Apple

www.apple.com
There are newer employer reviews for Apple

1 person found this helpful  

Good company to work for, but keep in mind that it *is* Apple.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Mac Specialist (Apple Store) in San Diego, CA
Current Employee - Mac Specialist (Apple Store) in San Diego, CA

I have been working at Apple

Pros

The culture of the company is one of the best I've ever experienced. From the basic understanding that if you do something there's probably a good reason for it to the whole team-integration, there's no fear that there is going to be backstabbing or infighting. The fairly clear paths for keeping a career is a nice touch as well. Even the little things, like the Wellness Program, really convey that the company cares about the employees and values them as a major asset and not a liability.

Cons

Apple is a very exclusive company to work for and they know it. The pay isn't as high as one could get elsewhere, and sometimes minor infractions, like talking about a possible upcoming product launch, are enough to get you dismissed. Also, while my training, expertise, and career path lie with either repair of computers or education of users, I'm stuck in a sales job until a manager determines that I've met some benchmark that seems, at this time, to be completely arbitrary.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Recognize when an employee might feel like their current position isn't really providing the day-to-day challenge that will keep the work fun and interesting for an employee. Also eliminating some of the hoops that need to be jumped to get to a new position that one might wish to be in, especially if the employee is not especially well fit to their current position.

Recommends
Approves of CEO

4263 Other Employee Reviews for Apple (View Most Recent)

Sort: Rating Date
  1.  

    Apple, a great company, with great products, a great message, but not the best positions offered in a call center.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - IPhone Specialist in Austin, TX
    Former Employee - IPhone Specialist in Austin, TX

    I worked at Apple

    Pros

    the products, the perks, and the benefits

    Cons

    the career mobility, the hours at a call center are rough and there is not much flexibility. you have to plan your life around your work, pretty soon your life becomes your work and not much else. it can be draining at times and if you are not careful you can slip into that mundane routine without anyway out. the communication pathways to escalate up and down needed work. if management needed to do something it would take some time before it would go up the pipeline or something would come down it.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    to be more flexible with schedules, if everyone is fighting for the m-f work schedule there should be an incentive to have to work a weekend

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Awesome company, unforgettable experience, totally worthwhile endeavor.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Mac Specialist (Apple Store) in Burlington, MA
    Former Employee - Mac Specialist (Apple Store) in Burlington, MA

    I worked at Apple

    Pros

    Apple doesn't just have employees; they have True Believers. Most people begin working for the company because they're long-term Apple customers. Some grew up hoping to work for Apple one day. It's exciting to be part of something that inspires awe, curiosity, and sometimes envy among even the most stubborn detractors. Working for a company that produces products and services you believe in is much more fulfulling than, for example, hawking hoochie halters at Hollister. Even as a part-time employee, there are supplemental 'perks' to the job, including discounts, weekly training on software packages, and sometimes, even product gifts. For example, during my tenure with Apple, employees were given the iLife software suite, a 30GB Video iPod, a shuffle, Parallels Software, and an 8GB iPhone - all completely free. While those gifts are absolutely welcomed by staff, that isn't what inspires such praise and loyalty. Many Apple employees feel almost like missionaries; we spread the word of Mac, explain how Apple products can improve peoples' lives, and instead of just handing them the 'fishing pole', we teach the customers to fish through online video tutorials, in-store demonstrations, workshops, and even personalized weekly one-on-one training sessions. Personally, I have witnessed everyone from suited businessmen to droopy-jean clad teens to technophobic senior citizens come into the store, use the products for themselves, and fall in love. What's really fun to see, though, is how surprised they are at their own enjoyment of the products. The look of unmitigated joy that spreads clear out to the corners of their mouths and beams right up to the corners of their eyes is not something I have found in any other job I have had. Apple doesn't just give people products; they give them feelings such as pride, confidence, excitement, joy, and yes, even 'coolness'.

    Cons

    Depending on the store, management can make your life HELL. All the customer accolades, positive co-worker relationships, job competence, product knowledge, and above-average goal/metric achievement in the world will mean SQUAT if someone in management dislikes you. There's no recourse when it's your word against theirs, and the Apple concept of "Fearless Feedback" is a complete joke when your supervisor's favorite phrases include "I'm not going to discuss that with you", "This isn't a conversation", and "I am not opening this to dialogue". That said, I also know that leadership teams at some stores take a much different approach with their staff, and as such, a much more pleasant, positive work experience is provided. It's difficult to communicate effectively as a part-timer, as there is a company-wide moratorium on external communications. This is especially problematic when changes are made to the schedule mid-week, and you're notified only by email that can only be accessed from within the store, and you're not due in before your newly-scheduled shift. This could potentially be solved with the implementation of a secure, password-protected employee website that would be accessible from anywhere, wherein an employee could be notified of schedule changes or other crucial information.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Establish an arbitration process for escalation of employee issues. For example, if there is a conflict between one member of management and an employee, who do you think has 'leverage of credibility' in such a situation? It would be extremely helpful for an unbiased, outside perspective to weigh in on these matters. Follow the Apple concepts such as "Assume Positive Intent", offer and accept "Fearless Feedback". Create an environment in which your staff will work *with* you and not just *for* you. Don't castigate employees when others are present, especially if the employee in question is not present. Utilize your staff's individual strengths. Always try to remember why it is that person was hired. Work with staff to tackle challenges; don't issue arbitrary and inexplicit commands to 'fix problems'. Praise in public. When positive feedback is received about an employee, share it. Share it with the employee and share it with the team. (Don't think we don't know that it doesn't always find its way to us.) Consider employee suggestions. Be flexible.

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Apple

Work at Apple? Share Your Experiences

Apple

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.