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Great Company- Your experience is determined entirely on the projects you work on

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Arlington, VA
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, VA

I worked at Accenture full-time for more than a year

Pros

Good benefits, lots of time off, great potential for upward mobility, lots of different projects and areas to focus on, great training opportunities

Cons

Very bureaucratic, hard to find good mentorship unless you seek it out. Management varies. Business practices are often segmented, hard to transfer to other offices

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Work on developing your people and providing more opportunities for growth for young employees

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

Other Reviews for Accenture

  1. 3 people found this helpful  

    Two-Faced Company

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Contracts Specialist  in  Arlington, VA
    Former Employee - Contracts Specialist in Arlington, VA

    I worked at Accenture full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Benefits are competitive. 26 days of PTO and 6% 401K company matching and the ability to purchase company stock at a discount. Work from home capability but that largely depends on which department you work for. Salary appears to be pretty competitive; I made a 15,000 bump from my previous employer to here.

    Cons

    Many, at least in the Contract Management Services part of the company. Contract Management is a very unorganized part of the company. I worked in CMAS, which was a support group to assist contract management. Consistently poor record keeping and document storage and retrieval was a nightmare, even though this is something Accenture does for clients.

    Workload was tough. It wasn’t bad when I first started but they laid off half of my team and forced the work onto everyone else. As my career lengthened I found the tasks of myself and coworkers to be increasing dramatically. Due to position the cuts, we were essentially doing the jobs of 3 people each. The atmosphere was very aggressive and cut throat when it came to work deadlines and tasks to be performed. If you made a mistake you are better off playing ignorant or pushing the blame on someone else. You will fail here if you are the kind of person who takes personal accountability with the desire to learn from your mistakes and improve. It’s better to not make any mistakes at all, you will pay for them. I learned slowly, but towards the end of my employment I started keeping detailed logs of my activities and requests that came though me to avoid being thrown under the bus by others. It worked, but I did this too late.

    Was laid off. After a year and a half with the company Contract Management laid off approximately 40 people due to unforeseen budget problems in 2014. Two weeks before that happened I had received a raise and a bonus for excellent performance, which tells me they had no idea what they were doing. When I was let go, my supervisor and career counselor weren’t even notified that I had been terminated and had 1 month to find new work outside of the company. After being laid off, they hired a temp to take over my position. Accenture did pay well when I first came into the company, I guess they’ve decided to cut back on that and hire cheaper and more easily disposable workforce.

    Shady conditions for the layoff. A month and a half before the layoff I was notified by my supervisor verbally that I was going on a performance improvement plan (PIP) for poor performance in specific areas. The PIP was never formalized, never had an official review meeting nor did I receive or sign any documents to formalize the PIP. For 45 very stressful days after that I addressed all of the issues my supervisor had received positive recognition from her that I had fully addressed the problems she was having and thanked me putting the hard work in to improve the situaton. I assumed that maybe she didn’t formalize the PIP and was just using it to scare me in the beginning. I believed this because I got a raise two weeks before I was laid off and was told I was performing very well. I also wasn’t expecting the raise because I was a temp to hire recently converted / hired by Accenture full time and was not eligible for bonus or raise till the next year, so it was a surprise. At the end of the 45 days I thought I was in the clear and was starting to have a positive relationship again with my supervisor but then was laid off with no advance notice. I was invited to shady and unannounced performance review meeting with a Director I have little contact with on Friday. There wasn’t even a calendar invite and was notified that he would only need 15minutes of my time, 15minutes for a performance review meeting is un heard of. When I got the meeting they cut to the chase and told me I had a month to find new employment and the reason my position is being eliminated is not due to performance in anyway and was due to unforeseen shortfalls in the upcoming 2014 year.

    While I can only speculate, my guess is Contract Management wanted to make a major cut to the workforce and was looking to remove anyone who either made too much or was in the lower performance bracket. If they really had budget problems they would not have given me a raise just two weeks before that.
    What I learned from Accenture Contract Management is that they are a very cut throat part of the company, at least the Accenture Federal portion of the company. They don’t utilize their own solutions they are selling to clients, they over work their staff and instead of working with under performers they eliminate them. I worked very hard for Accenture and despite the problems I was having at the end I had done great work for the company and had invested much of my personal time and life to help make the company successful. At the end of the day, the company did not have the same commitment to me and to many others.

    If you want a company to grow and learn, don’t work here. If you are an established contract management professional working towards the end game of your career, this may be the place for you. Be advised though, my original boss from when I first started was also let go in an odd way. She had built the CMAS Support team to Contract Management and worked very hard and loved by everyone. She was forced to resign in the middle of a vacation she was on just three months before the big layoff. The hiring/firing practices of this company are shameful.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You're hiring / firing process is shameful. You need to take personal responsibility for those you hire. You hired them, if they're having problems you have a part to play in that as well. Consider work / life balance and consider the company's core values. The way I was treated and let go at the end did not live up to the Accenture way.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 8 people found this helpful  

    Great place to launch a career!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Systems Integration Consultant  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Systems Integration Consultant in New York, NY

    I worked at Accenture full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Offers an opportunity for intelligent, problem-solving and ambitious people to do exciting work that you would never get to do in industry. Working for Accenture or any of the big IT consulting firms is like IT boot camp. The work is challenging. You (mostly) build great camaraderie with your colleagues who are super smart and likely close to having the same amount of ambition and commitment to success. (Be warned you will be disappointed when you leave consulting for industry.

