California Department of Finance

  www.dof.ca.gov
  www.dof.ca.gov

California Department of Finance Reviews

Updated August 15, 2014
Updated August 15, 2014
5 Reviews
3.3
5 Reviews
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Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Amazing internship program

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at California Department of Finance

    Pros

    DoF staff are passionate about making the internship a learning experience. They are all extremely knowledgeable. My cubicle was next to a woman who had almost 30 years of experience. Projects were self-paced and challenging. This was such a great opportunity.

    Cons

    Sacramento isn't the nicest place to live or work. I recommend living in nearby Davis.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Irena, thank you for being so passionate and committed. You have given me some phenomenal insights into my life.

  2.  

    Not what it sounds like

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Sacramento, CA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Sacramento, CA

    I worked at California Department of Finance full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    This department offers respectable pay and a good slate of benefits. In fact, this particular department is one of the higher paying points of entry to employment with the State of California, irrespective of a specific experiential or academic background. With few exceptions, the prevailing atmosphere is one of respect and civility. If involved in the budget, it also provides the opportunity to learn how state departments and programs operate, together with the cogs, wheels, and levers that keep these machines in motion.

    Cons

    The work for many who are actively involved in the budget and related functions such as audits is quite different from what one would expect as a budget analyst or auditor in a typical finance environment. This is a training ground for high-level bureaucrats and the learning style, from the very beginning, is top-down. Because of this, there are a lot of meetings to discuss the meetings, and this can be frustrating and, at times, even really boring. For the amount of time spent, the amount of usable work product is low. A lot of employees appear to feign a sincere interest in the issues they are dealing with, yet it's rarely convincing. What is convincing is the apathy, low morale, and lack of knowledge (which is why everyone has to get back to you). With employees coming from different backgrounds, one occasionally sees that those with impressive credentials and extensive knowledge are more understated while those with lesser credentials, relatively speaking, might be more vocal and try harder to be noticed, meaning that one might think they have MBAs from Wharton, but that is far from the case. The few "lifers" who have scaled the ranks without a degree, or a really odd one for that job, can be defensive or overzealous in trying to demonstrate knowledge and authority. Additionally, this department has its own position and salary series which doesn't make for an easy transfer to equivalent work or pay in a state department which may interest an employee. Transfers are geared to those who have been there for a good while and are seasoned bureaucrats. For many, it is probably better to enter state service through the more generic position titles and work toward advancement in an area of state government that really interests them, though that's a longer route to reaching higher earnings. There, it is more likely the learning will be of the bottom-up variety, and thus impart the feeling of being more productive and satisfied. If one is not that interested in politics, politicians, and the amorphous and nuanced analysis of policy issues, yet still intelligent and analytical, this, and a few other similar state departments, are NOT recommended places to seek employment. It's often very boring, the back-to-back meetings begin to run together and those who like to hear themselves talk begin to sound like the noise uttered by the teacher on the "Charlie Brown" series, and it's too bureaucratically redundant and inefficient.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Do not obfuscate what the job entails, particularly to new entrants. Be direct about what the job involves, other than the fact that the hours can be long and irregular. One would expect that this is because a high level of production or output is required, but it is actually caused by how clumsily information moves through the ranks and is disseminated. Oftentimes, the tier of management on the Blackberry circuit, together with their peer group, does not share that information so that people beneath them can carry out their assignments. Change the job titles and clarify the job descriptions, as necessary, to better reflect the positions and the related job content. Sometimes, there is mention made of DOF's "culture." Every department in the State, and every business, has a "culture." The issue is that DOF's "culture" is "cultish." Dial it back a notch, to simply being a "culture," which might help reduce the prevalence of long faces seen when one looks into successive cubicles.

    Doesn't Recommend
  3.  

    It's not as bad as most state jobs....

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Auditor in Sacramento, CA
    Current Employee - Auditor in Sacramento, CA

    I have been working at California Department of Finance

    Pros

    This isn't your "typical" sterotypical state job. Overtime and travel is a part of the job and is required often, but overall I would say that the quality of life you will enjoy is still acceptable. The management is always flexible with personal issues (e.g sick spouse or kid's field trip), and they do a good job of conveying to you that they think of you as a person with a life outside of work, and not just a machine to turn over product for them. Compensation is far too low but the pension program is meant to make up for it. At the department of Finance, there is definitely not the level of stress as in private industry, but also not the same level of rewards.

    Cons

    The level of compensation is far too low.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Select good middle managers and listen to their opinions

    No opinion of CEO
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  5.  

    Easy job that allows you to gain experience as a state employee.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at California Department of Finance

    Pros

    Allows you to experience what its like to work a full day as a state employee.

    Cons

    Responsibilities were very random and sometimes you didn't know what you were going to do for the day.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Create a more concrete structure and have formal training for students to learn and gain experience.

  6.  

    Great place to work for if you want to work for the State of California

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at California Department of Finance

    Pros

    Things are different pretty much every day. Although the budget cycle is supposed to remain the same, legislators can move dates left and right on a whim. Since the Department is a support group for the Governor's office, all work flow is pretty much dictated by the budget. Also, most people get promoted if they show promise--this hardly ever happens in state agencies.

    Cons

    Budget analysts can work a lot of overtime, and won't know until the last minute sometimes. Managers/supervisors can sometimes put in more work than they are paid. Doesn't pay as much as similar jobs in the private sector. Health and retirement benefits are going down.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Management needs to be able to provide more communication to its staff, especially when there are issues that will affect lower-level employees. Requests to fill vacant positions should also be more seriously considered.

    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO

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