CNBC Reviews

Updated April 6, 2015
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3.3
37 Reviews
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CNBC President Mark Hoffman
Mark Hoffman
11 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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  1. Great

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Former Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I worked at CNBC full-time (Less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Perfect. Lots of great people, great food, great opoortunities, nothing not to like about working there. It was an incredible place. Would highly recommend to anyone.

    Cons

    I couldn't really say anything bad about it if I tried. I guess you could say the food was a little overpriced. . . maybe. But even that is a stretch.

    Advice to Management

    None

  2. Great company!

    Current Intern - Intern in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Intern - Intern in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC as an intern (Less than a year)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Wonderful place to intern! A lot of opportunity to check out other departments and units, great office atmosphere, very nice people overall!

    Cons

    As an intern, I couldn't find any cons to working here! It is a little trip from the city but they provide a lot of shuttles for employees and interns.

  3. A great place but limited advancement.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Senior Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC full-time (More than 8 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Great benefits. First in business.

    Cons

    Limited diversification of subject. They love to compliment themselves. they do hire from within but are not open to outside talent. If you are in one segment of the company, it's difficult to transfer elsewhere. HR Managers don't recognize talent. It's a network with no personality.

    Advice to Management

    Get to know who actually works here. Everyone is a number.

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  5. Ok...bit of a boys club

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at CNBC

    Pros

    Fast paced, interesting subject matter...

    Cons

    Long commute (but the have shuttles from NYC). Once you're out there, that's pretty much it. Off putting hiring policies. they let a lot of good people go because....?

  6. Great people, lousy policies

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Writer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Writer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC full-time (More than 5 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Great people to work with, most of them are committed to quality work and generating a product they can be proud of.

    Cons

    The layers of corporate bureaucracy are staggering, and it negatively effects the workplace.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your people better.

  7. cnbc

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at CNBC

    Pros

    not 24 hour network so less intense than others

    Cons

    workplace is very cliquey and that can be annoying

  8. Overall a good place to work for in news

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Segment Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Segment Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC full-time (More than 3 years)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Schedule (no weekends or late nights), Comcast benefits.

    Cons

    Politics and HR. HR is supposed to retain talent, but instead, they try to keep you for the lowest salary possible.

    Advice to Management

    recognize talent behind camera and reward them with promotions and the right salary, when deserved . I've seen good employees stay in the same position for four years and often talk about their desire to leave.

  9. Helpful (2)

    Only Good For Air Talent

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Contractor - Undisclosed in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Former Contractor - Undisclosed in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I worked at CNBC as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    They paid me a lot of money. The workers are generally good, competent people working there, but it's run by clowns. Since my manager was off her meds, nobody paid attention to what I was doing, so once I realized the place was a hell hole, I started a company from my desk that grossed $1.2 million over the next couple of years.

    Note: Don't take the Yoh hiring route. Get a talent contract.

    Cons

    Bad leadership. Bad culture. Most of the executives are laughably stupid, or just lazy nabobs, and my boss was literally insane. She was right out of United States of Tara.

    The first warning sign was after I had very cordial interviews with most of the leaders in my department, and likewise with my soon-to-be-boss, right up until the very end when her face went into I'm-a-crazy-person mode and she said "I want you to know -- it's crazy here!! Can you handle that??!!" and I knew she was the crazy one making it miserable.

    I was then hired in through Yoh, which is their temp service and a means of screwing all non-talent-contract employees. I was never told how much money I would be paid when I was hired, but it came out to $115k with no PTO or benefits for a year. Well, hey, $115k is good, so whatever. Had I been there until they hired me, CNBC, as per NBC's policy, would've then waited a year to get me to full benefits. So their commitment to people is zero.

    They hired a new exec who started sacking a lot of Yoh employees in a department that I worked with a lot. My boss explained that they were replacing them with good employees... even though I was a Yoh hire.

    My boss told me not to show up on my first day, because she'd be too busy, but she never told me when my revised start date would be. So I showed up on my original start date. They paged her. I sat in the lobby for two hours before she came and got me.

    My job was to put together a Power Point describing the things that I'd been hired to do, and then walk through the building with it, telling people that we really, really should do it. This was, of course, ignored -- largely due to egomania and politics. But there are worse things than being hired to build one deck and repeat yourself for $115k per year, so I went along with it.

    One time the CEO called a meeting with my department to inform us that we'd "lost our swagger." Mind you, this guy is a hunchback who is constantly sullen and sort of shuffles around the place. I'm not sure how long it had been since Mark Hoffman swaggered, but it might have exceeded my age by a few years.

    We had the same department meeting every month, like something out of Office Space. If the numbers were up, the VP went on in a monotone explaining that numbers were up. If the numbers were down, the VP went on in a monotone explaining that numbers were down. Once, he explained that, if we didn't have any write-ups, we'd all be getting the same 3% cost of living adjustment that year (even though Comcast had just bought us).

    I then realized that, if I spent the next 10 years on this very slow-moving hamster wheel, I'd be making about 50% more money. Pretty boring, in all. This was the point at which I realized that I really, really wanted out of there.

    I got aggressive with my own business, and largely ignored CNBC.

    Because everything there is based on politics (rather than, say, merit, or the strength of your ideas, or decent people wanting to work together...) my boss made sure to have a pretext for firing me, even though I was a temp. She scheduled a meeting, stood me up for the meeting, and then fired me for missing the meeting. I was literally watching her chat in the cafeteria while standing me up for our meeting.

    She did give me two weeks pay, and they implied that they wouldn't contest my unemployment. I was probably the happiest firing candidate they'd ever debriefed. A driver in a company car run me back to Brooklyn, where I proceeded to make a lot more money from my couch.

    I never applied for the unemployment.

    Advice to Management

    What can you say to people in a place like this? Get out while you can if you're a decent manager. Otherwise, you deserve what you've got.

  10. Great Company!

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at CNBC

    Pros

    Great working environment, everyone is friendly and willing to help. As an intern, my bosses genuinely cared about my development and challenged me. Also great company with great benefits for employees

    Cons

    Unpaid for interns. I also had to come in early to go to New York some days, and my only reimbursement was a $300 travel stipend for the 11 weeks I was there. I also drove 1 hour each way to work everyday.

    Advice to Management

    keep doing a great job!

  11. If you on-air talent you're royally treated, otherwise they can care less about you

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ
    Current Employee - Producer in Englewood Cliffs, NJ

    I have been working at CNBC full-time (More than 10 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Dynamic atmosphere, surrounded by brainiacs, and meet interesting people

    Cons

    Work long hours, nobody cares about you as a person, bosses encourage people to work sick (and get others sick)

    Advice to Management

    Learn to care about people you work with and hire supervisors with training.

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