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3M is generally speaking a great company, and I enjoyed my time there, I learned a lot from a lot of people.

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Engineer in Austin, TX
Former Employee - Engineer in Austin, TX

I worked at 3M

Recommends
Approves of CEO
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

Good pay
Great benefits
Still had a pension plan, but not for new employees now
Reasonable flexibility in working from home when needed, etc

Cons

Long hours, depending on the job, 60 hour workweeks were not uncommon
Travel, again depending on the type of job
Little accountability for management
Slow but steady downward trend in how people are treated

Advice to Management

Listen to your technical employees, they make the company work. Don't be too quick to mock traditional 3M values, and embrace the cultures of other companies, remember that 3M has been around for 100+ years and is currently thriving- this means that the 3M way can't be all that bad.

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  1. Helpful (4)

    Strange company, level of internal politics and negativity stifling.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Interactive Marketing in Maplewood, MN
    Former Employee - Interactive Marketing in Maplewood, MN

    I worked at 3M

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    If you are coming in to 3M with previous digital expertise, you will notice immediately the need to educate your peers, which can be a good thing, and can become taxing. My particular manager seemed to never be there, so working flex hours was not an issue, but can't speak to other teams. The work load was not too extensive for me, but that may have been due to the in-fighting across teams that allowed very little to get assigned and done. They had a decent web mail client, which, given managers' propensity to answer and send all emails after 8pm was a life saver.

    Cons

    I would not know where to start here. Most employees have been there for 10-20+ years, so this particular division did not take kindly to outsiders. The in-fighting between teams was so extensive that I was given a list of people to "not respond to via email or phone." I was also told not to attend meetings without approval from my manager to ensure my expertise was not "stolen" by "the enemy." Yuck. I was closed off from projects I offered the most seasoned expertise in, due to senior leadership very much disliking each other. It was disappointing to not get to leverage my expertise in an arena that so badly needed it, and the constant back-stabbing and bad-mouthing of co-workers that started on day one and never stopped made me very uncomfortable. Also, I was constantly asked to tap my network of digital vendors, agencies and resources to produce RFPs or work for 3M at the 11th hour that never went anywhere. Great way to ruin long-standing working relationships outside of the company. I was not aware of anyone who seemed "happy" working there compared to other companies I have worked for. No one smiled, ever.

    I finally had to start working on projects without telling my manager just to ensure I was doing anything at all and that I was helping them from spending way too much for way too little or just simply doing something not aligned with their audience/customer needs.

    From a sheer "company" perspective, the oddities at 3M Healthcare were endless. There were no refrigerators for employees to store lunch, beverages, etc. It may not sound like a big deal - try it sometime. The lunchroom was open very briefly every day, and offered the worst, most unhealthy and expensive selection of food (if you got there in time to get any) I have ever seen, anywhere. To avoid waste, they provided less food than needed, and anything edible was gone immediately. There's nothing but fast food around there, so going off-site was not a better option. I spent my first three days literally sitting in an empty cube with no computer (which can be typical) but also with nothing to read, ramp-up on, or anyone coming by to say hello or get me situated, manager included. I had to train myself on all systems and getting logins to do so was far more frustrating and time-consuming than usual. The commute is horrid, too, unless you live out that way.

    There was no discernible process to anything, and trying to instill any was futile. I had to ask folks many times for things they'd promised to deliver, to little avail. I never really knew what I was supposed to be working on, what would come up as "due" at any time, or what would be summarily cancelled or taken off my plate - all of this was due to politics. I spent more time in meetings about projects that never moved forward (or that at least our team was "kicked off of") than in meetings about viable projects.

    I attempted to address all of these issues over and over, to no result, and ended up having to print and save the nasty emails between teams their managers to ensure I was never "blamed" for something I was not involved in. Not fun.

    It might be fine for folks that have been there forever, and other divisions may be more advanced in their collaboration and politicking skills not to mention digital savvy. I didn't stay long enough to find out. I actually saw one person start and quit within a week while I was there. If you offer valuable expertise and have worked for other companies be ready for a massive culture shock.

    Advice to Management

    Play nicely, and serve the customer, not your egos, infighting or chest-beating. Leverage expertise that you did not previously have internally when it is offered to you. Stop talking badly about other managers to their team members, and do not slight their team members or discount their expertise due to your own upper-level politics. Plan, and then follow through. Work smart, not hard, and use the proper vendors/agencies for what you are trying to accomplish, rather than agencies you are "friends with" who may not have the skills needed to do the job. If you are going to swear and talk badly of others, close your office door. Sitting outside your office and hearing it all day is not fun and quickly lowers morale. DOn't spend a team status meeting taklking badly of other teams/managers. Realize that a nice mix of 3M-seasoned managers, and managers from other companies is a GOOD thing, not a competition.


  2. Positive experience with limited ability for career advancement with appropriate compensation.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Account Representative in Denver, CO
    Current Employee - Senior Account Representative in Denver, CO

    I have been working at 3M

    No opinion of CEO
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    The people are truly talented great people. I have worked for 3M for 13 years and it was overall a positive experience that developed my skill sets.

    Cons

    The compensation is not appropriate based on the level compared to other industries. Promotional opportunites are highly political versus based on overall capability.

    Advice to Management

    Provide more opportunities for career advancement for those who work in remote locations. Compensation for management positions is very low compared to management positions within other companies.


There are newer employer reviews for 3M
There are newer employer reviews for 3M

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