Arthur Murray Dance Centers

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Arthur Murray Dance Centers Reviews

Updated February 12, 2015
Updated February 12, 2015
22 Reviews
4.6
22 Reviews
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John Kimmins
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Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Personable Sales

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hayward, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hayward, CA

    I have been working at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    Great work environment and personal development opportunities.

    Cons

    work-life balance, work demand, and sales driven.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    fun job, low pay, big time committment

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Instructor
    Former Employee - Instructor

    I worked at Arthur Murray Dance Centers

    Pros

    fun, free lessons. nice people, great exercise if you teach daily

    Cons

    low pay, training is much better from a competing dancer/couple than in studio. As an instructor you only think you are getting good. You are learning social not competitive dancing. focused on extreme psychological manipulation of students. they have no secrets not shared with whole staff daily.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    none. you won't change

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3.  

    Love & Hate. Two strong forces. Current employee.. 4 yrs.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Teacher
    Current Employee - Teacher

    I have been working at Arthur Murray Dance Centers

    Pros

    Dancing all day! Meeting exciting people. Sales training.

    Cons

    Crap pay but expected to be dressed in the nines everyday? U have a beard? Go shave? Management will tell you go put on more makeup. Working 45+ hours I've made roughly 34k this year. Once a month we have gala parties and a club night out. Where the students party with us until 12am. No extra pay. Its to "build bond with students". If u want a day off. Need a doctored note and they guilt you into coming in anyway, comparing u to other teachers. Raises are a joke here. U put in work, hire coaches to train you out of your own money (barely do the coaches work individually with teachers, when paid for by the franchisee.) Just to get a dollar raise. Hard work doesn't pay off in this job. Hard work shows u work hard so they give you more hard work without compensation. If you are a trained dancer? Expect little to no real training besides videos and handbooks. Coaches come in and MAYBE bless you with one new concept for you to obsess over. Its all money and sales and the franchisees will do whatever possible to become the best studio. Even at the cost of their employees. Work hours are 1-10pm. No option for part time. You MUST be fulltime. No room for part time. They want full devotion.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More pay.
    More recognition.
    More humility.
    1-10pm plus addition overtimes hours for events and weekends for events without additional pay. (If no students show up to the event to dance with u) u get like 50$ saying thank u for coming and working. No real incentive cause we barely see commission. I don't recommend this job.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5. 2 people found this helpful  

    Overworked & Underpaid

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor in Glastonbury, CT
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor in Glastonbury, CT

    I worked at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    1. Dance Training: Although quality is not always guaranteed, someone who has never danced before can get very valuable dance training in the basics using videos and a manual

    2. Team setting and close relationships with coworkers. This is a pro as long as you have a great team and manager, otherwise it is a con because no matter how much or little you like them, you have to be around them and work directly with them in close quarters.

    3. Exposure to training from professional coaches. The studio owners will pay for a dance coach to come and train staff in a group class setting anywhere from once a month to once every 6 months, depending on the Franchise.

    4. If you like glamour and glitz, you can submerge yourself in it in the dance community. (though most of it is pretense for the teachers as they live off of barely enough money to survive, let alone be pampered)

    Cons

    *I must preface by stating that this review may only apply to CT Franchises, other states may be better. Please investigate the studio if you are considering working from them or spending your money there.

    1. Pay. You might as well work as a fast food cashier at for the first two years because the average Instructor makes around the same amount of money.

    New instructors receive 9-10$ a lesson with a base salary that is typically 125-200$ a week ( it can vary by Franchise). It takes awhile to build clientèle, so you may be making less than minimum wage for several months until you build up.
    There are two options for a significant pay increase: convince your students to sign up for competitions which cost them thousands of dollars, or learn more and gain higher certifications which are given after passing a very long test and takes years to accomplish. There is also a ceiling, as you can only certify up to a certain level ( which would takes 10-20 years to accomplish) With each certification, your pay per lesson increases by 1$.
    The ideal is to teach 25 lessons a week, but this is very difficult and requires a good team setting or being a male instructor who has a lot of ladies that compete. It is possible for women but much harder as she would need to act as a man/lead.

    2. Opportunities for Growth. The promotions offered depend on the studios size, in a small franchise, your chances are slim.
    Generally there are three positions: Instructor (entry level), Director/Counselor (manager) or Franchisee (owner) that's it. (You can become a travelling consultant you need to spend lots of money on coachings and win competitions to then move on and coach others) .
    If your team is small with only one manager, you could potentially never receive a promotion, unless your manager left. The various "opportunities" that are then offered come with added responsibility but no added pay or benefits such as the dance trainer position where an employee is in charge of training the new dance instructors but does not get any extra compensation. This ends up resulting in very low motivation and low quality training sessions as it becomes a burden to the trainer.
    This varies dramatically by Franchise, the bigger the team, the more opportunities.

