Decent job for the 20-something looking for a cheap education

    Cons

    No 401K match No flex-time Weak leads (admissions) "Free" education is taxed Too many reps calling from the same pool of candidates Company is financially unstable No advancement opportunities

    Advice to Management

    Job is ridiculously boring when you are calling the same 100 people 3 times/day. How many times can you hear the words "I'm not interested" or be hung-up on before you really start to look at your lead sources? Corporate or regional admissions management all come from a time when the education industry was growing either due to the recession or a strong economy. Now those people who were successful "picking the low hanging fruit" are trying to tell me that I am not doing my job correctly because I'm not hitting the numbers. How about all admissions personnel from the Sr. V.P. on down to the Sr. DOA get on the phone for one week per quarter and post their numbers for all to see? Let them experience the same challenges and explain how they overcome them. I'm willing to bet my two-week paycheck they won't even come close to hitting the goals they pressure us to achieve.


  8. Helpful (1)

    Expect the unexpected!@#$%^&*(

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Argosy University part-time (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    They pay competitive salaries. The employees are multi-cultural.

    Cons

    I come to work one day and my supervisor called me to his office and said that EDMC is doing a reorganization/downsizing of our department. EDMC is thus eliminating some postions. Unfortunately, my position is one of them. So, in short, I was out of a job!!!

    Advice to Management

    Value your most valuable assets - your people!!!


  9. Helpful (2)

    Adjunct Faculty - no benefits

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Argosy University

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Nice facility, good location. Great cafeteria.

    Cons

    The other adjuncts at EDMC were wonderful, professional, and passionate instructors who gave more than the max allowed hours on payroll. The director does not fight for the adjunct faculty and lets talent slip through the cracks. Most leave within a year or two. Full-time faculty very demeaning and unwilling to associate with adjuncts. Students aware of how things are run, but feel that they have already started and should just press on through to get the degree.

    Advice to Management

    Look for talent and do the best you can to keep it. Listen to adjunct faculty-they are in the real world, not holed-up in academia. How about an pay increase and/or a discount on classes? If you read your exit interviews, I know that the full-time faculty feel the same. Unless they have tenure-then they will not rock their high paying boat.


  10. Helpful (1)

    Coworkers are Great

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Argosy University full-time

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Location is beautiful and fellow employees are great

    Cons

    High stress level, pressued sales, Unrealistic goals.

    Advice to Management

    Give better service to students


  11. Helpful (3)

    Can't Summit a Mountain with Hands Tied (or: Hard to Soar with the Eagles Surrounded by Turkeys)

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Faculty
    Former Employee - Faculty

    I worked at Argosy University full-time (More than 10 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Passionate faculty; intelligent and teachable students; supportive of private practice; professional classrooms, excellent fringe benefits, dedicated chair-level and department-level leadership

    Cons

    inadequate (absent) administrative support; revolving door of campus-level leadership; inexperienced student services; inconsistent admissions support; double-messages from management concerning tensions between meeting anticipated expectations of accreditation bodies and expectations about enrollment and student performance; inability to align corporate (EDMC) goals, university (Argosy) goals, and local campus goals... always felt like the "folks at the top" either did not understand or did not care. The company frequently describes itself as "among the largest providers of private post-secondary education in North America ... with a total of 110 locations in 32 U.S. states and Canada." Moreover they add "Our educational institutions offer students the opportunity to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees and certain specialized non-degree diplomas in a broad range of disciplines, including design, media arts, health sciences, psychology and behavioral sciences, culinary, fashion, business, education, legal and information technology." My sense over my tenure at Argosy was that EDMC was too big.... as a jack of all trades, they are masters of none.

    Advice to Management

    1) Get out of the way... decision makers were isolated from the results of their decisions. Schools granting degrees leading to state-specific licensed-based career paths do not benefit from top-down "vision" and "mission" management... there are too many differences to have a "one size fits all" corporate culture. 2) Read Collins' "Good to Great" If not the whole book at least read chapter 5 and find the company "hedgehog." 3) Face the diseconomy of scale head on. While i am not an economist by any stretch, EDMC is facing a backlash on the back end of the benefits from an economy of scale gained as the company grew. As EDMC became larger it was more efficient and as long as students continued to enroll, it appeared poised to continue to grow. Nevertheless, as it grew it became increasingly costly to keep control of a its widespread corporate footprint and resulted in a bureaucracy as the top executives implemented more and more levels of management (administration). This required more students. As the executives introduced standards and controls in order to maintain enrollment this necessitated the hiring of more administrators to apply these standards and controls, and EDMC became too "top-heavy". Plummeting enrollment is not the cause of the current crisis. Students are a limited resource like trees are a limited resource. A lumber company can only harvest as many tress as regrowth makes sustainable. When EDMC had trouble finding more trees things became untenable. Typically, solutions to such top heavy companies is making it smaller. This can happen proactively, and involve breaking EDMC into one or more of its smaller educational units. if the management was willing, Argosy, South University, Brown Mackie, or the Art Institutes could be spun off as a separate entity. Another option could be for each local campus could be allowed to operate relatively autonomously from the company headquarters, with employee decisions (hiring, firing, promotions, wage scales, etc.) made by local administration, not dictated by EDMC. Facility, office space, design, and even purchasing decisions could also be made independently, with each location allowed to choose its own suppliers. Nevertheless, the desire for a unified market brand seemed to cloud this option. Moreover, even if they had made these difficult decisions, i doubt the changes would have resulted in a substantial reduction in EDMC leadership and headquarters staff. Unfortunately, with EDMC stock price plummeting to less than $1.00 today (it closed at $0.86), I think EDMC will downsize by default (pun intended) when a bankruptcy court will sell off the profitable components to pay creditors and shut down the rest.



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