Edward Jones Reviews

Updated March 26, 2015
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  1. 1 person found this helpful

    First and only career

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor

    I have been working at Edward Jones (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Work more, make more
    Someone is always willing to help
    Decent training program

    Cons

    Door knocking
    Some things aren't explained to you until the last minute

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Trim some of the fat at home office

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
  2. Not a work life balance

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Edward Jones

    Pros

    Learned a lot and was held accountable for my results and performance

    Cons

    Leadership did not care about their people and it was a very dysfunctional team atmosphere. Compensation was below industry standards and their benefits were not all that they were cracked up to be. There was little opportunity for growth and was promised things were change and opportunities would arise but I just kept giving more and nothing in return.

    Doesn't Recommend
  3. 4 people found this helpful

    FA Training-Do yourself a favor and run, run far away!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor Trainee
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor Trainee

    I have been working at Edward Jones full-time

    Pros

    Edward Jones is willing to throw some money at you to study for your licenses and pass out their advertising brochures door to door.

    Cons

    If you are lucky enough to get a good knight or takeover an office where someone is retiring, you'll be fine. Unfortunately, these opportunities are usually given to relatives of the retiring FA, or those in corporate who know where to move. Don't believe you can make it from scratch. You can't. Those days are over and the nation is infiltrated with established Edward Jones offices, who are your competition.

    This is a dangerous job, especially for women, who are sent out to knock on stranger's doors for up to 3 years, unarmed and unprotected (It's against company policy to carry a weapon). In the first few weeks of door knocking, you will be passing out your cellphone number (handwritten on the back of their advertising brochure) to these strangers until Edward Jones gets you a business line. You are expected to get 25 phone numbers per day for 7 weeks from these strangers, and attend meetings with your foundation trainer-That is, if they have time to see you. Don't expect to learn about investments. Expect to spend 12 hours per day knocking to get your numbers. You will not have a business card or anything of value to offer anyone, not even an office...Just get the phone number and tell them you're opening "a practice". You will not get a real office for over a year... Could be 3 years.

    After 7 weeks, if you have 350+ phone numbers, you will be sent back to St Louis to call these strangers you know very little about to sell them something they don't need or want while someone from corporate listens in on your calls. At this "Eval/Grad", Jones will tell you that "you can't hurt them by selling them J&J, for example.

    When you return from Eval/Grad, expect to door knock for a few more years, rain or shine, sub zero temperature or heat. It doesn't matter. Just do it...and get those phone numbers!

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Get rid of the door knocking. It's dangerous, degrading, humiliating & so unprofessional for an investment firm. Match trainees to Good Knight offices or retirement offices only...You know this is the only way they can make it in today's world.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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  5. Subpar for newer Financial Advisors.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Financial Advisor in Dallas, TX
    Former Employee - Financial Advisor in Dallas, TX

    I worked at Edward Jones

    Pros

    Excellent benefits and lots of hometown support.

    Cons

    Too many newer financial advisors and incompetent home office support.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop with the 20/20 vision mission statement and work on increasing assets under management. You can't follow a rubic for everyone to succeed the same way.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  6. 7 people found this helpful

    What Edward Jones May Not Be Telling You

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Financial Advisor in Harrisburg, PA
    Former Employee - Financial Advisor in Harrisburg, PA

    I worked at Edward Jones full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    Great training and a lot of nice financial advisors (FAs) who are interested in your success.

    Cons

    Unfortunately, I was never told that when I completed the "door-knocking" period and the initial training that I would not have an office to go to. There were no area Edward Jones offices that had sufficient AUM (assets under management) to bring on board a new FA under an asset-sharing arrangement . . . so after three months I received a surprise telephone call from someone in Saint Louis who I had never met telling me that my employment had been terminated.