    Traveling is awesome when you are young. You get to work for some great clients and if you are lucky in some great locations. If you are savvy you can see the world while getting some great work experience. Awesome for someone out of college.

    The quality of the experience is incredible. You will learn Accenture Delivery Methodology which is a great asset that will benefit you the rest of your career wherever you go.

    Cons

    Travel is usually incompatible with a healthy relationship with a significant other and if you can do that, I don't get how you can travel when you have kids (dads or moms). Eventually the work/life imbalance of consulting will inhibit you from having the relationships you want so if that is a goal, quit when you have gotten enough of the awesome experience so that you have the marketable skills to get a high paying job elsewhere, but aren't too fat, old and bald (for the men) to attract a suitable mate and settle down.

    Most Managing Partners are very bad at managing people (for explanation see 'Advice to Management')

    All in all Accenture will likely be a great experience, which oddly enough can be a con at your next job. Accenture is a well-oiled machine with super smart and ambitious people, which sets you up from great disappointment if you leave for industry because you want a family.

    Consulting will probably land you a great job because recruiters know that you are a high caliber talent with great experience. They will also tell you how that external experience is such an asset and that your new company really values and wants that external perspective. Don't get your hopes up. That has not been my experience. Most corporations have cultures of entrenched bureaucrats (I even say that as someone that worked for the government) that don't want change even if its that idea that you implemented and delivered tons of value when you were consulting at Apple.

    (This could be a review of another company)
    As a full-time employee in industry (even at successful Fortune 500s) you may be very disappointed by: the lack of rationale behind some of the work you do (not value-add, on some VPs objectives and delivering may not help the company, but it will get them a nice performance rating), the messiness of the IT function, illogical processes, poorly thought out solutions, poorly executed plans and seeming apathy. Wait, but you are a consultant right. You fix these kinds of inefficiencies right? You can bring some method to the madness.

    More likely, you will suggest an improvement, your older colleague will resent the suggestion, because they feel threatened because it may suggest something that they are doing isn't as good as it could be and you know better. and thinks of you as a know-it-all that doesn't get "the way things work around here". At this point, you may be feeling disillusioned and you can either: accept the mediocrity of your new job and focus on getting satisfaction from something outside of work, make your goal succeeding in corporate politics instead of doing meaningful work, or go be an entrepreneur (or go back into consulting - if no family).

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Rethink the Profile of Partners

    Being a good technical consultant and being a good manager of people are very different skillets. My observation was that most project leaders do not have both. The majority of colleagues that left Accenture was due to poor people leadership skills by the project leadership team.

    If this is a problem worth addressing I have 2 suggestions. The first is for the short run, but think the latter would be much more effective in the long run.

    1) Train your Partners to Develop People Management Skills

    Most Partners I worked with had large egos and lost credibility because they relied on positional authority for power, instead of a mutual respect and inspiring leadership. Try to teach them how to be empathic, and to motivate and inspire a team (rallying the troops instead of "because I said so").

    2) Address the Root Cause - Promote people that are actually good leaders of people to Partner

    Understanding the problem takes a bit of psycho-analyzing the role of "Partner". The root of the problem is that in order to be a good leader that respects people. It is foolish to think that someone that doesn't respect themselves would be capable of respecting others. If you have stayed around long enough to become a Partner (btw Partner is a measure of endurance, not intelligence or achievement) you have made a choice that work/life balance is not important to you. The accomplishment of achieving the coveted role and salary of Partner is used to justify the lack of work/life balance. This makes these people dangerous. Their ego becomes a defense mechanism. If being Partner isn't so important they would have to deal with the intense guilt or emptiness about all of the life with their family and friends that they have already lost. All of their striving is probably to prove something and not deal with their underlying issues and feeling of inadequacy. Thus instead of really living life they have chosen the firm as their real family and friends. HOW DO I KNOW THIS? Because I was in the same striving/shame trap. The harder and more you work, the more exhausted you get, the bigger sacrifice you make, the more important you think it is (FYI - It is not that important).

    Healthy people won't sacrifice enough to stay long enough to make Partner. So what happens is that the people that GET how to treat employees never make Partner. Becoming Partner is at odds with this concept of work/life balance and don't expect it for themselves and thus think it unnecessary to respect the work/life boundaries of any of their subordinates. When you feel like you are not respected as a subordinate you resent the leaders.

    I guarantee if you look at any failed project that resulted in significant voluntary turnover, this is at the heart.I

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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