    3. Hours. Unavoidable 40+ work week with no paid overtime for your entire career unless you become a franchisee or a traveling consultant.
     The average studio hours are 1-10 pm Mon-Fri. You are typically permitted to begin part time to build your clientèle, but it is expected that you will become a full time worker and once you do, you can never go back to part time. This can be challenging if you have a family or need to work another job to gain a sustainable income. 10Pm is the end of the work day, but there is a mandatory meeting at the end of each day which can continue until 11pm or until management sees fit (one full hour past work time).
    There are also frequent competitions and student parties that occur outside of business hours, but all instructors are usually required to attend them.
    This pattern results in a typical 45 hour work week and there is no paid overtime as teachers are exempt.

    4. High Turn Over Rates and Poor Morale. Most Franchisees are very arrogant and show no respect for your time as an individual. They act as if they do not have to answer to anyone- not even the CT Labor Board, and treat you like a disposable body.
    There are frequently mandatory meetings that are held outside of work hours as well as unpaid training weekends and conferences which you are strongly expected to attend. If you do not attend, or question them, you may risk being shunned by the community and labeled as not being a committed worker.
    This can severely affect your work because most dancers are looking for dance partners and if the owners label you this way, it discourages other instructors from wanting to partner with you, thus hurting your dance experience and credibility with your clientele. Most employees are secretly very unhappy but no one will talk about it in fear or being labeled or shunned. They are frequently late themselves and will start meetings and functions hours late, but expect you to be early to everything.

    5. Quality of dance training. Arthur Murray is not well respected amongst the professionally trained as being good quality dancers. They are robotic and typically do not win in competitions outside of their own little pond. The best way to describe this is the blind leading the blind. As a new instructor or a student, you may be being trained by someone who came in off the street, read a dance book, and now is certified without looking very good or executing the moves well. Dance is obviously a very physical thing and to dance well, you need more than a manual with instructions on where to put your feet. However, this is how the majority of instructors are trained AND teach unless they pay for dance coachings from professionals on their own time and dime.
    Essentially, Arthur Murray is about teaching social dancing for fun and is sales oriented. If you want to become a serious dancer and expect high quality, you will be very frustrated and disappointed. Also, if you are a dancer with an extensive background, you will either be a valuable asset to the team and possibly the only member that knows anything about real dancing, or you might be viewed as a threat to the team and have to undergo "untraining" to get you to think like them ( I personally saw this happen to a very experienced dancer). You are trained on a need to know basis, the management makes sure you have just enough training to be able to teach but not an inch more.
    In the management training manuals it states clearly in bold letters that, "Arthur Murray is a business that runs a dance studio, and not a dance studio that runs a business".
    Sales is most important, dance quality comes second every time.

    6. One track mentality. At the end of the day, it doesn't matter if you're a terrible dancer, or have no clue what you're talking about, as long as you keep your numbers up. This is only a con if you were not expecting a sales driven position, which is not the guise under which most passionate young instructors sign up. What they might not tell you, is you are being hired as a lower level sales associate. Your job will be to sell dance programs and competition entries.
    The motto in Arthur Murray training meetings is that they need to " train the students in how to think" IE, the customer is not right. If the customer does not want to buy more or attend the competition, the instructor has not done a good enough job of training his/her student on how to think and behave in the studio. It is always the instructors fault if their student did not enter Arthur Murray to later become competitive dancers; they were not "trained" correctly.

    7. Arthur Murray is dangerously close to being a cult. Arthur Murray has an extreme and borderline paranoid focus on positive thinking and has held nationwide company training weekends on various theories in how to control your destiny and cure yourself of diseases via positive thinking. They want you to practice what they teach you as well as pass it on to your students. Some of this training seemed that it could be slightly offensive to religious groups that believe in a higher power as it was prescribing an entire way of life. Is it helpful information? Possibly. is it workplace appropriate? Certainly not.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop burying your heads in the sand when issues arise in the company, it does not make you a positive thinker, rather kills morale and de-motivates the staff. Start holding management personally accountable for the jobs that they do. Stop micromanaging employees and start hiring people that you actually trust to do their jobs correctly and then step back and let them work. If management fails to do their job time and time again, replace them.
    Start training your staff the way you train your students, with personal one on one instruction. If students can't learn solely in group settings why would you expect your staff to? Be more flexible with staff, it may be a shock, but they have actual lives outside of Arthur Murray World, like families and friends that want to see them. Maybe allowing some people to have part time hours or different shifts or schedules is a way to keep your staff from burnout and in the end decrease your turn over rates, which are disgustingly high. If you want happy students, keep a happy staff. This is a new world where the customer IS actually always right. Instead of trying to "train" and control how the staff and students think, it's time to start thinking about how you can better serve your clients needs and your staffs needs. Forcing people to think a certain way is disturbing and creates resistance and frustration.
    Start asking for feedback from staff and students - put up a box to get anonymous replies. If you cannot handle "negative" feedback and respond to the problems and concerns in the studio, than perhaps you shouldn't be a business in a real world with real problems.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
  6.  

