AT&T

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1 person found this helpful  

Well paying job that pushes hard on sales

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Retail Sales Consultant in Tacoma, WA
Current Employee - Retail Sales Consultant in Tacoma, WA

I have been working at AT&T part-time (more than an year)

Pros

They pay very well with the compensation plan and you get to work with technology every day.

Cons

Sometimes the corporate structure can be very stressful as they push very hard on sales

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Make sure to treat your employees with respect and know their needs, not necessarily only what's best for the company.

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

6250 Other Employee Reviews for AT&T (View Most Recent)

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Retail Store Manager from the Retail Leadership Development Program

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Retail Sales Manager
    Current Employee - Retail Sales Manager

    I have been working at AT&T full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    I am going to be as fair and as balanced as I can during this review:

    1. For a college graduate straight out of school, you aren't going to make the kind of money that you can make as a store manager at AT&T.
    2. Benefits are pretty good (medical, dental, 401K, pension, tuition reimbursement).
    3. If you have supportive leaders, they will pull through for you. I'll go into more of this in the "cons" section because if you don't have supportive leaders (and they don't like you) you're in trouble.
    4. You get to work with cool products. AT&T services and products aren't half bad. You also get 40% off accessories and a lot of service discounts on your wireless and U-Verse bills
    5. There's A LOT of training, and if you have the time and drive you can learn a lot of self-development.
    6. Upper leadership (executives) is very intelligent with some great ideas and seem to really have vision.
    7. As a store manager, you can really develop a close relationship with your boss and get to know them. They are also not at your store everyday which is a plus if you don't like micromanagement.
    8. The Retail Leadership Development Program invests a lot of money to train college graduates to be polished business professionals. If anything that's good experience.
    9. Great resume builder for recent college grads if you stick it out.
    10. Big company so potential for career movement (a lot more so if you're mobile and willing to move around the country).
    11. In my district and market, they try to recognize sales achievements and it's fun (if you're a performer).
    12. There is major job security. Unless you do something totally against rules and code of business conduct, you're pretty secure. In my district they subscribe to "If you can't run a store, we will find a different job for you." They don't really believe in firing managers (unless they don't like you).

    Cons

    1. For RLDP, make sure you're really mobile. You may not get to go home when they place you and living someplace new where you don't know anyone isn't all it's cracked up to be. Remember that on top of that, you'll have the stress and responsibilities of running a store along with being lonely if you're in a new place. Not emotionally or mentally healthy.
    2. RLDP can be full of pretentious leaders (who are either disconnected from the field or just pretending to drink the Kool-Aid so they can get through the trainings themselves). It could also be full of pretentious college grads. Learn to get along well with people if you're joining this program.
    3. It is retail. So, retail hours, mean customers, and epic sales driving. It is what you signed up for though, so be sure that's what you REALLY want.
    4. When I joined the program, they told me I could be promoted in 1-2 years. Last I heard, they told recent candidates that they can look to be promoted within 5 years. Expect fives years, that way you won't be disappointed.
    5. If your boss doesn't like you for whatever reason, you're screwed. Life can be miserable but this is true for any other job.
    6. If you really want to do a good job, there is zero work life balance. You are expected to respond to your boss' messages on your days off. You can't take Sat and Sun off together but your boss does, so if he texts you when he's working (like Monday) that is a day you're off.
    7. Really old white guys run the show. And old guys run a lot of leadership positions. Once in a while they're young, but from my experience it is an old boys' club. Women have bigger challenges in this company and this job.
    8. You have to wait a really long time to be promoted a level up. Remember what I said about job security? Your boss has even more security than you do (no matter how much he doesn't adapt to the changes of the business). Your chances of being promoted are increased significantly if you're willing to move. But if you're living in New York, who wants to move to Kentucky?
    9. Work life balance--if you mention it, your boss will think you're lazy (at least mine does). Because you're a 20 something year old right out of college they expect you to bend over backwards and bite the bullet about your social life.
    10. A lot of politics. They never mean what they say. Read between the lines and be careful what you say. Unless you don't care. Then say what you want!
    11. If you're well-liked by your boss, he will do things to protect you, promote you, etc. If you're not well-liked by your boss, he will do things to get you out of his area.
    12. They can trade you around and make you switch stores that are really far away without increasing your pay. No one ever says no to this, though I'm sure a lot of retail managers hate it.
    13. If you break your RLDP contract and leave the field before your time, you may be expected to pay a lot of money. Think carefully and read over your contract.
    14. If you don't buy in to something right away, that's a mental barrier!
    15. There are a lot of metrics to drive, over 20 metrics. They'll keep adding on more. Regardless of what they say, the comp structure IS harder and harder to hit every year. My store has over-performed consistently and I'm working harder than someone who consistently underperforms and am being paid less than him.
    16. There is no real incentive to run a big store except for career growth. But you're not getting an area manager position unless you move, your boss retires, or gets fired (which will never happen).
    17. It's an Old Boys Club. It's like a fraternity. In my district, I have male area managers who are "best buddies" and run the show together.
    18. They tell you to take the inspired and engaged survey but nothing really gets addressed. They just talk a lot about how they REALLY DO READ the feedback!
    19. Your peers are competitive and may not be supportive of you.
    20. Not an environment where you can truly be vocal (and I'm coming from a place where my DOS had my back).
    21. You're only as good as your performance.
    22. They laid off your store greeters and finance reps. Guess who does all that work but doesn't get paid any higher? You. Or you can delegate it, but you still have to inspect anyway.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    LISTEN to the people in the front lines. Feedback that isn't positive is not a "mental barrier" and that term is dangerous to the progress of this business. Stop rolling out things without running by us first. For example, you decided to put managers on a managers schedule. You have your corporate sales execution managers send out and bus toss those who "don't follow the schedule" when you all take as many vacations and get weekends off. That hypocrisy is apparent. Offer a SAFE forum that isn't career impacting if someone speaks up.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Cowboys not only looking out for themselves

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at AT&T full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    benefits, employees who aren't afraid to work

    Cons

    almost everything is a con, everything is about the bottom dollar only for big wigs.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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