Anderson Merchandisers

www.amerch.com
There are newer employer reviews for Anderson Merchandisers

 

not too bad

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

I worked at Anderson Merchandisers

Pros

somewhat flexible work schedule, independent work

Cons

weekend work, not much help or support from management

Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

198 Other Employee Reviews for Anderson Merchandisers (View Most Recent)

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Great merchandising job

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Sales Merchandiser in Houston, TX
    Current Employee - Sales Merchandiser in Houston, TX

    I have been working at Anderson Merchandisers part-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    you work at best buy and you are pretty much your own boss

    Cons

    bad hours. not very flexible and you have to work tuesdays and sundays at 7 AM

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    don't make it mandatory to work on Sundays.

    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    If You Think Working at Headquarters Might Require a Little More Honesty, Read On

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Price Protection Processor in Amarillo, TX
    Former Employee - Price Protection Processor in Amarillo, TX

    I worked at Anderson Merchandisers full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    I am not there. And I only had to endure a little bit of humiliation and hell to get out of there.

    Cons

    I was hired to fulfill a newly created position after an audit found neglected accounting led to a $2 million company loss. While my manager enthusiastically interviewed me for the position, my direct supervisor obviously opposed the very creation of the full time position itself. Her blatant resentment of my college education did not help.

    For a month, this supervisor begrudgingly trained me well enough for me to realize her reluctance wasn't personal: she feared anyone fulfilling the obligations of my particular position would, by nature of the job, reveal to upper management the aforementioned accounting error might lay squarely on her shoulders. For too long, vendors asked for money and, without researching the veracity of their claims, my supervisor authorized company payment. In her defense, she was overworked, too. And she had not scratched her way out of the warehouse to give up this easily.

    Mysteriously, over the course of the month much of my training's progress stalled. But all the while my supervisor reassured me we were in no hurry; she was slated to stay by my side for the six months the training would require. She patiently spent two days showing me how to organize and reorganize my company GMail account. After all, I.T. did not even load my computer with the necessary programs to perform my job until my third week. In my down time, with her approval, I offered to write a manual of the tasks I was learning so others could learn them as well. Despite the obstacles, I was knowledgeable enough of all but two of the many requirements officially listed in my job description to write about them in full detail.

    After my first month's training with my supervisor constantly beside me - instructing me well after I'd mastered the tasks and promising me I was learning quickly and doing great - I was pulled into my new employee progress interview by both the supervisor and my once-enthusiastic manager. There they told me my comprehension of my job's duties was, indeed, too slow, and I was fired on the spot with no opportunity for rebuttal. Both refused to speak to me as my supervisor watched me pack my things and escorted me off the premises as if I was, ironically, the criminal. Oddly, everyone within my cubicle's vicinity was given the day off so my coworkers were spared the opportunity to say goodbye.

    Following my departure, the position returned to that of a part time temporary with limited access to certain company confidentialities and no employee protection against termination (as if there ever was such a thing). This was exactly what my supervisor desired all along. And you thought company coverups were limited to those silly surveys. With $2 million dollars missing in a Texas desert, it pays to be shady.

    Oh well. To the heartless go the spoils . . . and the karma. Didn't someone say they're hawking car batteries now? Far cry from the Nickleback days, eh, Amerch?

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Your company is disgraceful. and I hope you sink into the sand.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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