American Institutes for Research

  www.air.org
  www.air.org
There are newer employer reviews for American Institutes for Research

 

This is an extremely demanding work environment.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

I worked at American Institutes for Research

Pros

Competitive salary, competitive benefits, and that's it.

Cons

People expect you to work more than 8 hours a day.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

You need to make sure that project leaders stop overworking your employees.

Doesn't Recommend
Disapproves of CEO

107 Other Employee Reviews for American Institutes for Research (View Most Recent)

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  1. 15 people found this helpful  

    Started great, ended as my most negative employment experience.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Research Associate in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Research Associate in Washington, DC

    I worked at American Institutes for Research

    Pros

    The job started positively, the work was interesting, people were friendly, there were lots of catered meals. They also had a large number of parties and social events, which some people may really enjoy, but were not something I was interested in. However, that turns into a negative in the next section.

    Cons

    I was lied to a number of times by senior management, verbally and in writing. I was told in writing that I would be getting a promotion at one point, and then they decided not to promote me. The very next year, I was turned down for a promotion again. This did not just affect me. I spoke to a number of coworkers that this has happened to. You may be promised promotions only to have them taken away at what amounts to a whim. Promotions are very difficult to come by, even if you are doing vital work for the company. The employee appraisal system is meaningless.

    A few of the less egregious lies involved the ability to work from home and assurances that I would only need to work 40 hours a week. I donated a substantial amount of time in most pay periods, just to get critical work done in time.

    I did not attend many parties, and this is where I honestly believe the job started to go from good to bad. I had a coworker at one point tell me that if I didn't go to the social events, that it would be incredibly difficult for me to progress past a certain point in the company. I didn't believe it at the time, but I sincerely regret not listening now. I had thought that hard work, doing the things that others couldn't, good ideas, and being overwhelmingly positive would be enough, but it wasn't. As time went on, I got the feeling that management was unhappy with me. Things got progressively worse over time until, as I neared my last day, there was what seemed like outright anger or disdain.

    I have worked a number of jobs; I worked in the service industry when I was younger, and professional, career jobs since. I have left all of them on good terms with everyone that I worked with and have good friends that I met at most of them. I have never left a job under such acrimonious conditions. I was never told what caused them. My advice to others would be this: Be cautious and make friends with the senior management. If you don't, advancing in your career could be much more difficult or impossible.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Follow through on what you say you're going to do or allow. Lying about promotions or the ability to work from home really hurts the employees when they count on those things and they never materialize.

    Try to understand the work that your employees do. If you aren't willing to listen to the employees that work for you, you can't make the best decisions for any project.

    Value people based on merit, not how many social events they attend or how they seem to want to be friends. Some people value time with their children or families, and punishing or disliking them for that is unfair.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    Collegial atmosphere, bright employees, slow organization

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Research Associate in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Research Associate in Washington, DC

    I have been working at American Institutes for Research

    Pros

    - Collegiate atmosphere
    - Collaborative/project-based work
    - Quality work (as opposed to bigger firms)
    - Cross-discipline work (Workforce, Education, Healthcare, etc.)
    - Respect and trust among novice employees
    - Support for professional research (at least within the Workforce group)

    Cons

    - Slow organization
    - Not very innovative
    - Say they value work/life balance, but not always (depends on project manager)
    - Pay is lower than bigger firms (Booze, Deloite, etc.)

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - Implement some of the innovative HR stuff you promote in resaearch
    - Utilize the organizational psychology experts you have to enhance your own internal HR processes
    - Really demonstrate you value work/life balance

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
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