CNBC Reviews

Updated August 4, 2014
Updated August 4, 2014
28 Reviews
3.2
28 Reviews
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Approve of CEO
CNBC President Mark Hoffman
Mark Hoffman
9 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Overall a good place to work for in news

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Segment Producer  in  Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Segment Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Schedule (no weekends or late nights), Comcast benefits.

    Cons

    Politics and HR. HR is supposed to retain talent, but instead, they try to keep you for the lowest salary possible.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    recognize talent behind camera and reward them with promotions and the right salary, when deserved . I've seen good employees stay in the same position for four years and often talk about their desire to leave.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Only Good For Air Talent

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Undisclosed  in  Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Former Employee - Undisclosed in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I worked at CNBC as a contractor for less than a year

    Pros

    They paid me a lot of money. The workers are generally good, competent people working there, but it's run by clowns. Since my manager was off her meds, nobody paid attention to what I was doing, so once I realized the place was a hell hole, I started a company from my desk that grossed $1.2 million over the next couple of years.

    Note: Don't take the Yoh hiring route. Get a talent contract.

    Cons

    Bad leadership. Bad culture. Most of the executives are laughably stupid, or just lazy nabobs, and my boss was literally insane. She was right out of United States of Tara.

    The first warning sign was after I had very cordial interviews with most of the leaders in my department, and likewise with my soon-to-be-boss, right up until the very end when her face went into I'm-a-crazy-person mode and she said "I want you to know -- it's crazy here!! Can you handle that??!!" and I knew she was the crazy one making it miserable.

    I was then hired in through Yoh, which is their temp service and a means of screwing all non-talent-contract employees. I was never told how much money I would be paid when I was hired, but it came out to $115k with no PTO or benefits for a year. Well, hey, $115k is good, so whatever. Had I been there until they hired me, CNBC, as per NBC's policy, would've then waited a year to get me to full benefits. So their commitment to people is zero.

    They hired a new exec who started sacking a lot of Yoh employees in a department that I worked with a lot. My boss explained that they were replacing them with good employees... even though I was a Yoh hire.

    My boss told me not to show up on my first day, because she'd be too busy, but she never told me when my revised start date would be. So I showed up on my original start date. They paged her. I sat in the lobby for two hours before she came and got me.

    My job was to put together a Power Point describing the things that I'd been hired to do, and then walk through the building with it, telling people that we really, really should do it. This was, of course, ignored -- largely due to egomania and politics. But there are worse things than being hired to build one deck and repeat yourself for $115k per year, so I went along with it.

    One time the CEO called a meeting with my department to inform us that we'd "lost our swagger." Mind you, this guy is a hunchback who is constantly sullen and sort of shuffles around the place. I'm not sure how long it had been since Mark Hoffman swaggered, but it might have exceeded my age by a few years.

    We had the same department meeting every month, like something out of Office Space. If the numbers were up, the VP went on in a monotone explaining that numbers were up. If the numbers were down, the VP went on in a monotone explaining that numbers were down. Once, he explained that, if we didn't have any write-ups, we'd all be getting the same 3% cost of living adjustment that year (even though Comcast had just bought us).

    I then realized that, if I spent the next 10 years on this very slow-moving hamster wheel, I'd be making about 50% more money. Pretty boring, in all. This was the point at which I realized that I really, really wanted out of there.

    I got aggressive with my own business, and largely ignored CNBC.

    Because everything there is based on politics (rather than, say, merit, or the strength of your ideas, or decent people wanting to work together...) my boss made sure to have a pretext for firing me, even though I was a temp. She scheduled a meeting, stood me up for the meeting, and then fired me for missing the meeting. I was literally watching her chat in the cafeteria while standing me up for our meeting.

    She did give me two weeks pay, and they implied that they wouldn't contest my unemployment. I was probably the happiest firing candidate they'd ever debriefed. A driver in a company car run me back to Brooklyn, where I proceeded to make a lot more money from my couch.

    I never applied for the unemployment.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    What can you say to people in a place like this? Get out while you can if you're a decent manager. Otherwise, you deserve what you've got.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3.  

    Great Company!

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at CNBC

    Pros

    Great working environment, everyone is friendly and willing to help. As an intern, my bosses genuinely cared about my development and challenged me. Also great company with great benefits for employees

    Cons

    Unpaid for interns. I also had to come in early to go to New York some days, and my only reimbursement was a $300 travel stipend for the 11 weeks I was there. I also drove 1 hour each way to work everyday.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    keep doing a great job!

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  5.  

    If you on-air talent you're royally treated, otherwise they can care less about you

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Producer  in  Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Dynamic atmosphere, surrounded by brainiacs, and meet interesting people

    Cons

    Work long hours, nobody cares about you as a person, bosses encourage people to work sick (and get others sick)

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Learn to care about people you work with and hire supervisors with training.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6.  

    Good internship experience if you have the right advisor

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Digital Intern
    Former Employee - Digital Intern

    I worked at CNBC as an intern for less than a year

    Pros

    When I asked for more work and exposure to different parts of the business, my advisor let me see everything including going over to 30 Rock. The food court is delicious and not expensive.

    Cons

    It is very big and very busy. There was not a social culture at least in my department. People liked each other but at the end of the day everyone commuted their separate ways (full time staff I mean.) Everyone ate lunch at their desks.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Consider hiring out of internships to make it worthwhile for us. We do real work.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7.  

    A very enjoyable and challenging place to work.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - User Interface Developer  in  Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Former Employee - User Interface Developer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I worked at CNBC as a contractor for more than a year

    Pros

    There is a shared sense ownership with all the work being done, the co-workers are fun, the in building cafeteria and gym was definitely a plus. I also like the location as it's right near the city yet easy to get to and rarely any traffic.

    Cons

    Sometimes I was required to stay late without extra pay and there's a lot of upper management drama that can sometime affect us developers.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  8.  

    Could have been a good place to work, but...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Producer  in  Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Former Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I worked at CNBC full-time

    Pros

    News an exciting space, cable TV good business.

    Cons

    Tension in all ranks of the organization

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9.  

    Good variety of experiences

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Intern  in  Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Intern in Washington, DC

    I have been working at CNBC as an intern for less than a year

    Pros

    I worked there as a college intern. Generally nice people, with some exceptions, as it will be at any workplace. Cool exposure to different personalities, and I felt like I was a contributing member of our show's team. I did a lot of menial work, but my research was also used by producers.

    Cons

    Very unstructured internship and not great for networking outside of my department. I wasn't too exposed to senior leadership, but some colleagues expressed frustration with the politics and management practices.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10.  

    Most producers are very young and willing to work very long hours

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Producer  in  Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC as a contractor for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Work at the #1 business news network, learn from the best in the business

    Cons

    Work 12 hour days or else, and some bosses can be abusive. Everyone pretty much accepts that's the way it is. If you don't like it, go work for number 2, 3 or 4. No work-life balance.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Recent college grads will work long hours for you, but they don't add much value to the programming content.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  11.  

    Too much internal politics

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at CNBC full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    good camaradeire, biggest name in biz news

    Cons

    terrible management, very difficult to get ahead without internal politics, lack of qualified managers at higher level

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    get rid of existing management

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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