There are newer employer reviews for Alcoa

 

Wonderful with a nice environment and great co-workers

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Intern in Cleveland, OH
Current Employee - Intern in Cleveland, OH

I have been working at Alcoa as an intern (less than an year)

Pros

Everyone works as a team and it is easy to find solutions to common problems from co-workers

Cons

Word gets around quickly if you mess up

Recommends
Positive Outlook

191 Other Employee Reviews for Alcoa (View Most Recent)

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Slave to the money and overtime

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Lost In the Crowd in Newburgh, IN
    Current Employee - Lost In the Crowd in Newburgh, IN

    I have been working at Alcoa full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    Pay check, the people you work with, excluding the company people that have no business being managers.

    Cons

    They don't stand behind what they tell you!

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Grow some balls and stand up to what is right!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 7 people found this helpful  

    The only job I've ever had where I was honestly a little scared to show up every morning.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Financial Analyst in Knoxville, TN
    Former Employee - Senior Financial Analyst in Knoxville, TN

    I worked at Alcoa

    Pros

    -Lots of smart and talented co-workers to draw knowledge/experience from and a willingness from them to share it
    -Large, well-established multi-national corporation with top shelf resources/technology
    -Got some experience in an area I otherwise might not have (accounting) that will likely serve me well in the future

    Cons

    -In a year, I never heard a manager tell an employee that they did a good job
    -Overreactions to small mistakes as if you almost personally caused the company to go out of business
    -Culture was unbelievably dated with unwillingness to change and long-tenure employees who would sometimes go out of their way to make your job alot harder than it needed to be. Very few young people working there
    -Would rather save a few dollars than adequately staff the organization. My workload at Alcoa was 30-40% higher than at my last job. I'm a fast worker, and me and the rest of Finance were always in the office
    -Organization is rather flat, so there aren't clear division of responsibilities in alot of cases
    -I was expected to catch mistakes of other employees all over the world that were making journal entries daily. In a ledger with 1000's of transactions spread across an entire month, I was expected to close the ledger on a $1 billion annual world-wide business, bridge variances to forecast/plan down to a microscopic level, AND review all the transactions for accuracy by 6:00 PM on Workday 1 (1 Day Close)
    -I don't mind the extra work, it just seemed like management either had no idea how much we had to do or just didn't care enough to say anything. It wasn't until they saw our group's Life/Work balance scoring until they communicated to us that we shouldn't work so much. One group had so much free time they came up with all these new bridge analyses that senior management liked. Instead of having his group of 5 analysts be responsible for these recurring analyses, I was forced to do them all by myself. The other group simply had to copy/paste our work into a summary.
    -Senior management was not visible and didn't adequately address our legitimate concerns. For example, the bridge analyses went from 0 to 10 a month to 10-15 a week within a quarter's time. We weren't just bridging the important business scenarios, we were bridging all kinds of random scenarios. Eventually they started forcing us to re-do our entire Forecasting process anytime something changed. So if Marketing decided we could sell 10,000 more units the day after we did our forecast and a round of bridges, then I had to immediately re-do the Forecasting and resubmit the exact same bridges with the new data instead of waiting until the next update. During my time there, they added probably 40 hours a month of work to our plate while the group with 5 analysts didn't take on 1 new thing.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    My advice is that Alcoa has alot of smart/talented individuals working there that give their all and make the company the success it is. Senior management doesn't seem to realize just how smart/talented these people are because they are never really visible and instead overvalue manager types whose largest contribution to the company is tactfully schmoozing with the right people at every opportunity. Because the company is so flat, there are plenty of checks in the process and employees that go above and beyond to make up for any productivity lost due to managers socializing instead of working.

    They get away with their old school style/approach because the majority of the workers are old enough to have Pensions, which keeps them with the company. I honestly felt terrible for alot of my co-workers there, because I recognized how outstanding they were at their jobs despite all the curveballs being thrown at their head constantly, sometimes having to work past midnight, and receiving a salary that wasn't very competitive relative to other Fortune 500 companies. And when the quarter finally closes and the company delivers strong results, guess what happens? The underpaid employees chiefly responsible for the success might get a "good job", while ALL of the middle/senior management employees receive gigantic bonuses tied to the performance.

    If they ever want to attract and RETAIN good young talent regularly, they have to be willing to make some serious adjustments. When I was there the age gap was already one of their largest concerns. Our business consisted of a few 20 something's among a much larger group of employees 5 years or less away from retirement. The employees close to retirement have been with Alcoa for long periods of time, sometimes in the same position for 5-10 years. I believe the age gap developed organically because the experienced employees were highly effective in their positions, unwilling to start developing the next generation, and knew they would never have to move unless they wanted to. Because of this culture, young talent turnovers like gangbusters.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
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