    Incredible opportunities to advance rapidly, while building all types of skill sets, and working with wonderful people

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Supervisor in Ashburn, VA
    Current Employee - Supervisor in Ashburn, VA

    I have been working at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Arthur Murray provides every employee the training, encouragement, and opportunity they need to succeed. You get to work with wonderful people, both coworkers and clients, every day. You get to be active. You get free training. You even get opportunities for paid travel around the country (and even around the world!). Arthur Murray has been around for over a century, its way of teaching and doing business is time-tested as well as modernized, and the corporation stretches around the world. Yet each franchise is built on a local connection within their community. Teaching people to dance and putting smiles on their faces is one of the most rewarding things you can ever do-- and it's your JOB!

    Cons

    The hours are different than a typical 9-5 job, so that is something you will have to plan for.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7.  

    If you aren't dancing, expect no opportunities and a heavy work load..

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Administrative Assistant
    Current Employee - Administrative Assistant

    I have been working at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Some owners may allow you to take a few dance lesson a week as a perk, good job for a college student as studios are open afternoons to late evenings.

    Cons

    Teachers can be divas, no upwards mobility unless you want to take a paycut to be a teacher. If you become a teacher then you basically have to teach 35+ lessons a week to make a halfway decent living. A full certified teacher makes about 17% of the charged lesson cost.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Find a way to compensate both your teachers and administrators better. You expect people to not eat in order to afford travel, clothes, dance shoes, and a manicured look. Start compensating and your turnover will fall.

    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8.  

    Too many bosses, very little pay

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor/Specialist in Las Vegas, NV
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor/Specialist in Las Vegas, NV

    I worked at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Teaching amazing students. gaining great teacher to student relationships and seeing them be proud of themselves.

    Cons

    Crumbs for pay. Very expensive lessons, limit students intentionally. Sales based, hard to make good money if you are not in management. My franchise had 3 owners , 2 were passive and one was just mean.
    Training is from outdated videos and poorly printed books. It was literally smoke and mirrors. Not worth it if you want a real career as a respected dance teacher . Plus you are only licensed through them if you leave you have to get re-licensed. Horrible. I left with a smile.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Update training.
    Up the pay.
    Truly get to know your teachers.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9.  

    Know What You Want Out of Life..

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor in Ledgewood, NJ
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor in Ledgewood, NJ

    I worked at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Great community of dancers, I lucked out and had a really great boss that cared about improving our team since not all studios do. They really want you to move up and own your own studio one day. Which, if that's your dream- great!

    Cons

    Since they do all the training, you don't make much. Very commission/sales based and you must cater to students whims. Some students are great some are divas. You are on your feet and learning constantly, it was very stimulating and rewarding but when I have kids I want to be home by 6pm, not just starting to work. I was full time and worked 6 days a week, sometimes 7. Which meant working 13 days in a row sometimes!

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep up Weekly/Daily meetings to keep the teachers focused.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10.  

    Easily Misleading

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor
    Former Employee - Dance Instructor

    I worked at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    This is an active and creative job.

    Cons

    The hours are long and very involved, you will joke about the 'outside world' and then one day realize it is not so funny. There are exceptions to the rule, but generally speaking, family life, or general social life is very difficult with this job. You can learn many great things, and get wonderful experiences, but this is not a long term career for most people.
    Many other pros and cons extremely varied, as this is a studio franchise, and all are different. Generally speaking, the pay is very low, particularly once you really look at how many hours you are putting in.

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  11.  

    Interesting idea, terrible management and pay

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Arthur Murray Dance Centers full-time

    Pros

    Teaching great students, or challenging ones, dance is always fun
    Have a few opportunities to learn from professionals

    Cons

    Get paid peanuts when expected to dress to the nines for work
    Belittled and given videos and outdated books as 'holy teaching guides' rather than human mentoring beyond the first month
    Shady business scheme, students pay top dollar but teachers don't see it, and the studios are often run down as well
    If this is your career, be ready to live in poverty and be pushed down until you gain years of tenure which MAY make you eligible to go up in the franchise
    Management encourages drone work, nothing above or beyond to help the studio as a instructor
    Despite the love for dance and teaching, finances and management had made me hate something I loved. Art became a business scam.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    If you want top teachers, have more opportunities for training rather than solely pushing competition between studios. I would have rather paid for good training than spent hours learning from 1980/1990 videos.

    A happy teacher make for happy students. Looking outside of a studio and seeing 99% of teachers smoking can't suggest that these teachers are happy, looking for a healthy life style, or are under controllable stress.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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