    Look, this is a good company. They just have an unique business model that seems to work well for them--but sometimes not too well for new FAs. However, my advice is that one should not accept an FA position with Edward Jones unless that person is made to understand from the start that he/she will be paired with a named and established EJ financial advisor under an asset-sharing arrangement once the initial training has been completed. If you are not so paired when initially hired, then after the initial training period you will risk having no office from which to conduct business with clients, no assets to share (and therefore very little prospect of earning a post-training-period subsistence income while building a practice), or perhaps you will just get a phone call out of the blue from someone in HR telling you that your employment has been terminated.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    My advice to EJ management is just to not hire prospective new FAs unless you bring them in under an office- and asset-sharing arrangement. Management should also have the guts to do in-person terminations. Some of your new-hires have quit good jobs to join EJ, only to receive a gutless termination call from a stranger. A quality company should "man-up" to unpleasant tasks--if anything, as an acknowledgment of respect for the person they hired.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  7. 2 people found this helpful

    The culture of the firm that is portrayed in Fortune and in all the recruiting marketing is not a fair representation.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Saint Louis, MO
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Saint Louis, MO

    I worked at Edward Jones full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    EDJ has a very tight leash on anyone or anybody that is out in the public representing the firm. Not just advisors mind you - I am speaking mainly about the local regional leadership, the home office leaders and the recruiters and managers in the field. As such their training on company message is great - if you are interested in being very well trained in exactly what to say about the firm in exactly the way they want you to say it there is no better place to be. You will be taught the history of the firm, the history of growth and how the firm became employee owned.

    You will learn exactly what your responses should be when questioned about (1) the investment selling methodologies, (2) the seemingly inappropriate relationships in place with preferred product partners, (3) the employee morale issues that are hidden to continue being ranked as the best place to work, (4) the pressure applied to non-Christians or non-white's.

    In fact the training received in how to ignore or explain & rationalize is best in class.

    If you are considering working for Edward Jones as a financial advisor beware. I have seen situations where intelligent hard working people have been pushed to failure indirectly by other financial advisors in the region, by the leaders in the region and by support people in the home office.

    If you are considering going to work in the offices in St. Louis or Tempe - or in Toronto understand that depending upon your leader - how close or how far they are from getting partnership or how close or how far their boss is from getting partnership (general, not limited) you may have the greatest culture or nothing short of all out political Armageddon. For the most part don't worry about the people who have been at Jones for more than seven years...but the ones hired in from Merrill Lynch, UBS and other places to teach Edward Jones the firm what is needed are horrible to work with.

    With that said I have met the Managing Partner and all the leaders in the firm - great people. If the title has "director" in it be careful.

    Cons

    Never say a word publicly about anything or anyone that can come off as a criticism. You will be marked for removal. Do not outshine the master (your boss) or the person that your boss is grooming. Don't use math or statistics to disprove a broad or incorrect statement (especially in recruiting). Meetings started with Christian prayers, multiple and often references to Jesus in general meetings and assembly will make for an uncomfortable time.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Honestly - trust but verify. Ask people questions about what is really happening and then don't punish or penalize them when they talk. Better yet don't let the scared department lead punish or penalize them after you leave.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  8. financial advisor trainee

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor Trainee in Tempe, AZ
    Current Employee - Financial Advisor Trainee in Tempe, AZ

    I have been working at Edward Jones

    Pros

    Great Company with great values. But training program is not that structured once you are in the field. Overall great company.

    Cons

    low pay and door knocking will test your psychological stability. once in the field training and support can drop off.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    provide more structured training.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9. BOA

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - BOA Branch Office Administrator
    Current Employee - BOA Branch Office Administrator

    I have been working at Edward Jones

    Pros

    Great HQ support and mentoring

    Cons

    FA's need a lot of hand holding

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Train FA's on systems

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
  10. This is a great company that takes great care of all of their employees. Very happy to work here.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Edward Jones

    Pros

    At Edward Jones, you get to be what you want to be. You are the boss. The work is challenging, but is very rewarding. I enjoy going to the office every day.

    Cons

    Getting started is challenging. It is a lot of long hours for not a lot of pay. It pays off in the end if you stick with it.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  11. 2 people found this helpful

    Salary is abysmal

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Tech Specialist
    Former Employee - Tech Specialist

    I worked at Edward Jones

    Pros

    Good work life balance is good.

    Cons

    Pathetic salary and bad work environment

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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